POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL

Holistic Caring Pty Ltd

Trading as ‘Holistic Home Care’

ACN 627238831

ABN 33627238831

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ABOUT Holistic Home Care……………………………………………………. 6

ABOUT THIS MANUAL…………………………………………………………. 7

PART 1. GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT………………………….. 8

GOVERNANCE POLICY AND PROCEDURE………………………….. 9

STRATEGIC AND OPERATIONAL PLANNING POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………………………………………………………………… 12

COMPLIANCE POLICY AND PROCEDURE………………………….. 14

Responsibilities……………………………………………………………………….. 14

Reporting Compliance Failure…………………………………………………… 15

INTERNAL REVIEW AND EXTERNAL AUDIT SCHEDULE…….. 16

VEHICLE SAFETY POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………………. 20

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND DELEGATIONS POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………………………………………………………………… 23

Approvals and Delegations………………………………………………………. 24

Bank Accounts………………………………………………………………………… 24

Assets……………………………………………………………………………………. 25

Insurances……………………………………………………………………………… 25

Budget processes……………………………………………………………………. 25

Reporting……………………………………………………………………………….. 26

Payroll……………………………………………………………………………………. 26

Tax Obligations and Superannuation…………………………………………. 26

Fraud and Corruption Control……………………………………………………. 27

National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)…………………………….. 27

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT POLICY AND PROCEDURE… 30

RECORDS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………………………………………………………………… 33

Policies and Procedures…………………………………………………………… 34

Personal Information……………………………………………………………….. 34

Identifying and Analysing Risk………………………………………………….. 35

RISK MANAGEMENT POLICY AND ROCEDURE…………………………………36

HUMAN RESOURCES POLICY AND PROCEDURE………………. 42

Recruitment and selection………………………………………………………… 45

Mandatory Checks…………………………………………………………………… 46

Personal information………………………………………………………………… 48

Training and Development……………………………………………………….. 50

Termination of Employment……………………………………………………… 53

Disciplinary Action…………………………………………………………………… 53

Dismissal……………………………………………………………………………….. 54

STAFF CODE OF CONDUCT………………………………………………. 58

Respect………………………………………………………………………………….. 59

Integrity………………………………………………………………………………….. 60

Accountability…………………………………………………………………………. 62

Diligence………………………………………………………………………………… 63

Reporting breaches of the code of conduct………………………………… 63

LEAVE POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………………………………… 64

Paid leave………………………………………………………………………………. 65

Unpaid leave…………………………………………………………………………… 66

RETURN TO WORK POLICY AND PROCEDURE………………….. 69

EQUITY, ANTI-DISCRIMINATION AND WORKPLACE HARASSMENT POLICY AND PROCEDURE…………………………. 71

Expected Workplace Behaviours………………………………………………. 72

Responding to Harassment, Discrimination and Bullying……………… 73

STAFF COMPLAINTS POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………….. 74

CHILD SAFETY CODE OF CONDUCT……………………………………………….77

CHILD SAFETY POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………………………………….79

WORKPLACE HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………………………………………………………………… 83

FIRE SAFETY AND EMERGENCY POLICY AND PROCEDURE 87

Premises………………………………………………………………………………… 88

Operational Readiness…………………………………………………………….. 88

Emergency Plans……………………………………………………………………. 88

Fire Emergency………………………………………………………………………. 89

Crisis and Emergency Plan…………………………………………………………..89

CHEMICAL USE AND STORAGE POLICY AND PROCEDURE………………….96

INFECTION CONTROL POLICY AND PROCEDURE………………………….…100

ELECTRICAL SAFETY POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………. 103

INCIDENT MANAGEMENT POLICY AND PROCEDURE………. 108

Responding to Incidents…………………………………………………………. 109

Reporting Incidents………………………………………………………………… 109

Reportable Incidents………………………………………………………………. 110

External Reporting………………………………………………………………… 110

Level 2 Incidents………………………………………………………….…………111

Investigating and Resolving Incidents………………………………………. 111

Debrief and Support………………………………………………………………. 112

Incident Management Flow Chart…………………………………………………113

MANUAL HANDLING POLICY AND PROCEDURE…………………………..…..115

PART 2. CLIENT SERVICE DELIVERY………………………………….. 118

PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY POLICY AND PROCEDURE………………………………………………………………………………………… 119

SERVICE ACCESS AND EQUITY POLICY AND PROCEDURE………………………………………………………………………………………… 124

Disability Service Access……………………………………………………….. 125

Aged Care Access…………………………………………………………………. 126

Waiting List processes…………………………………………………………… 127

Alternative supports……………………………………………………………….. 128

Continuous improvement……………………………………………………….. 128

ASSESSMENT, PLANNING AND REVIEW POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………………………………………………………………. 129

SERVICE DELIVERY POLICY AND PROCEDURE………………. 134

PROVIDING INFORMATION, ADVICE AND REFERRAL POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………………………………………………………. 137

MEDICATION MANAGEMENT POLICY AND PROCEDURE…. 139

Administering Medications……………………………………………………… 139

Medication Records……………………………………………………………….. 140

Storage and Disposal of Medications………………………………………. 140

Reporting……………………………………………………………………………… 141

WORKING WITH CARERS AND FAMILY MEMBERS POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………………………………………………………. 142

SERVICE EXIT POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………………….. 145

CLIENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………………………………………………………………. 147

PREVENTING AND RESPONDING TO ABUSE, NEGLECT AND EXPLOITATION POLICY AND PROCEDURE………………………. 149

Prevention of abuse, neglect and exploitation…………………………… 153

Identification of Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation……………………….. 153

Responding to abuse, neglect and exploitation…………………………. 154

External Reporting …………………………………………………………………155

Reporting Incident to the NDIS………………………………………………..…..157

Investigating Reportable Incidents………………………………………………..159

Record Keeping …………………………………………………………………….160

Incident Management Flow Chart…………………………………………………162

DECISION MAKING AND CHOICE POLICY AND PROCEDURE………………………………………………………………………………………… 164

FEEDBACK, COMPLIMENTS AND COMPLAINTS POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………………………………………………………………. 166

Overview………………………………………………………………………………. 168

Feedback……………………………………………………………………………… 168

Complaints Management Process…………………………………………… 169

Procedural Fairness…………………………………………………………………172

NDIS: Complaints Escalation and Dispute Resolution……………….. 172

Aged Care: Complaints Escalation and Dispute Resolution……….. 173

Complaints Flow Chart ………………………………………………………….…174

BEHAVIOUR SUPPORT AND RESTRICTIVE INTERVENTIONS POLICY AND                              PROCEDURE……………………………………………………………………………..182

CLIENTS WHO DO NOT RESPOND TO SCHEDULED VISITS 198

AGED CARE CLIENT CHARTER………………………………………… 201

HIGH INTENSITY POLICY AND PROCEDURE …………………………………..204

NDIS CONFLICT OF INTEREST POLICY AND PROCEDURE. 209

CLINICAL WASTE POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………………………….….212

NDIS CANCELLATION POLICY AND PROCEDURE……………. 226

MOBILE PHONE POLICY AND PROCEDURE ……………………………………228

SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY AND PROCEDURE ………………………….…………230

 

ABOUT Holistic Home Care

Holistic Home Care (ABN 33627238831) was established by Ashawani Soni in 2018 to provide services to participants in the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) and Home Care participants in Queensland.

Mission

To improve the quality of life of people with disability on the philosophy of holistic approach

 

Vision

 

Achieve great outcomes and provide quality support to people with disabilities and enhance their well being

 

Values

  • Equality and diversity
  • Empathy and compassion
  • Accountability
  • Honesty and Communication
  • Privacy and confidentiality
  • Safe working environment
  • True value for money

ABOUT THIS MANUAL

This Policy and Procedure Manual sets out the policies and procedures that govern Holistic Home Care’s NDIS and Aged Care (Home Care) operations and service delivery. The policies and procedures within the manual will be reviewed regularly, based on a risk management approach to review timeframes.

The manual is designed to ensure a common understanding and common organisational practices across all of Holistic Home Care’s services and to assist the Director, staff, volunteers, contractors and students to understand what is required of them in their roles at Holistic Home Care.

This manual is designed to be complimentary to all State & Commonwealth legislation and does not override any acts or other legal requirements.

A hard copy of this manual will be held by the Director of Holistic Home Care. Where staff are employed, they are expected to refer to the manual on a regular basis and keep up to date with any changes.

PLEASE NOTE: For ease of reference, this manual refers to responsibilities of the Director, staff, volunteers, contractors and students. While Holistic Home Care does not currently employ staff or volunteers, these roles will be assumed by the Director until such time as further recruitment is undertaken. Policies applicable to the organisation once it employs staff are supplied to support organisational growth into the future.

 

Understanding the Policy Codes

Each Policy and Procedure in this manual has an inbuilt document version control. The codes and versions of each policy should directly map to the Document Review Schedule. Each policy and procedure is named appropriately, and contains a table at the top of the document that identifies the policy code, the person responsible for reviewing (or implementing) the policy, the status of the document (is it still a draft, or has it been approved/released), and the date the document was last updated. For example:

 

Policy Code G001.01
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 25 July 2018
   
   

 

 

PART 1. GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT

Holistic Home Care’s Governance and Management Policies and Procedures describe how the organisation meets its requirements in relation to operational, legal, and financial matters.

GOVERNANCE POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code G001.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

  • PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure demonstrates Holistic Home Care’s commitment to sound governance, and describes how the organisation’s governance is carried out and reviewed.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, and any additional staff, where employed.

  • DEFINITIONS

Governance is the process by which organisations are directed, controlled and held to account. It encompasses authority, accountability, stewardship, leadership, directions and control exercised in the organisation[1].

  • POLICY

Holistic Home Care has effective systems and processes in place to guide and support its overall direction, effectiveness, supervision processes and internal and external accountability. Accountable and transparent governance arrangements ensure Holistic Home Care:

  • complies with relevant legislation, regulations and contractual arrangements;
  • supports and develops its staff (where staff are employed); and
  • delivers quality and safe services to its clients.

The Director has the qualifications and experience to deal with issues relating to financial and legal matters, human resources, service management and service promotion and/or business partnerships in place to achieve these requirements.

  • PROCEDURE
  • Holistic Home Care is a registered business name of the business Holistic Caring Pty Ltd. (ABN 33627238831).
  • Holistic Home Care is run by Ashawani Soni (Director) who manages and delivers the service with a management team approach.
  • The Director has responsibility for all aspects of the business including clients and service delivery, human resources, property maintenance and finances.
  • Holistic Home Care operates in accordance with the ‘Replaceable Rules’ outlined in the Corporations Act 2001 (Cwlth), which outline the method of governance for the organisation.
  • Casual, Part time or Full-time permanent employment may be offered as the business grows. Staff other than the Director may be employed under the Social, Community, Home Care and Disability Services Industry Award 2010 (MA00010).
  • Holistic Home Care values stakeholder participation and acknowledges the importance of feedback in improving outcomes for people accessing the service.

 

Responsibilities

  • The Director is responsible for Holistic Home Care’s NDIS-specific service delivery, including:
  • Compliance monitoring – ensuring compliance with the objectives, purposes and values of the organisation, and with its constitution;
  • Organisational governance – setting or approving policies, plans and budgets to achieve those objectives, and monitoring performance against them;
  • Strategic planning – reviewing and approving strategic direction and initiatives;
  • Regulatory monitoring – ensuring that the organisation complies with all relevant laws, regulations and regulatory requirements;
  • Financial monitoring – reviewing the organisation’s budget, monitoring management and financial performance to ensure the solvency, financial strength and good performance of the organisation;
  • Financial reporting – preparing, considering and approving annual financial statements and required reports;
  • Organisational structure – setting and maintaining a framework of delegation and internal control;
  • Business continuity planning – ensuring appropriate processes are in place to ensure business continuity for clients;
  • Risk management – reviewing and monitoring the effectiveness of risk management and compliance in the organisation; agreeing or ratifying all policies and decisions on matters which might create significant risk to the organisation, financial or otherwise; and
  • Dispute management – dealing with and managing conflicts that may arise within the organisation, including conflicts arising between staff, contractors, volunteers, students or clients.
  • Where Service Managers are employed, they will be responsible for the operational management and monitoring of the service.

 

Conflict of Interest

  • The personal interests of staff, and those of any associated persons, must not be allowed to take precedence over those of Holistic Home Care generally.
  • Staff should seek to avoid conflicts of interest wherever possible. Full and prior disclosure of any conflict, potential conflict, or the appearance of a potential conflict, must be made to the Director. Once the conflict has been declared, the Director must decide what action to take to manage the conflict.
  • Failure to respond to actual or potential conflicts of interest can damage the reputation of and community confidence in Holistic Home Care. It may also have legal ramifications.
  • Staff must not take advantage of their position or inside information to gain, directly or indirectly, a personal benefit, or a benefit for any associated person (e.g. a family member or another organisation).
  • When making decisions, staff should consider:
  • Do I have any personal or private interests in a matter that may conflict or be perceived to conflict with my duties in the organisation?
  • Could there be a benefit for me, my family or friends into the future if I involve myself in a matter?
  • How will my involvement be viewed by others?
  • Does my involvement in the decision being made appear fair and reasonable?
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

 

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

STRATEGIC AND OPERATIONAL PLANNING POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code MAP001.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 10 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

  • PURPOSE AND SCOPE

Strategic and operational plans identify the organisation’s specific objectives and the requirements for achieving these objectives. The operational plan guides the organisation’s actions, determines service delivery models, and allows monitoring of progress and achievement.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, and any additional staff, where employed.

  • DEFINITIONS

Strategic Plan – A set of statements describing the purpose and ethical conduct for the organisation, together with the specific strategies designed to achieve the targets set for each of these.

Operational Plan – A practical plan used to outline how strategies will be achieved.

  • POLICY
  • Holistic Home Care is committed to working to an agreed organisational vision and set of values, and to using these to inform planning and service delivery.

 

  • PROCEDURE
  • Holistic Home Care’s Director develops, works to and annually reviews a three-year Strategic Plan, which identifies the key outcomes that the organisation wants to achieve, in line with the agreed vision and values of the organisation.
  • In reviewing the Strategic Plan, the Director will seek input from clients and other stakeholders, as appropriate.
  • The Director will formally review and update the Strategic Plan each financial year and at times of significant and unanticipated change.
  • Annual Operational Plans form the basis of the Director’s expectations of each year, and are subject to regular monitoring and review.

 

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed

COMPLIANCE POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code MAP002.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

  • PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure ensures that Holistic Home Care complies with the range of legislative, regulatory and contractual requirements that apply to its operations and keeps abreast of changes to these requirements.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, and any additional staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

  • POLICY
  • Holistic Home Care is committed to maintaining compliance with all regulatory, legislative and contractual requirements, and to using these to inform planning and service delivery.

Specific Compliance Requirements

  • Holistic Home Care will comply with all data collection, service delivery and financial reporting requirements of all relevant Queensland and Commonwealth government agencies.

NDIA Registered NDIS Provider Compliance

  • As a NDIA Registered NDIS Provider, Holistic Home Care must comply with the NDIS Terms of Business and the NDIS Guide to Suitability.
  • Holistic Home Care will continue to assess its compliance with the Terms of Business and Guide to Suitability as part of its annual self-assessment against the Queensland Human Services Standards.

 

  • PROCEDURE

Responsibilities

  • The Director is responsible for ensuring Holistic Home Care is, and remains, compliant.
  1. The Director (or delegate) will monitor changes to legislation and service standards and ensure regulatory compliance via ongoing contact with relevant government agencies, websites, and membership of peak organisations, and via internal reviews and external audits. Policies and procedures will be updated accordingly as compliance requirements change. Staff will be immediately advised of any changes.
  2. The Director (or delegate) will foster a compliance-aware workplace by including updates to relevant requirements and regular information sharing sessions on agendas for staff meetings, ensuring staff understand their compliance responsibilities.
  3. The Director (or delegate) is responsible for ensuring all external reporting requirements are met.
  • The Director (or delegate) is responsible for internal reviews and external audits, in accordance with the attached Internal Review and External Audit Schedule. These will be tracked in the Compliance Register.
  • All staff are responsible for managing compliance within their areas of influence.
  • Upon commencement, all staff will undergo Induction, which includes information and training on compliance responsibilities.

 

Reporting Compliance Failure

  • Holistic Home Care encourages proactive reporting of compliance failures, breaches, issues, incidents and complaints.
  • All staff must notify the Director once they become aware that a compliance failure has occurred or is likely to occur, or that a compliance-related complaint has been made.
  • The Director must address compliance failures or compliance-related complaints upon becoming aware of them, in order to re-establish compliance and provide protection to the organisation as quickly as possible.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

INTERNAL REVIEW AND EXTERNAL AUDIT SCHEDULE

Policy Code MAP003.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2
Focus of Review

 

Course of Action

 

Accountability

 

Timeframes

 

Governance
Policies and Procedures · Review for effectiveness and currency

· Merge, develop or repeal policies and procedures

Director Between annually and 3-yearly, based on associated risk
Strategic and Operational Plans · Director and Staff Planning Days Director Annually; June
Human Resources (where applicable)
Staff Performance · Performance Reviews Director Annually; July
· Staff satisfaction surveys Director Annually; September
Alignment of practice with procedures · Staff file audits Director Annually; March
Service Quality and Improvement
Clients · Client surveys to assess awareness of their rights and satisfaction levels and obtain suggestions for improvements. Director Annually, September
· Certification audit against the NDIS Practice Standards and Aged Care Quality Standards Director and External Auditor 3-yearly
· Self-assessment against the NDIS Terms of Business and Guide to Suitability. Director Annually; March
· Review Continuous Improvement Plan and Complaints Register for trends and actions taken for continuous improvement Director Quarterly
·  Service Planning and Delivery days, involving clients and other stakeholders* Director Six-monthly; June and December
·  Internal privacy audits Director Annually; March
Reporting Accountabilities
Service Delivery · Preparation and submission of reports required under any contractual arrangements Director As per contractual arrangements
Legislative · Preparation of annual report, including compliance with the Carer Recognition Act 2010 (Cwlth) Director Annually; following end of financial year
Financial · Quarterly and End of Financial Year Reporting Director Quarterly (March, June, September and December) and Annually (July)
Risk Management
Risk Management · Review of Risk Management and Risk Treatment Plans Director Quarterly
Workplace Health and Safety
Staff and Client Safety · Review of incidents to identify risks and areas for improvement Director Quarterly
· Safety compliance audits against documented WHS procedures, e.g. fire safety, electrical equipment, client safety – Director

-Fire Department

-Electrician

Six-monthly; July and January
·  Internal and external inspections including physical and digital access audits Director Annually; December
Assets Management
Assets · Review Assets Register

· Update warranty and depreciation details

· Audit maintenance schedules for continuing value and usefulness

Director Annually, July
Records Management
Financial and Client Management Systems · Random survey of financial accounts and client records against policies and procedures. Director Annually, July
Contractors and Suppliers
Contractors and Suppliers · Review supplier contract details, performance, costs and quality of service Director Annually, July
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

VEHICLE SAFETY POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code MVP001.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

To ensure that the use of motor vehicles in the course of performing work duties with Holistic Home Care is safe and complies with legislative requirements.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, and any additional staff, students, contractors and volunteers. It should be read in conjunction with the Workplace Health and Safety Policy and Procedure.

2.0 POLICY

The health and safety of all Holistic Home Care staff, volunteers, contractors, clients and visitors are of utmost importance, including when service delivery requires the use of vehicles.

3.0 PROCEDURE

  • All vehicles used on Holistic Home Care business must be maintained in a roadworthy condition. Staff are required to sign the Private Motor Vehicles Details Form for each private vehicle used on Holistic Home Care business to confirm the vehicle is registered and roadworthy.
  • Staff shall not drive a vehicle on Holistic Home Care business unless they hold a current Driver’s Licence. There are no circumstances under which staff should not comply with all road and traffic rules when undertaking work duties.
  • Staff must advise their supervisor in writing of any motoring offences which may disqualify them from driving legally as soon as possible after notification by the relevant authority.

 

Compliance with Road Rules

Staff must be aware of, and comply with, all road and traffic rules when driving a company vehicle, or driving a private vehicle for Holistic Home Care business including:

  • wearing of seatbelts, including expander belts where required (both driver and passengers);
  • observing speed limits, traffic lights and road signs;
  • not driving when under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or prescription medication which may affect driving ability.
  • not using a hand held mobile phone while the vehicle is moving, or is stationary but not parked.

Staff are responsible for any traffic or parking infringements they incur while driving a private vehicle on Holistic Home Care business.

 

Emergency Transport

Company or private vehicles should not be used for emergency transport.  An ambulance or other emergency response vehicle should always be called in an emergency.

 

Client Transport

Clients should not be transported if there is any concern for the safety of the driver or passengers, for example, concern related to a client distracting the driver. The driver is in charge of the vehicle and takes responsibility for how people behave in the vehicle.  Where there is any concern about the behaviour of passengers, staff should pull over and park the vehicle.

As the driver of the vehicle, staff may determine the number of passengers they are comfortable transporting, however this must not exceed the allowable number for the vehicle being driven. The vehicle must have seat restraints for all passengers carried. Where appropriate restraints are not fitted (e.g. baby capsule or bolster seat for client’s child), staff must not transport the client; rather, they should organise a taxi or public transport.

Breakdowns and Accidents

In the event of any accident which involves injury or property damage, staff should inform the Director as soon as practicable.

An Incident Report must be completed for all motor vehicle accidents, including minor ones.

Staff are encouraged to comprehensively insure their vehicle as Holistic Home Care does not accept responsibility for any damage which might occur to staff vehicles.

In the event of a breakdown, staff should contact their Roadside Assistance provider and inform their supervisor as soon as practicable. Should the staff member experience a breakdown while providing a service for a client, the staff member will discuss the appropriate action with their supervisor.

 

Smoke Free Environment

Smoking is prohibited in company and private vehicles when transporting passengers on Holistic Home Care business.  Where staff do smoke in their private vehicle, they are responsible for ensuring the air is clear of smoke prior to transporting passengers.

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND DELEGATIONS POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code FMP001.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 10 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

The Financial Management and Delegations Policy guides how Holistic Home Care safeguards and makes the best use of the funds it manages by: providing guidelines for who can approve expenditure; ensuring that financial records are kept to a proper standard; and preventing fraud or mismanagement.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

2.0 DEFINITIONS

Assets – non-consumable items of tangible property (including fixtures) that have a service life greater than one year. Assets can include:

  • non-medical equipment;
  • equipment or aids to support clients;
  • electronic equipment (such as computers);
  • furniture; and
  • motor vehicles.

Fraud – dishonest activity causing actual or potential financial loss to any person or entity including theft of money or other property by staff members or people external to the entity and where deception is used at the time, immediately before or immediately following the activity. This also includes the deliberate falsification, concealment, destruction or use of falsified documentation used or intended for use for a non-business purpose or the improper use of information or position for financial benefit.[2]

Corruption – dishonest activity in which a Director, executive manager, manager, staff member or contractor of an entity acts contrary to the interests of the entity and abuses his/her position of trust in order to achieve gain or advantage for themselves or for another person or entity.[3]

 

3.0 POLICY

  • Holistic Home Care is committed to effective management of its finances and the prevention of fraud or mismanagement of its funds. Holistic Home Care will maintain financial management and accounting systems that:
  • are transparent and accountable;
  • allow for the keeping of full and accurate records;
  • allow budgeting and reporting on an accrual basis;
  • meet applicable Australian Accounting Standards; and
  • are consistent with the financial compliance and reporting requirements for any of the organisation’s funding arrangements.
  • Holistic Home Care will:
  • prepare financial statements according to the Australian Accounting Standards; and
  • have its accounts and records audited in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards.

4.0 PROCEDURE

Approvals and Delegations

  • Holistic Home Care complies with the Australian Accounting Standards issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board. The Director will keep up-to-date with changes to these standards to ensure compliance.
  • The Director will maintain a Chart of Accounts for the entire business that ensures a consistent reporting structure, meets budget management needs and conforms with the National Australian Standard Chart of Accounts.
  • The Director will continuously monitor the financial position of the organisation to minimise the risk of fraud and ensure that expenditure complies with the budget, is accounted for correctly, and is properly authorised prior to expenditure being incurred.
  • The Director will maintain a Register of Bank Accounts for the entire business, containing holding bank details, open and close dates, interest rates, fees, credit and debit card holders and expiry dates for credit cards.
  • The Director has responsibility for all expenditure.
  • Access to Internet Banking and EFT transfers is restricted to the Director and controlled by a user ID and password, both of which must remain confidential, and under no circumstances be divulged to anyone else.
  • Receipts for all expenditure must be provided to and retained by the Director.
  • The Director will authorise and make reimbursement payments for staff work-related expenses.
  • The Director will maintain a Petty Cash float of $250.00. This will be kept in a safe or lockable cabinet. Receipts must accompany all claims for expenditure.

Bank Accounts

  • The Director is the signatory for Holistic Home Care’s bank accounts.
  • The Director (or delegate) will maintain a Contingency Bank Account for the organisation, to provide cash interest and to deposit:
  • staff accruals;
  • surplus funds;
  • long service leave, sick leave and accumulated annual leave entitlements;
  • assets replacement funds;
  • training funds; and
  • maintenance funds.
  • The Director (or delegate) will ensure that all debts are settled in a timely manner and will not allow ordinary operating expenses to become undischarged debts beyond a three-month period from the time they were incurred.
  • The Director will manage the Contingency Account. It will be reconciled monthly and funds can only be accessed with the signature of the Director.

Assets

  • Details of all assets owned by Holistic Home Care will be recorded in the Asset Register.
  • When an asset is sold or otherwise disposed of, the details of the disposal (such as sale proceeds) will be recorded in the financial records and recorded in the Asset Register.
  • Where an asset is lost, damaged, or destroyed Holistic Home Care will repair or replace the asset if it is still required.
  • Asset depreciation will be recorded in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards.

Insurances

  • The Director is responsible for ensuring all people and equipment associated with Holistic Home Care’s operations are covered by relevant insurances.
  • The Director will maintain an Insurances Register, noting the type of insurance, the name and number of the policy, the annual premium and expiry date of the current policy.
  • The Director will ensure that costs of insurance reflect the market situation and that policies are renewed no less than 14 days before expiry.

Budget processes

  • The Director will prepare an annual itemised budget for the forthcoming financial year in consultation with an independent accountant. This will be endorsed by the Director by no later than July of the financial year.
  • The budget will be developed based on analysis of the current and previous year’s income and expenditure, taking into consideration any known changes to funding arrangements.
  • The Director will set annual budgets for the programs under their control, according to the available funding.
  • All monies received by the organisation must be recorded.
  • The Director will prepare a quarterly report of expenditure against the budget.
  • The Director (or delegate) will prepare Financial Statements for submission to funding bodies at required intervals as specified in any funding contracts. These will be endorsed by the Director and independent accountant prior to submission where required.
  • The Director (or delegate) will conduct a financial reconciliation annually in consultation with the independent accountant and prepare a Financial Report for the Director.
  • The Financial Report will include:
  • Profit & Loss year to date;
  • Balance Sheet for the year to date;
  • General Ledger for the year to date; and
  • Budget vs. Actual for the year to date.
  • In each new financial year, the Director will ensure that the previous year’s financials are documented, archived and labelled.
  • Other specific areas of financial management, such as Asset Management and Payroll, will be managed in accordance with general policies and procedures for these areas.

Reporting

  • Holistic Home Care will comply with the Australian Equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards (AIFRS).

Payroll

  • Where staff are employed, payroll processes will be overseen by the Director. Staff will submit the required documentation prior to the closing of the payroll period in order for salaries to be paid.
  • Payment advice will be issued to staff by email following the processes of the fortnightly pay.

Tax Obligations and Superannuation

  • Tax installments must be deducted for all payments of salary in accordance with details provided by staff member via Tax Declaration Form.
  • Payment Advices covering the preceding year are to be provided to ATO by 21 July annually. These should include any “grossing up” of salary packaging component relevant to the FBT year (where relevant).
  • Superannuation obligations must be met at the end of each month.
  • On a monthly basis, the ATO must receive Holistic Home Care’s group taxation payments.
  • An accurate sum of taxation held for the month period must be recorded and forwarded to the ATO.

Fraud and Corruption Control

  • Holistic Home Care fraud and corruption prevention activities include:
  • The Director will raise general awareness amongst staff (where applicable) about what fraudulent practices are, identifying potential fraud, how to report fraud and to make it very clear that fraudulent practices within Holistic Home Care will not be tolerated;
  • Holistic Home Care’s employment screening processes (see Human Resources Policy and Procedure); and
  • staff training.
  • All instances of suspected fraud or corruption report must be reported to:
  • the Director (unless that person may be implicated); or
  • All reports of fraud or corruption should be treated in confidence.
  • When a report or allegation of fraud or corruption is received, every effort must be made to deal with such reports quickly and decisively.
  • The Director (or delegate) will record all reports of actual and suspected fraud or corruption, noting the nature of the report, the time received and remedial actions planned and taken. A copy of these records shall be provided to the relevant authorities upon their request.
  • In examining cases of suspected fraud, management and staff must ensure that their inquiries do not prejudice any subsequent investigation. If in doubt, do not pursue any further investigations and the Director shall contact the Police.
  • All cases should be treated in confidence and on a need-to-know basis. False rumours and innuendo must be avoided to protect reputations of innocent people. It is also important to avoid alerting any person who may be suspected of fraud, or who is under investigation. This is necessary to minimise the chance of a cover up or of vital evidence being destroyed.
  • All discipline or misconduct investigations relating to Holistic Home Care staff will be conducted in accordance with the Human Resources Policy and Procedure.

 

National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

  • The Director will ensure that all of Holistic Home Care’s financial arrangements regarding NDIS service delivery comply with:
  • the NDIS Act 2013 (Cwth), the NDIS Rules, all relevant NDIS guidelines, and all policies issued by the NDIA including the NDIS Terms of Business and Guide to Suitability; and
  • any other relevant Commonwealth or State law or other requirements.
  • The Director will develop pricing structures for Holistic Home Care’s services that align with the price controls and quoting requirements in place for NDIS supports, in accordance with the NDIS VIC/NSW/QLD/TAS Price Guide.
  • The Director (or delegate) will maintain full and accurate accounts and financial records of the supports delivered to NDIS participants, along with records of all Service Agreements.
  • All financial transactions, including receipts and payments related NDIS service provision, must be clearly identifiable and easily tracked within Holistic Home Care’s financial accounts.
  • Holistic Home Care’s accounts and financial records will be maintained on a regular basis and in such detail that the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) is able to accurately ascertain the quantity, type and duration of support delivered.
  • Financial records and accounts relating to NDIS service provision will be retained for a period of no less than 7 years from the date of issue.
  • The retention of all records will also comply with all relevant statutes, regulations, by-laws and requirements of any Commonwealth, State or Local Authority.

 

Service Agreements

  • A NDIS Service Agreement will be used to formalise the supports Holistic Home Care will provide NDIS participants.
  • A Home Care Agreement will be used to formalise the supports Holistic Home Care will provide to Aged Care Home Care participants.
  • Holistic Home Care will work collaboratively with clients and their supporters to develop their Service Agreement.
  • Holistic Home Care will declare prices to all clients before providing services and include all fees Service Agreements along with detailed information about the supports to be provided. Fees for NDIS services charged will not exceed the price controls set by the NDIA. Fees for Home Care will be in accordance with the Schedule of Fees and Charges for Residential and Home Care
  • No other charges will be added to the cost of supports provided, including credit card surcharges, additional fees such as ‘gap’ fees, late payment fees or cancellation fees.
  • Service Agreements will clearly set out the costs to be paid for supports, when delivery of supports is to be performed and the method of payment required. See the Assessment, Planning and Review Policy and Procedure for more information on what the Service Agreement will contain.
  • The client must sign the Service Agreement/Home Care Agreement before service delivery can commence.
  • Through its invoicing and statement arrangements, Holistic Home Care will ensure that clients are regularly provided with details of services delivered and the amount charged for those services.
  • Service Agreements will be consistent with the NDIS’ pricing arrangements, guidelines and the requirements of the A New Tax System (Goods and Service Tax) Act 1999 regarding the application of the GST.
  • Clients, their supporters and other stakeholders have access to the organisation’s feedback, compliments and complaints processes to raise issues about financial management of their supports without fear of retribution.

 

Fee Payments

  • Accounts are calculated each week and are to be paid weekly.
  • Receipts will be provided at time of payment and reprints provided upon request.
  • Fees are to be paid by cheque, EFTPOS, online, direct bank transfer or credit card, either weekly as supports are provided. Cash will not be kept on the premises and Holistic Home Care will not accept cash payments.
  • Statements of services provided will be issued by mail or email at the beginning of each quarter for the supports provided in the previous quarter.
  • Holistic Home Care will submit claims for payment to the NDIA within a reasonable timeframe, and no later than 60 days for the end of the support booking.

 

Outstanding Accounts

  • Where a client’s fees are outstanding for more than one week, the Director (or delegate) will call them requesting payment.
  • Where fees are outstanding for two weeks, provision of supports will be cancelled.
  • Where a client has difficulty paying their fees, they are encouraged to discuss this with Holistic Home Care so that mutually acceptable payment arrangements can be put in place.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code QMP001.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

The Continuous Improvement Policy guides how Holistic Home Care constantly assesses the organisation and services to ensure that Holistic Home Care is providing the best possible quality of services to clients and the most efficient and accountable management practices.

This policy and procedure applies to all staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

  • DEFINITIONS

Continuous Improvement describes the ongoing effort of an organisation to improve services, systems, processes or products to maximise benefits for its clients. This also means adapting to changing needs of its community or clients.[4]

Evidence: Information and materials that demonstrate the organisation’s achievements, its openness to client and staff feedback, and its commitment to improvement.

  • POLICY
  • Holistic Home Care is committed to quality, innovation and promoting a culture of continuous improvement in its governance, service management and service delivery.
  • Holistic Home Care values feedback and input from staff, clients and other relevant stakeholders in its continuous improvement activities to ensure services remain of a high quality and continue to meet client need.

 

  • PROCEDURE
  • The Director will specifically focus on continuous improvement by reviewing the organisation’s performance annually.
  • The Director is responsible for instigating, monitoring and implementing internal reviews and external audits, in accordance with its Internal Review and External Audit Schedule.
  • Stakeholder representatives (clients, their families, friends, carers and advocates) will be included in each formal review or audit procedure undertaken by the organisation.
  • All Policies and Procedures will be reviewed according to the QMS Document Review Schedule and incorporate staff and stakeholder feedback (where appropriate).
  • Staff are responsible for identifying and actioning opportunities for continuous improvement. This responsibility will be discussed in their formal induction, in training processes, and in ongoing workplace practices.
  • The agenda for team meetings will include a standing item on continuous improvement (including staff and client feedback and complaints).

 

Continuous Improvement Plan

  • All continuous improvement issues or opportunities identified will be reported to and tracked by the Director (or delegate) in the Continuous Improvement Plan.
  • The Continuous Improvement Plan is a ‘living document’, updated as improvements are identified. For any specific improvement identified, the Plan includes the:
  • improvement identified;
  • action to be taken;
  • person responsible for actioning;
  • staff, client or other stakeholder participation required and undertaken;
  • date of completion; and
  • implementation review date.
  • The Continuous Improvement Plan will also track improvements identified in regular reviews of:
  • feedback, complaints and dispute resolution processes involving clients, their families, carers and advocates, staff (where applicable), other service providers, the NDIA and the Queensland Government, as recorded in the Complaints Register;
  • feedback and improvement activities offered to clients, families, carers and advocates;
  • planning, service delivery, plan review, exit, service refusal and referral information;
  • results from internal reviews and external audits;
  • organisational performance against Holistic Home Care’s Vision, Mission and KPIs as well as the Human Services Standards;
  • strategic and operational planning;
  • learning and reflection opportunities for staff;
  • records of incidents including any involving clients or Workplace Health and Safety;
  • staff supervision and performance appraisal processes and outcomes;
  • analysis of internal reporting and data provided to the NDIA, the Queensland government and other agencies;
  • learnings from collaborative relationships with similar organisations and networks;
  • specific program and project reviews and evaluations undertaken at the direction of the Director; and
  • on the job and formal training and professional development undertaken by staff.
  • All service planning, delivery and evaluation activities will include staff, client and other stakeholders and their feedback.
  • Clients are encouraged to provide feedback in relation to service development and organisational management. This may include contributing feedback, having complaints heard, consultation processes, and involvement in committees.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

RECORDS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code QMP002.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure guides the management of information, both paper based and electronic, to meet the accountability and compliance requirements, and ensure efficiency and business continuity.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, and any additional staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

 

2.0 DEFINITIONS

Documents – all manuals, reference books, registers and files in hard copy or electronic data format.

Forms – all single or multi-part paper work that has an approved layout used to record information.  When data is recorded on forms they become records.  Forms may be computer generated or pre-printed.

Records – Records are generated as a result of some activity and are a statement of facts existing at the time and cannot be revised.  Superseded documents (or revised documents) can become records.

Records Management – the efficient and systematic control of the creation, receipt, maintenance, use and disposal of records, including processes for capturing and maintaining evidence of and information about business activities and transactions in the form of records.

Information – Knowledge communicated or received. The result of processing, gathering, manipulating and organising data in a way that adds to the knowledge of the receiver.

Information management – supports effective and efficient management of information and is concerned with the creation, production, collection, organisation, storage, protection, retrieval and dissemination of information resources that may be in any format and available from internal or external sources.

 

3.0 POLICY

  • Holistic Home Care is committed to maintaining clear and accountable information systems to support and record management processes and service delivery to clients, and which protect rights of staff and clients with regard to privacy and confidentiality.

 

 

 

4.0 PROCEDURE

Policies and Procedures

  • Holistic Home Care maintains a register of policies, procedures, and forms, that have been approved for use by the Director (Quality Management System Document Review Schedule).
  • Only the Director may amend or approve these documents.
  • Staff and clients are encouraged to identify improvements to approved policies. Any suggested improvement will be considered by the Director (or delegate) and where approved, the Director will ensure the policy is updated and all staff are informed of this change.
  • The QMS Document Register will be updated to reflect any approved amendments, and maintain version control of approved documentation.
  • Superseded documents must be immediately removed from circulation and

Personal Information

  • All documents and electronic records that contain private and confidential information about clients, staff, or the organisation, will be retained in locked cabinets with access restricted to the Director (or delegate). A secure filing system for paper and electronic documents and records will be maintained.

 

Storage and Access

  • All hard copy records are kept in appropriate conditions and protected from known risks, degradation and unauthorised access.
  • Electronic records are stored securely, password protected and are backed up regularly.
  • Where client files are transported out of the office, the records should be moved securely in a non-transparent container (eg. locked briefcase).

 

Archiving

  • Holistic Home Care will maintain a secure archive system for records and information no longer in use. Contents of individual archive boxes will be attached to the outside of each box and kept for the period specified in relevant legislation. Client files will be kept for a period of seven (7) years and general correspondence and documents for two (2) years.
  • Financial records will be archived in order of financial year in which they occur and kept for a minimum period of seven (7) years.
  • Client records, files and information will be stored, accessed and used in accordance with Holistic Home Care’s policies on privacy and confidentiality.
  • Staff files (including paid staff and volunteers) will be stored securely with access limited to the Director. Personnel files of ex-staff members will be kept on file for a period of seven (7) years.
  • Records which may be required for the federal Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse must not be destroyed even if there is a disposal authorisation in place.
  • Obsolete documents containing personal information will be shredded or disposed of in such a way that no identifying information is visible.

 

Freedom of Information

  • Holistic Home Care will provide clients and government agencies access to records in accordance with any applicable legislation, including Freedom of Information legislation.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

RISK MANAGEMENT POLICY AND PROCEDURE

Policy Code RMP001.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure guides how Holistic Home Care assesses and responds to risks which are inevitably encountered in managing and delivering services.

This policy and procedure applies to all staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

2.0 DEFINITIONS

Risk “a possible effect on an expected outcome.” More specifically, ‘risk’ indicates a potential danger to the organisation, to the success of its services, strategies, projects and processes, its financial viability, its reputation, or the health and safety of its clients and staff.

Risk assessment – the process in which risk is identified, analysed and evaluated.

Risk Managementcoordinated activities to direct and control an organisation with regard to risk.

Risk treatment – a measure, process or system that eliminates a risk where possible or, if not possible, reduces the risk so far as is reasonably practicable.

 

3.0 POLICY

  • Holistic Home Care is committed to the responsible identification and management of risks which may arise during the delivery of services and the general management of the organisation, including risks relating to compliance, finance, safety and health, environmental risk and operational risk.
  • The Director is ultimately responsible for identifying and managing risks that impact the organisation. Nonetheless, Holistic Home Care
  • expects all staff (where employed) to responsibly minimise risks to themselves and others, and report hazards and other risks as soon as they are noticed;
  • values the risk assessments, evaluations and recommendations gathered from internal and external audits and from stakeholder feedback.
  • Holistic Home Care’s approach to risk management, including its Risk Management Model and Principles, is aligned with Australian and New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 31000:2009 (Risk Management Principles and Guidelines).

4.0 PROCEDURE

Overview

  • The Risk Management Process involves five steps:
  • Identify: Identify the risk events that may prevent or delay the achievement of strategic goals and objectives.
  • Analyse: Outline the causes, impacts and existing treatments in order to assess the consequence and likelihood of the risk and determine the risk rating.
  • Treat: Implement existing and future treatments to prevent or mitigate the risk.
  • Monitor: Continually monitor and evaluate the risks and treatments to maintain the effectiveness and appropriateness of the organisation’s risk management.
  • Report: Provide regular reports and updates in order to assure the organisation and its stakeholders that risks are being appropriately managed and treated.

Identifying and Analysing Risk

Identifying risk means considering:

  • factors that impact positively or negatively; and
  • factors that make Holistic Home Care’s strategic priorities and goals susceptible to risk.

Staff are encouraged to identify hazards and to report them to supervisors and the Director.

Holistic Home Care uses the following 3 Step risk assessment:

  • Identify the degree of risk in a particular sector of operations
  • Estimate the likelihood of an event occurring
  • calculate a Risk Rating

See Risk Assessment Matrixes below.

 

 

Step 1. Qualitative Measure of Consequence or Impact

Use the example table below to estimate the consequence of risks in a particular sector of operation.

Exposure Category: indicates the severity of a negative event.

Consequence Category: indicates the sector in which risk occurs.

Exposure

Category

1.

Insignificant

2.

Minor

3.

Moderate

4.

Major

5.

Catastrophic

Consequence Category A: HR & Safety Workforce injury – no lost time.

No health effect.

No staff turnover

No IR issues, strikes, bans.

Workforce treatment required.

Lost time (1-3 days).

Minimal health effect.

Staff disgruntlement/absent for 1 – 2 days

Minimal IR issues, strikes ,bans

Staff turnover >10% < 15% due to IR issues

Workforce injury.

Lost time (4 – 30 days).

Short-term health effect

Poor staff performance

Minor IR issues

>15 % < 20% staff turnover due to IR issues

No strikes and bans

Serious workforce injuries

Lost time > 1 month.

Permanent disability

IR issues stopping work.

>20% < 30% staff turnover due to IR issues >5 < 10 days strikes and/or bans

Fatality; significant permanent
disablement or permanent deleterious health effect.

>30% staff turnover

IR legal disputes

>10 days strikes and bans

B: Finance & Assets Reduced income or increased costs <0.5%

Almost negligible damage to assets.

No interruption to operations

Reduced income or increased costs

0.5%>  <2.5%

Minor asset damage.

<5 days interruption to parts of the operations

Reduced income or increased costs

2.5%>  <5%

Severe asset damage.

< 30 days interruption to parts of the operations

Reduced income or increased costs

5%>  <10% Major system damage. 30> <60 days interruption to parts of the operations

Reduced income or increased costs >10%.

Loss of system or Plant

>60 days interruption to operations,

C: Governance No measurable operational impact.

Do not initiate Business Continuity (BC) / Emergency & Disaster Management Plan (E&DMP)

No impact on new business/projects.

No impact on Board oversight.

Minor service interruption localised disruption.

May need to initiate Business Continuity (BC) / Emergency & Disaster Management Plan (E&DMP)

No impact on new business/projects.

No impact on Board oversight.

Significant degradation of operations, multiple business areas affecting sustainable operations.
Need to initiate Business Continuity (BC) / Emergency & Disaster Management Plan (E&DMP)

Some impact on new business/projects.

Board to be notified <2 days.

Significant degradation of operations, multiple business areas affecting sustainable operations.
Immediate actioning of Business Continuity (BC) / Emergency & Disaster Management Plan (E&DMP)

Delayed Impact on new business/projects.

Board to be notified immediately.

Widespread or total degradation of operations, cross functional impact.

Operational performance

Immediate actioning of Business Continuity (BC) / Emergency & Disaster Management Plan (E&DMP)

New business / projects lost.

Board and SMT to action immediately

D: Client Care No impact, no profile or no negative publicity item.

No/minimal health impact to consumers (residents/clients)

Identified areas of need for internal quality

Community / Stakeholders / Client adverse impact on trust & credibility of clinical care service delivery is nil.

Assets, business or services are temporarily unavailable i.e. < 2 hours.

Substantiated, low impact, low negative publicity.

Some Community/ Stakeholders / Client impact on trust and credibility of clinical care service delivery.

Assets, business or services are not available for > 2 < 7 hours.

Minor injuries managed internally

Minor incident/recommendation for improvement as a result of an external review.

Substantiated, impact to reputation, moderate impact, moderate negative publicity.

Community / Stakeholder / Client impact on trust and credibility of clinical care service delivery is in doubt as a result as evidenced by a formal complaint from a stakeholder.

Resident injury requiring medical treatment/interventions.

Result of internal audits – 80% of compliance in designated areas.

Unmet outcomes in 1 standard.

Assets, business or services, including some critical are not available for > 24 < 48 hours

Substantiated, public embarrassment.
High impact, high negative news profile. Third party actions.

Resident injury resulting in hospitalisation.

Result of internal audits – below 70% of compliance in the designated categories.

Unmet outcomes in more than 1 standard.

Community / Stakeholder / Client impact on trust and credibility of clinical care service is no longer there

Critical assets or services are not available for >48 hours < 1 week.

Substantiated negative public media involvement.
High impact, high negative news profile. Third party actions.

Resident injury resulting in death.

Result of internal audits – below 60% of compliance in the designated categories.

Sanctions applied.

Community / Stakeholder / Client impact on trust and credibility of clinical care service is no longer there

Critical assets or services are not available for >48 hours < 1 week

E: Strategic No damage to reputation & image externally

No impact on achievement of strategic objectives / KPIs.

No changes in political/customer/ stakeholders expectations

Minimal changes in government funding/policy resulting in reduced funding of > .05%

Minimal damage to reputation & image externally

Little impact on achievement of strategic objectives / KPIs.

Slight changes in political/customer/ stakeholders expectations

Minimal changes in government funding/policy resulting in reduced funding 0.5%> < 2.5%

Noticeable damage to reputation & image externally

Non achievement of few strategic objectives / KPIs.

Changes in political/customer/ stakeholders expectations influencing some elements of Strategic Plan

Changes in government funding/policy resulting in reduced funding 2.5%>  <5%

Clear & repeated damage to reputation & image externally

Non achievement of core strategic objectives / KPIs.

Changes in political/customer/ stakeholders expectations influencing core elements of Strategic Plan

Changes in government funding/policy resulting in significant reduced funding 5%>  <10%

High level and repeated damage to reputation & image externally

Non achievement of significant strategic objectives / KPIs.

Changes in political/customer/ stakeholders expectations influencing all elements of Strategic Plan

Changes in government funding/policy resulting in significant reduced funding >10%

F:  Compliance & Legal Non-compliance or non-conformance with current policies/procedures are insignificant in nature with no disruption to performance of operations.

Changes in Local, State, Federal government regulations/legislation have no impact.

Full compliance with Federal & State health & environmental legislation

Full compliance with Industry standards.

No Litigation, public and professional liability costs.  No impact on Contractual and Commercial risks.

Non-compliance or regulatory breach with current policies/procedures- requires attention or corrective actions.

Changes in Local, State, Federal government regulations/legislation have minimal impact.

Minor non-compliance with Federal & State health & environmental legislation but non-reportable.

Minor non-compliance with Federal & State health & environmental legislation but non-reportable

Ability to measure non-conformance to best practice or standards and take corrective actions

No Litigation, public and professional liability costs.  No impact on Contractual and Commercial risks.

Non-compliance or regulatory breach with current policies/procedures requires significant attention or corrective actions.

Changes in Local, State, Federal government regulations/legislation have some impact on operations

Moderate non-compliance with Federal & State health & environmental legislation and/or

Moderate non-compliance with Federal & State health & environmental legislation hence
Reporting required to third parties / external regulators.

Non-conformance to best practice or standards will attract attention if subject to third party review (including internal audit)

Possible Litigation, public and professional liability costs.  Moderate impact on Contractual and Commercial risks.

Non-compliance or regulatory breach with current policies/procedures requires immediate/significant attention or corrective actions.

Changes in Local, State, Federal government regulations/legislation immediately impact on business operations

Major non-compliance with Federal & State health & environmental legislation and/or

Major non-compliance with Federal & State health & environmental legislation hence
Non-compliance, regulatory breach or non-conformance to best practice or standards results in restriction on business and/or notice of prosecution and fines.

Lengthy Litigation, public and professional liability costs.  Contractual and Commercial risks are not contained.

Changes in Local, State, Federal government regulations/legislation immediately restricts/ceases  business operations

Serious non-compliance with Federal & State health & environmental legislation and/or

Serious non-compliance with Federal & State health & environmental legislation hence

Non-compliance results in cancellation or loss of business operations.

Non-compliance, regulatory breach or non-conformance results in class actions, prosecution and fines.

Action being undertaken against Director and/or Officers with possibility of severe penalties.

Step 2.

Use the table below to estimate the likelihood that an event will occur.

Probability Descriptor Example of Description Frequency
A Almost Certain The event is expected to occur in most circumstances Once per week
B Likely The event will probably occur in most circumstances Monthly
C Moderate The event should occur at some time 6 monthly
D Unlikely The event could occur at some time Within a year
E Rare The event may occur only in exceptional circumstances Once a year

Step 3

Use the table below to determine the Risk Rating using indicators from Tables 1 & 2

Likelihood Rating Consequence Rating
1

Insignificant

2

Minor

3

Moderate

4

Major

5

Extreme

A – Certain High High Extreme Extreme Extreme
B – Likely Medium High High Extreme Extreme
C – Possible Medium Medium High High Extreme
D – Unlikely Low Medium Medium High High
E – Rare Low Low Medium Medium High

 

Holistic Home Care will not accept a residual risk rating above the bold line.

Implementing Controls and Treatments:

  • With the risk rating determined, it is necessary to consider the effectiveness of the controls that are already in place to manage the risk, and whether additional controls may be required.
  • Holistic Home Care will accept and monitor lower priority risks.
  • For those risks identified as moderate or higher, we need to consider the appropriate risk treatment options that will reduce the risk rating to an acceptable level.
  • Controls are strategies to manage risk balanced against the cost and inconvenience of the control. Common controls include:
  • staff training;
  • provision of information;
  • the use of safe or safer equipment;
  • maintaining adequate insurance;
  • changes in procedures or practices; and
  • personal checks including referee checks, driver’s licences, motor vehicle registrations, professional registrations, criminal history checks etc.
  • All identified risks and appropriate controls must be recorded on the Risk Register.

 

Monitoring and Reporting Risk

Regular monitoring and review of the performance of the risk management system is conducted, and includes changes to business initiatives and other internal processes:

Risk register – the organisational risk register is a living document that is updated regularly by the Director.

Risk assessments should be completed quarterly (see Internal Review and External Audit Schedule). Controls are monitored for effectiveness against the impact and likelihood ratings. Risk assessments are also required to be completed for each client on the commencement of service. These risk assessments should be reviewed, at a minimum, quarterly.

  • All staff are responsible for managing risk within their areas of influence.
  • Upon commencement, all staff, students and contractors will undergo Induction, which will include risk management training.
  • Where staff are employed, regular Performance Reviews will assess staff awareness of this policy and procedure and their roles and responsibilities in respect to risk management. Additional on-the-job and formal training will be provided where required.
  • The Director will ensure that all necessary insurance policies are in place to protect Holistic Home Care as an organisation, as well as its Director, staff, volunteers, clients, contractors and visitors.
  • The Director will foster a risk aware service culture by including risk awareness and identification on agendas for staff meetings (where applicable).
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

HUMAN RESOURCES POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code HRP001.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure sets out recruitment and selection, staff management and exit procedures and demonstrates Holistic Home Care’s commitment to effective, transparent and fair human resources practices.

This policy and procedure applies to the staff, students, and volunteers.

2.0 RISK

Multiple risks are associated with employing or contracting staff. These risks, and their risk treatments, include the following:

 

Risk to clients (abuse):

  • People with disabilities are more vulnerable to abuse, neglect and exploitation than the general population. Clients are put at risk where staff are not suitable for their roles. The risk treatment strategies to ensure client safety include compliance with mandatory staff screening and role risk assessment requirements under the NDIS, specified below. Clients are also at risk of neglect and the effects of staff misconceptions about what is reasonable in interpersonal interactions. The Behaviour Support and Restrictive Interventions Policy and Procedure, Staff Code of Conduct and Duty of Care Policy and Procedure outline prohibited practices and establish expectations for personal conduct and levels of care. Encouraging clients to speak out against mistreatment is encouraged and the processes for managing complaints are addressed in the Feedback and Complaints Policy and Procedure. The processes for managing staff misconduct are outlined in this policy.
  • In compliance with Chapter 8 of the Working with Children (Risk Management and Screening) Act 2000, Section 3 of the Working with Children (Risk Management and Screening) Regulation 2011, and Section 49 of the Disability Services Act (2006), Holistic Home Care maintains the following processes as part of a risk management strategy for the promotion of client wellbeing and protection from abuse, neglect and exploitation:
    • Child Safe Code of Conduct
    • Child Safe Policy
    • Preventing and Responding to Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation Policy
    • Incident Management Policy
    • Maintenance of a Human Resources compliance database, which captures the status of a staff member’s Yellow and Blue Cards, including their expiry date.
    • Inclusion of this risk management strategy in Induction.
  • Where staff/volunteers have commenced their engagement without a positive notice, the Director will ensure that the following processes are in place to mitigate risk while awaiting the outcome of the Mandatory Check:
    • A National Police Check must have been completed prior to commencement of employment and any client contact.
    • Regular supervision, including shadow shifts are to occur to ensure that the new staff member/volunteer is aware of, and understands their obligations and responsibilities in relation to safety and for their behavior to be monitored to ensure compliance with the Child Safe Code of Conduct.
    • Regular feedback will be sought from clients to assist the assessment of new staff/volunteers.
  • Should there be a potential, perceived or actual breach of the risk management strategy, the Director must be informed immediately. The Director will address the issue as per the Incident Management Policy, this Human Resources Policy and any other relevant procedure.
  • Any identified high risk activities and special events must have a specific Risk Assessment completed.
  • This risk management strategy will be communicated to relevant parties, including clients, parents/family members and staff/volunteers.
  • These processes are reviewed annually.

 

Risk to clients (injury):

  • Risk of injury to clients can be minimised by ensuring staff are adequately trained to perform their role (this policy).

 

Risk to staff:

  • Staff are at risk of unfair allegations. See the Preventing and Responding to Abuse Policy and Procedure for guidance on procedural fairness and confidentiality in investigating claims of abuse.

 

Risk to the organisation:

  • Failing to correctly source and manage staff presents potentially serious risk to the organisation. Risk, here, refers to both the possibility of negative effects (above) and the failure to realise opportunity by appropriately managing talented staff. Staff monitoring, training and opportunities for advancement (as appropriate) are addressed in this policy.

 

 

 

3.0 DEFINITIONS

Childrelated work – work in providing respite care or other support services primarily for children with a disability unless the work does not ordinarily involve contact with children for extended periods without other adults being present.

Clearance a decision in response to an application for an NDIS worker screening check that clears the applicant to work with people with disability in a risk assessed role, when that decision is current and operative. (See also Exclusion)

Confidential Information/data – Records and information about a child are considered confidential if they are of a sensitive nature in relation to their health and well-being and the information has been provided in confidence. Where information held is simply the name, address or other contact details of children they are not considered confidential.

Contact all ways of interacting with a person with disability, including: physical contact (such as touch), face-to-face contact, oral communication, written communication and electronic communication. (See also More than incidental contact)

Exclusion – a decision (however described) under the NDIS worker screening legislation of a jurisdiction, in response to an application for an NDIS worker screening check, which has the effect that the applicant is excluded from working in a risk assessed role with people with disability.  This means that, even if a person is subject to an exclusion, they are not excluded from working with people with disability in roles other than risk assessed roles with a registered NDIS provider. (See also Clearance)

Interim bar – an interim decision made under the NDIS worker screening legislation of a jurisdiction to bar a person from working with people with a disability, while the person’s application for an NDIS worker screening check is being processed.

More than incidental contact – contact with people with disabilities which involves:

  • Physical contact
  • Building a level of rapport with the person with disability as an integral or ordinary part of duties
  • Having contact with multiple people with disability, either as part of the direct delivery of a specialist disability support or service, or in a specialist disability accommodation sett

Whether contact is more than incidental is often linked to the level of opportunity a role would ordinarily provide to workers or other personnel to harm – including groom – a person with disability. The likelihood that contact is more than incidental increases with the intimacy, frequency, and regularity of the contact with a person with disability.

Risk Assessed Roles – A safeguard based on the opportunities a role provides to do harm. Under the NDIS Quality and Safeguards, service providers are responsible to assess every role in terms of its degree of contact with people with disabilities and therefore the opportunities the role affords (see Definitions: More than incidental contact). Some services and supports are automatically considered Risk Assessed Roles (see Definitions: Specified Supports/Services).

A Risk Assessed Role falls into one of three categories.

  • Any role which is a key personnel role. “Key personnel” includes those people who are responsible for executive decisions of a service provider.
  • Any role with duties which involve the direct delivery of particular kinds of services or supports to a person with disability (see Definitions – Specified Supports/Services).
  • Any role for which the normal duties are likely to require more than incidental contact with a person with disabilit

Note: while the NDIS Commission offers the above guidance, the service provider is responsible to assess the risk posed in any particular role. (See also Definitions: More than incidental contact, and Specified Supports/Services).

Specified Supports/Services – A further clarification of Risk Assessed Roles. All workers engaged in a role for which the normal duties include the direct delivery of specified supports or specified services to a person with disability must have a clearance. Workers providing the following services Specified supports are:

  • assistance to access and maintain employment or higher education
  • high intensity daily personal activities
  • assistance in coordinating or managing life stages, transitions and supports
  • assistance with daily personal activities
  • specialist positive behaviour support
  • community nursing care
  • assistance with daily life tasks in a group or shared living arrangement
  • innovative community participation
  • development of daily living and life skills
  • early intervention supports for early childhood
  • specialised hearing services
  • interpreting and translating
  • participation in community, social and civic activities
  • exercise physiology and personal training
  • management of funding for supports in participant plans
  • therapeutic supports
  • specialised driver training
  • specialised support coordination
  • specialised supported employment
  • hearing services
  • customised prosthetics
  • group and centre-based activities
  • assistance with travel/transport arrangements, (but only if the services are with respect to specialised transport to school/educational facility/employment/ community – i.e., not publicly available services such as taxi, bus and train services, even if specifically modified for use by people with disability).

Worker – any employee; self-employed person, contractor or subcontractor; volunteer; student (other than as a secondary or tertiary student undertaking formal work experience); minister, priest, rabbi, mufti or other like religious leader or spiritual officer of a religion or other member of a religious organisation.

 

 

4.0 POLICY

  • Holistic Home Care is committed to recruiting staff members who are suitably qualified and experienced and who have the competence and appropriate qualities to undertake their role within our organisation. Recruitment and selection procedures will be in accordance with employment legislation.

 

5.0 PROCEDURE

Recruitment and selection

  • Holistic Home Care staff will meet the minimum qualification and experience requirements set down by the NDIA for the delivery of supports to NDIS participants.
  • Holistic Home Care staff will meet the minimum experience requirements set down by the NDIA’s Guide to Suitability.
  • Minimum qualification and experience requirements will be included in recruitment documentation and Position Descriptions.
  • Holistic Home Care staff will meet the minimum qualification and experience requirements set down by the NDIA for the delivery of supports to NDIS participants.
  • Holistic Home Care staff will also meet the minimum experience requirements set down by the NDIA’s Guide to Suitability.
  • Minimum qualification and experience requirements will be included in recruitment documentation and Position Descriptions.
  • Holistic Home Care’s Director is responsible for recruiting staff and will:
  • develop selection criteria for each position;
  • advertise positions, respond to enquiries and email application forms if requested;
  • contact applicants and arrange interviews (including interview panels);
  • speak with nominated referees and seek opinion about the applicant’s qualities, skills and capacity to fulfil the role;
  • support selected applicants through the appointment process, including mandatory checks and contract negotiations; and
  • notify unsuccessful applicants in writing or verbally, offering feedback on application.
  • Selection will be based on merit and have respect to the Disputes and Grievances and Equity, Anti-Discrimination and Workplace Harassment Policies and Procedures.

Mandatory Checks

 

Note: From July 2019, NDIS providers in Queensland are required to comply with the NDIS Practice Standards for worker screening and risk management. Current clearances (blue cards) remain valid until the full transition to the NDIS in July 2020 unless expiring before that date and satisfy the requirements for worker clearances. Note, however, that the roles requiring clearances, and the responsibility for determining which roles require clearances, differs under the NDIS Practice Standards. New clearances should be obtained through the NDIS Worker Screening unit unless otherwise advised.

Note: penalties may apply where:

  • staff do not update their personal details attached to Working With Children Checks
  • organisations do not verify staff clearances
  • organisation do not assess the risk of all roles within their organisation
  • organisations do not keep proper records including:
  • records of how risks are assessed
  • records of staff clearances
  • records of subcontractor arrangements
  • organisations do not supply records when requested
  • organisations employ individuals whose online verification outcome is barred, interim barred or not found.

 

Preliminary Checks

  • The Director will confirm the identity (through photo identification) and qualifications (through sighting a copy) of all prospective staff prior to their appointment.
  • If qualifications are a mandatory requirement of the role, original qualifications must be copied, certified as being a true copy of the original and dated by the relevant delegate then returned to the applicant.

 

NDIS Worker Screening

  • Where Holistic Home Care provides services to NDIS-managed clients, it must:
    • conduct risk assessments for all positions not automatically prescribed by the NDIS Commission;
    • ensure that workers in roles identified in risk assessments hold valid and appropriate employment checks;
    • record and store risk assessments and the reasons for requiring checks for any nominated role.
  • Under the NDIS, service providers are responsible for determining which workers must be screened according to the following indicators:
    • All workers providing services in designated specified supports or specified services (see Definitions: Specified Supports/Services) must hold clearances.
    • Service providers must assess the risk to clients presented by ALL roles within the operation.
    • All workers in Risk Assessed Roles require clearances. A Risk Assessed Role falls into one of three categor
      • Any role which is a key personnel role. “Key personnel” includes those people who are responsible for executive decisions of a service provider.
      • Any role with duties which involve the direct delivery of particular kinds of services or supports to a person with disability (see Definitions – Specified Supports/Services).
      • Any role for which the normal duties are likely to require more than incidental contact with a person with disability, including access to clients’ personal and sensitive information.
    • As a NDIA Registered Provider, Holistic Home Care must screen new and existing staff, volunteers, students and contractors who work directly with people with disability before they are employed or appointed.
    • The Director is responsible for maintaining a staff record for all Holistic Home Care staff including their qualifications, training and criminal history and WWC check status. The Director must ensure these have been sighted and maintain the details on each staff record.
    • Employment contracts will stipulate that all staff are obligated to:
      • advise the Director if they are charged with a criminal offence which is punishable by imprisonment or, if found guilty, could reasonably affect their ability to meet the inherent requirements of their job; and
      • disclose any formal disciplinary action taken against them by any current or former employer. This includes any finding of improper or unprofessional conduct by any Court or Tribunal of any kind and any investigations that the staff member has been subject of by an employer, law enforcement agency or any integrity body or similar in Australia or in another country.
    • Where Holistic Home Care provides services to NDIS-managed clients, it must:
      • conduct risk assessments for all positions not automatically prescribed by the NDIS Commission;
      • ensure that workers in roles identified in risk assessments hold valid and appropriate employment checks;
      • record and store risk assessments and the reasons for requiring checks for any nominated role.
    • Holistic Home Care must ensure workers hold valid and appropriate screening checks where required.

 

Student placements

  • Students are exempt from Worker Screening requirements when performing a risk assessed role where they are:
    • a secondary school or tertiary student on a formal work experience placement with the registered NDIS provider; AND
    • directly supervised by another worker of the provider who has a clearance.

Contractors

  • Where contractors are employed as part of the ordinary activities of service delivery operations, Holistic Home Care will verify, as necessary:
    • criminal history screening status
    • insurances
    • qualifications
  • In engaging contractors to perform risk assessed roles, Holistic Home Care will:
    • identify each risk assessed role to the sub/contractor;
    • enter into an appropriate contract with the sub/contractor; and
    • take reasonable steps to ensure that the sub/contractor has an appropriate clearance.

An appropriate contract (above) includes the following obligations. The subcontractor must:

  • ensure that they, or their subcontractors, have an appropriate clearance; and
  • only allow a subcontractor to engage in a risk assessed role if the subcontractor may disclose, to Holistic Home Care, information about a risk assessed role, including but not limited to information about:
    • the making of an application for an NDIS worker screening check;
    • an interim bar;
    • a suspension;
    • an exclusion;
    • the closure of an application for a worker screening clearance;
    • the revocation of a clearance;
    • the expiry date of a clearance.
  • cooperate with any reasonable request from the registered NDIS provider for information relating to whether a member of other personnel has a clearance, or is subject to an exception in this Division; and
  • cooperate with any reasonable request from the registered NDIS provider for assistance to investigate any complaint made to the NDIS provider about the conduct of, or any reportable incident involving, any member of other personnel engaged in a risk assessed role; and
  • the subcontractor must cooperate with any reasonable request from the registered NDIS provider for information relating to whether and how it is complying with its obligations under the appropriate contract; and
  • the subcontractor must impose the obligations in (a), (b), (c), (d) and (e) on any other party with whom the subcontractor enters into an arrangement, which involves or allows for the provision of services by the other personnel to the NDIS provider.

 

Responsibilities

  • Holistic Home Care will:
    • screen new and existing staff, volunteers, students, self-employed people/contractors and board members (where applicable), who work directly with people with disability before they are employed or appointed, irrespective of how that their labour is sourced or deployed (see Definitions – Risk Assessed Roles).
    • confirm the identity (through photo identification) of all prospective staff prior to their appointment.
    • (where qualifications are a mandatory requirement of the role) store certified copies of original qualifications documents in the staff member’s file.
    • determine risk assessed roles by considering:
      • the degree of contact the role affords or requires (see Definitions – Contact and More than incidental contact)
      • whether the worker provides a Specified Service or Support (see Definitions – Specified Supports/Services)
      • whether the worker has access to confidential client information (see Definitions – Confidential Information/data).
    • ensure that all workers occupying risk assessed roles have appropriate clearances.
    • acquire clearances for workers appropriate to their roles.
    • maintain a record each staff member including their qualifications, training and criminal history and WWC check status (see below);
    • maintain a record of all risk assessed roles as required – including subcontracted positions (see below – Record Keeping)
    • require workers to disclose circumstances as they arise which may impact on their ability to retain criminal history clearances.
  • Holistic Home Care will not:
    • allow a person to work in a risk assessed role if:
      • they have been convicted of a “prescribed criminal offence”.
      • their clearances are subject to a bar or interim bar.
      • they cannot be located in the online verification process.
  • Staff will:
    • update personal details attached to their Working With Children Check within three months of changes in circumstances information;
    • advise the Director if they are charged with a criminal offence which is punishable by imprisonment or, if found guilty, could reasonably affect their ability to meet the inherent requirements of their job; and
    • disclose any formal disciplinary action taken against them by any current or former employer. This includes any finding of improper or unprofessional conduct by any Court or Tribunal of any kind and any investigations that the staff member has been subject of by an employer, law enforcement agency or any integrity body or similar in Australia or in another country.
    • inform Holistic Home Care within seven days if they have been issued with an Interim Negative Notice or Negative Notice, or if they have a relevant change in circumstances; and
    • not engage in child-related work if they have been issued with a Negative Notice.

Record Keeping: Role Risk Assessments

  • Holistic Home Care will maintain a written list of risk assessed roles in the organisation, including:
    • the title used for the role and a description of the role
    • the reasons why the role is a risk assessed role
    • the date the role was assessed and the name and title of the person who made the assessment
  • Holistic Home Care will maintain a written list of all workers who engage in risk assessed roles. The list needs to include:
    • the name, date of birth and address of the worker
    • the risk assessed role in which the worker engages
    • whether or not the worker is eligible for an exemption, the start and end date of the exemption and the name of the worker’s supervisor during this period
    • the worker’s application number or check number and outcome expiry date
    • records relating to an interim bar, suspension, exclusion or any action taken by the provider in relation to those decisions
    • allegations of misconduct against a worker with a clearance and the action taken by the provider in response to that allegation.
  • Holistic Home Care will:
    • update the records as required.
    • keep the records for seven years from the date the record was made.
    • keep the records in an organised, accessible and legible manner such that the NDIS Commission or quality auditor may know which workers were engaged in a risk assessed role on any given day in the past seven years.

 

Working with Children Check

  • Where staff have any contact with children in the course of their duties, all Holistic Home Care staff must have and maintain a clear Working with Children (WWC) check. This requirement applies to all volunteers and students unless:
    • they are working under the direct supervision of an educator who is over 18 years of age and holds, or is actively working towards, an approved Diploma-level education and care qualification;
    • parents, family members and guardians closely related to children attending the service.
  • The Director will ensure staff or volunteers issued with a Negative Notice do not undertake child-related work.
  • Staff and volunteers must:
    • inform Holistic Home Care within seven days if they have been issued with an Interim Negative Notice or Negative Notice, or if they have a relevant change in circumstances; and
    • not engage in child-related work if they have been issued with a Negative Notice.

 

 

Personal information

Collection and Storage of documentation and confidentiality

The Pre-Employment Collection Form will inform the potential staff member:

  • that information is being collected;
  • the purposes for collection;
  • who will have access to the information;
  • the right to seek access to, and/or correct, the information; and
  • the right to make complaint or appeal decisions about the handling of their information.

 

Personal information may include:

  • name,
  • date of birth,
  • gender,
  • current and previous addresses,
  • residency status,
  • telephone numbers and e-mail addresses,
  • bank account details,
  • tax file number,
  • driver’s licence number,
  • Centrelink information,
  • photographs,
  • race or ethnicity, and
  • medical history or information provided by a health service.

 

Personal information is collected to assist in:

  • assessing employment applications;
  • processing payment of salaries, salary sacrifice payments, and the payment of superannuation and taxation;
  • obtaining relevant security clearances;
  • providing a duty of care in your employment, particularly in relation to any disclosed medical conditions;
  • contacting family, carers, or other third parties as and if required; and
  • ensuring you hold a current drivers licence and private motor vehicle registration as required to perform your role within Holistic Home Care.

Further,

  • staff will be advised, during the induction process, where this policy is located on the Holistic Home Care intranet (or hard copy).
  • all personal staff information will be placed on their personal file, held in both electronic and hard copy formats. Both formats will be securely held, with access limited to staff members where needed in the performance of their roles or duties.

All staff shall notify Holistic Home Care of any changes to their personal information such as address, bank details, superannuation fund, or a private motor vehicle being used for work purposes.

At regular intervals Holistic Home Care will issue all staff, via email, a staff details form to complete and return to ensure personal information is up to date.

 

Accessing personal information

Staff can request and be granted access to their personal information, subject to exceptions allowed by law.

Requests to access personal information must state:

  • the information to be accessed
  • the preferred means of accessing the information,

and should be forwarded to the Director in writing to:

261/63 Old Cleveland Road, Stones Corner 4120 QLD

The Director will assess the request to access information, taking into consideration current issues that may exist with the staff member, and whether these issues relate to any lawful exceptions to granting access to personal information.

Should the Director decide that access to personal information will be denied, they must, within 30 days of receipt of the request, inform the staff member in writing of:

  • the reasons for denying access and
  • the mechanisms available to complain or appeal.

Should access be granted, the Director will contact the staff member within 30 days of receipt of the request to arrange access to their personal information.

Should Holistic Home Care be unable to provide the information in the means requested, the Director will discuss with the staff member alternative means of accessing their personal information.

 

Complaints

Questions or concerns about Holistic Home Care’s privacy practices should be brought, in the first instance, to the Director’s attention.

Staff may directly email the Director at asoni@holistichomecare.com.au

In investigating the complaint Holistic Home Care may, where necessary, contact the staff member making the complaint to obtain more information.

The staff member will be advised either in writing, or in a face to face meeting, of the outcomes and actions arising from the investigation.

If concerns cannot be resolved and the staff member wishes to formally complain about how their personal information is managed, or if they believe Holistic Home Care has breached an APP and/or IPP, they may send their concerns in writing to:

Office of the Information Commissioner Queensland

PO Box 10143

Adelaide Street Brisbane

Queensland 4000

Telephone: (07) 3234 7373

Email: enquiries@oic.qld.gov.au

Training and Development

  • Records of induction, training and organisational and professional development provided to all staff will be kept on each staff record as well as in Holistic Home Care’s Training and Development Register.

Induction

  • Upon commencement and prior to engaging with clients, Holistic Home Care will prepare new staff member and/or volunteer with timely and appropriate orientation to their role, the service and organisation. Where any specific training and/or support needs are identified during the recruitment and selection, Holistic Home Care will ensure these are met for the new staff member/volunteer.
  • Staff and volunteer induction will include (but is not limited to) the provision of information and training in:
    • Holistic Home Care’s Mission and Vision and Strategic and Operational Plans;
    • Holistic Home Care’s compliance responsibilities, including obligations under relevant legislation, regulations and standards and its Policies and Procedures;
    • staff roles and responsibilities and Holistic Home Care’s Staff Code of Conduct;
    • Holistic Home Care’s organisational and governance structures, team processes, communication channels, staffing, supervision arrangements and accountabilities;
    • continuous improvement, risk management and WHS, including, incident reporting and emergency procedures;
    • staff entitlements and working conditions;
    • client rights and responsibilities and Holistic Home Care’s Client Charter;
    • obtaining feedback and handling complaints;
    • privacy and confidentiality and Holistic Home Care’s records and information management processes;
    • supporting clients to actively participate in their service delivery, including family members and supporters in service delivery and alternative communication needs and aids;
    • cultural, linguistic and disability diversity;
    • the needs of vulnerable people including children, people with complex needs, and culturally and linguistically diverse and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people;
    • responsibilities under anti-discrimination legislation;
    • use of interpreters and translators;
    • the service’s access and exit/transition processes;
    • referral processes, including target response and referral timeframes and how to make appropriate referrals;
    • Holistic Home Care’s service network, Referral Database and appropriate referrals for common issues;
    • Holistic Home Care’s assessment, planning and review processes;
    • evidence-based, person-centred approaches to service delivery and how to use a strengths-based approach to identifying client needs and life goals;
    • Holistic Home Care’s financial management processes, including supporting clients’ control over their finances;
    • Holistic Home Care’s service delivery and participation processes;
    • Duty of Care requirements;
    • child protection and interacting appropriately with children;
    • how to respond to actual or potential signs of abuse and neglect, including their responsibilities for responding;
    • particular risks that may be experienced by people with different needs; and
    • positive behaviour support strategies.
  • Where possible, cultural awareness training will be delivered by local A&TSI and CALD groups to ensure it is tailored to the organisation’s service areas.
  • Ongoing training will be provided in these areas where required.
  • Feedback on the induction process will be sought to contribute to Holistic Home Care’s continuous improvement.

 

Ongoing Training and Development

  • Holistic Home Care is committed to ensuring staff and volunteers have the necessary skills and knowledge to competently undertake their duties.
  • Holistic Home Care will provide:
  • ongoing training and development opportunities for staff
  • opportunities for advancement within the organisation.
  • Regular staff Performance Reviews will:
  • identify training and development needs in consultation with their Manager
  • encourage staff engagement in their ongoing development.
  • The Director will be responsible for overseeing training and development needs for Holistic Home Care. They will:
  • track training undertaken and future needs in Holistic Home Care’s Staff Training and Development Register; and
  • plan and publicise, to all staff, upcoming training and development opportunities using a Training and Development Calendar distributed .
  • Where Holistic Home Care’s capacity and resources allow, staff will be supported to pursue further education or training that will contribute to their professional development but which may not be a requirement directly relevant to their current position.
  • Holistic Home Care will provide equity of access to professional development opportunities for all staff, taking into account the organisation’s needs and the needs and skills of staff.
  • At the Director’s discretion, and taking into account any impact on service delivery or other staff, the staff member may be:
  • permitted to take annual leave or unpaid leave that would assist them to participate in the activity; and
  • granted up to two days’ study leave as necessary to attend examinations.

 

Staff management and retention

  • Staff performance and retention are supported by the following organisational policies and procedures:
  • Human Resources;
  • Financial Management;
  • Continuous Improvement;
  • Staff Code of Conduct;
  • Staff Complaints;
  • Equity, Anti-Discrimination and Workplace Harassment; and
  • Workplace Health and Safety.
  • Staff are expected to attend regular team meetings, where they will have access to information sharing, training and development, and debrief opportunities.
  • All staff will receive supervision (debrief and mentoring) sessions monthly with their immediate supervisor.

 

Performance Reviews and Management

  • Performance Reviews will be conducted for all staff on a regular basis. These will assess staff capability to perform their role and their understanding and application of Holistic Home Care’s policies and procedures and provide an opportunity to set future professional goals.
  • Performance Reviews will seek to:
  • clarify any issues relevant to the staff member’s job description and performance standards;
  • identify the staff member’s strengths;
  • identify areas where the staff member needs to improve;
  • identify and confirm the actions to be taken to maintain, enhance or improve performance; and
  • set future professional goals.
  • The supervisor will complete a Staff Performance Review. This will be signed by them and the staff member.
  • Where strategies for performance improvement are required, a Staff Performance Improvement Plan must be completed and signed by the staff member and Senior Manager.
  • A copy of the completed Performance Appraisals will be placed on the staff member’s file and a copy given to the staff member.
  • If a staff member believes that they have been directly or indirectly discriminated against in the performance review, they should take action in accordance with Holistic Home Care’s Disputes and Grievances Policy and Procedure.

 

Termination of Employment

  • Should staff choose to end their employment with the organisation, they are required to give Holistic Home Care:
    • written notice;
    • in advance, as stated in the relevant industrial Award or instrument.
  • Holistic Home Care has the discretion to pay the staff member their notice period in lieu of having them attend work for the notice period.
  • All salary and entitlements are paid to the staff member within 14 days of the end of their employment with the organisation.

 

Disciplinary Action

  • Staff may face disciplinary action if they:
    • they are not performing satisfactorily;
    • preventing other staff members from carrying out their duties; or
    • are not complying with Holistic Home Care’s Code of Conduct, Policies and Procedures or their Employment Contract.
  • Holistic Home Care’s management staff are responsible for identifying problems as soon as they arise and taking action. They must maintain records of all performance-related discussions and counselling sessions and keep these on staff records.
  • If managers identify unsatisfactory performance of a staff member, they must advise the staff member.
  • An opportunity must be provided for the staff member to improve their performance within a reasonable timeframe. Training may be required to improve the standard of the staff member’s performance.
  • If the staff member’s performance does not improve to the required standard after assistance and training has been provided within the specified time, the Director must document specific performance problems.
  • If misconduct occurs, the Director must document the issues with the staff member, detailing relevant incidents and behaviours.
  • The Director will meet with the staff member and inform them that a report will be written and they will be provided with a copy.
  • The following disciplinary process will then be followed:
  • Discussion/Counselling – between the Director and the staff member. The problem will be explained and the staff member asked to respond. The staff member is entitled to have a support person present. If misconduct or non-performance is proved, the Director will advise the staff member of the corrective action they need to take. The Director will record details of the disciplinary session. All parties present must sign the report. Where this report is presented by email, the staff member may acknowledge the report as true by return email.
  • First warning – if the incident of misconduct is repeated or performance does not improve, the Director will issue a first written warning. If the case is considered severe enough, the first warning can be regarded as the first and final warning.
  • Final warning – if the problem persists, the Director will issue a final written warning to the staff member. If the issue is not resolved, the Director will take action to dismiss the staff member.
  • The Director will maintain formal records of each counselling/disciplinary session and keep them confidential. All records must be sighted and signed by the relevant staff member as true. Such records will provide important evidence if the matter proceeds to the Fair Work Commission.
  • In all processes the principles of natural justice must be followed. This means the staff member must have an opportunity to state their point of view before action is taken and that the decision maker must not be biased.

 

Dismissal

  • Staff members may be dismissed on the basis of:
  • their conduct, capacity or performance;
  • operational requirements, e.g. the position is no longer required; or
  • other reasons sufficient to justify termination.
  • If a staff member engages in serious misconduct so that it is unreasonable for Holistic Home Care to continue their employment, they may be dismissed instantly. Such action must be supported by a high level of evidence. Examples of serious misconduct include theft, assault and fraud.
  • Holistic Home Care must comply with all State and Federal legislation and the staff member’s Employment Contract in relation to disciplinary action and employment termination.
  • Holistic Home Care must ensure:
  • dismissal is not for an unfair reason;
  • the staff member knows the reason for dismissal and has an opportunity to respond in relation to that reason; and
  • it gives the staff member appropriate notice or compensation in lieu of notice.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

STAFF CODE OF CONDUCT

 

Policy Code HRP002.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure provides ethical guidelines for staff, volunteers and students engaged in Holistic Home Care business.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, and any additional staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

2.0 RISK

Two main forms of risks are associated with staff conduct: risks associated with staff as representatives of the organisation and the particular risks associated with working with people with disabilities.

As representatives of the organisation, staff conduct can influence public perception, the standing of the organisation within the community and the success of the organisation. Risk treatment begins with clear guidelines for staff conduct (this policy). This must be reinforced with: a culture of procedural fairness in informal and formal discussions about conduct; a culture of no retribution for responsibly reporting suspected infringements of the code of conduct (Preventing and Responding to Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation Policy and Procedure); and a culture that promotes a sense of mutual responsibility between the organisation and its staff.

As workers in the disability sector, staff must be able to distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate care between themselves and clients, and be able to express the client/worker relationship appropriately. The guidance this policy provides should be reinforced with a culture of openness and support to assist workers discuss and manage relationships with clients.

 

2.0 POLICY

Holistic Home Care prides itself on its professionalism and on its staff’s ability to meet client and other stakeholder needs. The organisation strives to be a leading service provider and to provide a safe, healthy and happy workplace. This Code of Conduct is designed to ensure that all staff, clients and other stakeholders are treated in a manner that reflects the Mission, culture and legal obligations of the service.

 

  • PROCEDURE

NDIS Code of Conduct

Holistic Home Care adheres to the NDIS Codes of Conduct for providers and workers.

Staff, students and volunteers are required to observe the NDIS Code of Conduct

The NDIS Code of Conduct requires workers and providers delivering NDIS supports to:

  • act with respect for individual rights to freedom of expression, self-determination, and decision-making in accordance with relevant laws and conventions
  • respect the privacy of people with disability
  • provide supports and services in a safe and competent manner with care and skill
  • act with integrity, honesty, and transparency
  • promptly take steps to raise and act on concerns about matters that might have an impact on the quality and safety of supports provided to people with disability
  • take all reasonable steps to prevent and respond to all forms of violence, exploitation, neglect, and abuse of people with disability
  • take all reasonable steps to prevent and respond to sexual m

 

In determining whether a person’s conduct is in breach of this Code, a range of factors, including the nature of the conduct and the circumstances in which the conduct takes place, will be considered.

Supervising staff are encouraged to ensure that all staff, volunteers and students under their supervision achieve the highest possible standards of conduct.

Guiding principles for the Code of Conduct:

  • RESPECT – for people and the law
  • INTEGRITY – all actions are honest and ethical
  • ACCOUNTABILITY – decisions and actions in all areas of service delivery are transparent, fair and legal
  • DILIGENCE – staff, volunteers and students carry out their duties honestly and to the best of their ability

Respect

Holistic Home Care staff, volunteers and students will carry out their duties with respect for clients, staff, the organisation and its work. Individuals will refrain from public comments that portray the organisation and/or its work in a negative way.

Respect for the law: Holistic Home Care staff, volunteers and students will observe all the laws of the State and the Commonwealth.

Staff and volunteers must immediately inform the Director if charged with a criminal offence punishable by imprisonment, or if found guilty of the offence and the outcome would significantly affect their ability to perform their normal duties.

Respect for persons: Holistic Home Care will strive to create an environment where all persons are treated equitably and with respect and where people’s rights are upheld. This involves individual and collective responsibilities to:

  • respect the rights, privacy and confidentiality of clients, staff, office bearers, volunteers, students and agents;
  • promote a positive public image of people with a disability, and their families and carers;
  • make decisions which are procedurally fair;
  • have respect for the opinions of others and approach any differences in opinion in an open and non-judgmental manner;

Staff, volunteers and students should recognise that their obligation to respect the rights and privacy of all persons associated with Holistic Home Care continues after they cease employment with Holistic Home Care.

Respect for persons emphasises the obligation of office bearers, staff, volunteers and students to refrain from behaviour which is or may be construed as sexual-, racial- or gender-based harassment.  They should never behave towards other persons in a manner which may reasonably be perceived as intimidating, overbearing or bullying. All staff, volunteers and students must ensure that co-worker relationships are dignified and respectful at all times. (See also Equity, Anti-Discrimination and Workplace Harassment Policy and Procedure)

 

Integrity

Staff, volunteers and students are placed in a position of trust when they manage or have access to Holistic Home Care resources and information or make decisions that affect the interests of others.

Staff, volunteers and students will not undertake activities for personal gain while conducting business of the organisation.

People who have exited the organisation should not disclose to any future employer or use for their own purposes any confidential information, records, documents or materials they may have had access to during their involvement with Holistic Home Care.

Staff, volunteers and students should make all reasonable efforts to avoid conflicts between their private and/or professional interests and Holistic Home Care responsibilities and must always avoid situations where there are reasonable grounds for the perception of such a conflict.

Personal relationships: A conflict of interest may occur when a staff member or volunteer participates in decisions affecting another person with whom they have a close or personal relationship. Situations where such a conflict may occur include, but are not limited to:

  • the appointment, supervision or promotion of staff,
  • decisions being made that are of a nature to directly benefit the other person the awarding of tenders, or
  • other forms of financial assistance.

Holistic Home Care recognises the right of staff and volunteers to engage in personal or intimate relationships with people of their own choosing. However, relationships between office bearers, staff and volunteers should be professional at all times.  Personal or intimate relationships should not intrude, or be seen to intrude, on the Holistic Home Care environment or the workplace in general.

When a personal or intimate relationship creates a clear conflict, the staff member should withdraw from the situation. Where there is any possibility of a perceived conflict, the staff member should discuss the matter with a senior staff member or the Director.

Personal or intimate relationships between staff/volunteers and clients are not permitted and any deviation from this may be considered a serious breach of conduct and addressed in accordance with the Human Resources Policy.

Staff and volunteers should also refrain from unnecessary self-disclosure of personal information during their contacts with clients.

External environments: Staff or volunteers representing Holistic Home Care in public must conduct themselves with propriety and be accountable for their conduct and decisions made on behalf of Holistic Home Care.  Where a staff member or volunteer is unsure of the capacity in which they are acting, they should seek clarification from a senior staff member.

Alcohol and illicit drug consumption: During the usual day-to-day conduct of their duties, staff and volunteers must never consume alcohol or illicit substances and must be free from the influence of any substance prior to commencement of a shift. Any deviation from this practice will be viewed as a serious breach of conduct and will be addressed in accordance with the Human Resources Policy and Procedure.

Whilst alcohol consumption may be permissible, or may be available, at certain business functions, staff and volunteers should refrain from excessive consumption of alcohol whilst representing Holistic Home Care. Staff and volunteers are encouraged to use commonsense to maintain Holistic Home Care’s interests and professional image, as well as their own welfare.

Dress standards: Dress standards are more a matter of etiquette rather than ethics. However, staff, volunteers and students must present a professional image and maintain an appropriate standard of appearance whilst engaged in Holistic Home Care business.

Senior staff have a responsibility to counsel staff members, volunteers and students whose dress standards do not comply with the above.

Gifts and benefits: Staff, volunteers and students must never ask for gifts, or encourage gift giving of any kind in connection with the performance of official or work duties. Personal gifts from clients must be declared and recorded in the Gift Register. Any gifts that are above a nominal value must not be accepted.

Intellectual property and copyright: The Copyright Act provides creators with certain rights. This includes the right to be named in connection with their work and against false authorship. When using someone else’s work in a presentation or document, authorship should be appropriately acknowledged. Ownership of all materials produced during the course of working for Holistic Home Care is vested in the organisation.

 

Compliance with laws and Holistic Home Care’s governance

  • Staff and volunteers and visitors must comply with all lawful and reasonable directions given by Holistic Home Care.
  • Staff and volunteers and, where applicable, visitors must comply with Holistic Home Care’s policies and procedures at all times.
  • Staff and volunteers and visitors must comply with all relevant legislation, regulations, codes, standards, guidelines and policies that are applicable to Holistic Home Care’s operations irrespective of location.

 

Company property  

  • Holistic Home Care property includes:
    • equipment, vehicles and premises;
    • intellectual property (including trade and business secrets) of Holistic Home Care or affiliated entity;
    • information concerning staff, volunteers and any contractors that provide a service to Holistic Home Care; and
    • any information of a commercial, operational, marketing, business, technical or financial nature relating to the business of Holistic Home Care or any affiliated entity.
  • Staff and volunteers must only use company property for authorised and appropriate work purposes and must take all reasonable care when doing so.
  • On termination of employment, for whatever reason, staff and volunteers must transfer to the Director all information in their possession, including all material in writing, software or databases on hard drive or any other means of storage.
  • If requested by the Director, office bearers, staff or volunteers must immediately return all Holistic Home Care property in their possession or under their control.

Outside work behaviour

  • Staff and volunteers must conduct their personal affairs in a manner that does not affect their duties and responsibilities to Holistic Home Care.
  • Staff and volunteers should be aware that their activities or behaviour outside working hours could damage Holistic Home Care’s reputation. Staff and volunteers must avoid conduct outside of work that breaches this Code. If Holistic Home Care becomes aware of such conduct, and the conduct is of a type that could have an adverse impact upon Holistic Home Care, disciplinary or other remedial action may be taken against the worker.

Accountability

All staff and volunteers have an obligation to carry out official decisions and policies faithfully and impartially.

Senior staff members have a responsibility to ensure that sufficient, accurate and appropriate information is provided to enable office bearers to make decisions that are procedurally fair, transparent and timely.

Staff and volunteers who have responsibility for the day-to-day management and delivery of Holistic Home Care services will provide accurate and regular reports.

Fraud, corrupt conduct and maladministration are detrimental to Holistic Home Care and clients. Any staff member or volunteer who reasonably suspects that this may be occurring are encouraged to speak with the Director as soon as possible. Where disclosure of any of these activities occurs, the person disclosing the information will not be subjected to any acts of retribution.

Unfounded reports that are of a malicious or vengeful nature will not be pursued. Appropriate action will be taken against any person who is found to have made malicious or unsubstantiated claims.

Diligence

Holistic Home Care aims to achieve best practice in service delivery. All staff and volunteers contribute to achieving this aim by carrying out their duties honestly and to the best of their ability.

All staff and volunteers should support the Holistic Home Care’s aims and objectives, and work within policy and procedural guidelines.

Holistic Home Care’s equipment and resources are not available for private use or private gain and appropriate care and security of equipment should be a priority.

Holistic Home Care’s resources, equipment and property should be used with economy and without undue waste. All equipment will be used with due care and respect and if necessary staff and volunteers should seek guidance in the use and appropriate storage of equipment.

All staff, volunteers and students have access to appropriate technology related to their role in the organisation.

Staff, volunteers and students who are authorised to use computers are permitted to use Internet and email for purposes directly related to their duties and for educational or self-development purposes consistent with other Holistic Home Care policies and practices.

Inappropriate use of internet and email, including viewing, downloading, storage or forwarding of materials of a pornographic or illegal nature will be considered as a serious breach of this Code of Conduct and disciplinary action up to and termination of employment will be pursued as a matter of urgency.

Reporting breaches of the code of conduct

Breaches or suspected breaches of the Code of Conduct, should, in the first instance, be reported to the Director. Trivial, unfounded or vexatious complaints may result in disciplinary action.

Any person who complies with the Code of Conduct in reporting a breach must not be discriminated against and must be protected from reprisal. Confidentiality will be maintained at the highest level possible.

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

 

LEAVE POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code HRP003.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure sets out the accrual and accessing of leave provisions.

This policy and procedure applies to all staff.

 

2.0 DEFINITIONS

Immediate familya staff member’s:

  • spouse
  • de facto partner
  • child
  • parent
  • grandparent
  • grandchild
  • sibling, or a
  • child, parent, grandparent, grandchild or sibling of the staff member’s spouse or de facto partner

 

3.0 POLICY

Holistic Home Care complies with the leave provisions for staff employed under the Social, Community, Home Care and Disability Services Industry Award 2010 (SCHADS Award) (Cwlth) and the National Employment Standards (NES).

4.0 PROCEDURE

  • Full-time and part-time staff are entitled to annual leave as set out in the National Employment Standards. Casual staff are not entitled to annual or personal leave.
  • In summary, the National Employment Standards provide 4 weeks of paid annual leave for full-time staff members for each year of service with the company. Part time staff members receive a pro rata entitlement.

Paid leave

All requests for paid leave must be made on a Leave Application Form.

Annual Leave:

All full-time staff members accrue 152 hours per annum based on ordinary hours worked and pro-rata for part time staff members, based on ordinary hours worked per annum.  

Staff members who work more than four (4) ordinary hours on ten (10) or more weekends are entitled to an additional week’s annual leave on the same terms and conditions. Additional leave must be approved by a senior staff member.

Personal / Carer’s Leave:

Full time staff members are entitled to 76 hours of paid personal/carer’s leave each year and pro-rata for part-time staff members based on ordinary hours worked each year. Paid personal/carer’s leave accrues progressively on a staff member’s ordinary hours of work and accumulates from year to year.

Personal/carer’s leave can be taken when the staff member is unfit for work due to personal ill health or injury or to provide support to a member of their immediate family or household who requires support due to ill health or injury or an unexpected emergency affecting the staff member.

All staff members, including casual staff members are entitled to two (2) days unpaid carer’s leave when a member of their immediate family or household requires care and support due to illness, injury or an unexpected emergency.

Full-time and part-time staff members are only eligible for two (2) days unpaid carer’s leave if they do not have any paid personal / carer’s leave left.

 

Compassionate Leave:

All staff members, including casuals are entitled to two (2) days compassionate leave when a member of their immediate family or household has sustained a life threatening injury or illness. Compassionate leave may also be taken after the death of a member of the staff member’s immediate family or household.

Casual staff members are only eligible for unpaid compassionate leave.

Notice and Evidence Requirements:

For annual leave, staff members are required to provide at least two (2) weeks’ notice prior to taking the annual leave.

Staff members taking personal/carer’s leave or compassionate leave must, when requested, provide evidence that would satisfy a reasonable person that the leave was taken as per the above guidelines. For example, a certificate from a doctor for absences due to illness or injury that require two (2) or more consecutive days absence from the workplace or in other circumstances, a Statutory Declaration.

 

Unpaid leave

Unpaid leave can be applied for in extenuating circumstances when all other leave entitlements are used up, and where requests fall outside of those prescribed in the SCHADS Award and the NES.

Requests for unpaid leave of absence must be made in writing, stating the period of leave requested, reasons for the leave and should include any documentation that supports the request. Requests for unpaid leave of absence in excess of six (6) weeks generally will not be considered. However, applications will be considered on a case by case basis by the Director.

Assessment of each application will take into consideration organisational implications for the specific program within which the staff member works, any short and/or long term effects the absence may have for clients and the extent to which Holistic Home Care may have to engage the services of a replacement staff member or absorb the staff member’s agreed working hours within the existing quota of staff.

Where unpaid leave of absence is granted, and a replacement staff member is engaged, the replacement staff member will be informed in writing of the temporary nature of their employment.

If, during a period of approved absence, the staff member’s circumstances change, to the extent that their employment with Holistic Home Care, written notification to the employer must be provided as soon as practicable. The staff member must also notify the employer if their contact details and/or address change during their period of leave.

Any request for variation in approved unpaid leave conditions must be made in writing to the Director.

If a staff member wishes to change the return to work date, the request must be submitted in writing. Where an earlier return to work date is requested, consideration will be given to the arrangements already in place with the replacement staff member or stand in staff. Where Holistic Home Care has entered into an employment agreement with another staff member for the duration of the leave of absence, the terms of the contract/agreement will take precedence over the request for change.

A staff member on unpaid leave of absence must contact the Director two (2) weeks prior to their return to work date and confirm their intention to return.  Where the staff member does not contact the employer and does not return to work on the agreed date, it may be assumed that they have abandoned their employment with Holistic Home Care and a letter to this effect will be forwarded to the staff member.

When the leave of absence has been for a period of six (6) weeks or more Holistic Home Care may require the staff member to undertake orientation and/or training to meet any changed requirements associated with the position.

Domestic and Family Violence Leave

Domestic and Family Violence Leave entitlements apply to all staff covered by an industry or occupation award.

Staff covered by an award are entitled to 5 days of unpaid family and domestic violence leave each year, immediately they start work.

Family and domestic violence means violent, threatening or other abusive behaviour by a staff member’s family member that:

  • seeks to coerce or control the staff member
  • causes them harm or fear.

Staff can take the leave if they need to deal with the impact of family and domestic violence and it’s impractical to do so outside their ordinary hours of work. For example, this could include:

  • making arrangements for their safety, or safety of a family member (including relocation)
  • attending court hearings, or
  • accessing police services.

Accessing Domestic and Family Violence Leave

Leave may be accessed as single days, multiple days or the full 5 days.

Where Holistic Home Care agrees, leave may be taken for less than 1 day at a time, or for more than 5 days.

Leave taken does not break the staff member’s period of continuous service

Leave taken does not count as service against accumulated entitlements such as paid leave.

Notice and evidence

Staff members applying for family and domestic violence leave, must notify the Director of:

  • when leave will be required or as soon as possible after the leave has started;
  • the duration of leave required.

Holistic Home Care may request reasonable evidence demonstrating that leave is or was required to deal with family and domestic violence. Evidence might include:

  • documents issued by the police service
  • documents issued by a court
  • family violence support service documents, or
  • a statutory declaration.

Holistic Home Care may ask employees to provide evidence for as little as 1 day or less off work.

Holistic Home Care may decline a family and domestic violence leave application where requested evidence is not provided.

Confidentiality

Information about a staff member’s experience of family and domestic violence is sensitive.

Holistic Home Care will work with the staff member to determine how this information will be handled.

Holistic Home Care will take all practicable steps to keep information about a staff member’s situation confidential, including information about giving notice, the leave and evidence provided.

Holistic Home Care may disclose information if:

  • it’s required by law, or
  • is necessary to protect the life, health or safety of the employee or another person.

Parental leave

Staff are entitled to unpaid parental leave (which includes maternity, paternity, adoption and parental leave) as set out in the National Employment Standards.

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changed to include Domestic and Family Violence Leave Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

RETURN TO WORK POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code HRP004.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure provides guidance where a staff member has been injured during the course of employment.

This policy and procedure applies to staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

 

2.0 POLICY

Holistic Home Care strives to prevent injury and illness by providing a safe and healthy working environment. It is committed to the return to work of its injured workers and will:

  • support the injured worker and ensure that early return to work is a normal expectation; participate in the development of an injury management plan and ensure that injury management commences as soon as possible after the work is injured;
  • provide suitable duties for an injured worker as soon as possible;
  • ensure that injured workers (and anyone representing them) are aware of their rights and responsibilities – including the right to choose their own doctor and approved workplace rehabilitation provider, and the responsibility to provide accurate information about the injury and its cause;
  • consult with staff and, where applicable, unions to ensure that the return to work program operates as smoothly as possible;
  • maintain the confidentiality of injured worker records;
  • not dismiss a worker as a result of a work related injury within six months of becoming unfit for employment;

3.0 PROCEDURE

Return to work

  • The Director will arrange a suitable person to explain the return to work process to the injured worker.
  • The Director will ensure that the injured worker is offered the assistance of a WorkCover-approved workplace rehabilitation provider if it becomes evident that they are not likely to resume their pre-injury duties, or cannot do so without changes to the workplace or work practices.
  • The Director will arrange for the worker’s early return to work (subject to medical and rehabilitation provider advice).

Suitable duties

  • The Director will develop an individual return to work plan when the worker according to medical advice, is capable of returning to work.
  • The Director will provide suitable duties that are consistent with medical advice and that are meaningful, productive and appropriate for the injured worker’s physical and psychological condition depending on the individual circumstances of the injured worker. Suitable duties may be:
    • at the same worksite or a different worksite
    • the same job with different hours or modified duties
    • a different job
    • full time or part time

Dispute resolution

  • Holistic Home Care will work together with the injured worker and their union representative to resolve any disagreements about the return to work program or suitable duties.
  • If disagreements cannot be resolved, Holistic Home Care will involve other parties such as the worker’s treating doctor, the agent/insurer, an approved workplace rehabilitation provider or an injury management consultant.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

EQUITY, ANTI-DISCRIMINATION AND WORKPLACE HARASSMENT POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code HRP005.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure demonstrates Holistic Home Care’s commitment to equal opportunity and a workplace free from discrimination and harassment.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, and any additional staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

 

2.0 DEFINITIONS

Equity – treating all persons fairly and without discrimination.

Discrimination treating a person less favourably than others in similar circumstances because of a personal attribute that has no relevance to the situation.

Discrimination is unlawful under both federal and state anti-discrimination legislation. Discrimination is unlawful on the grounds of age, sex, marital status, pregnancy, religion, race, colour, nationality, sexual preference, physical or intellectual impairment, family responsibilities, political preference, criminal record and medical records.

Age discriminationDiscrimination on the basis of age (regardless of age) or on the basis of age-specific characteristics or characteristics generally associated with a person of a particular age.

Disability discrimination – Discrimination on the basis of physical, intellectual, psychiatric, sensory, neurological or learning disability, physical disfigurement, disorder, illness or disease that affects thought processes, perception of reality, emotions or judgement, or results in disturbed behaviour, and presence in body of organisms causing or capable of causing disease or illness (e.g., HIV virus).

Racial discrimination – Discrimination on the basis of race, colour, descent or national or ethnic origin and in some circumstances, immigrant status.

Sex discrimination Discrimination on the basis of sex, marital or relationship status, pregnancy or potential pregnancy, breastfeeding, family responsibilities, sexual orientation, gender identity or intersex status.

Sexual harassment – any form of unwanted, unwelcome or uninvited sexual behaviour that is offensive, humiliating or embarrassing.

Workplace bullying – Workplace bullying is repeated less favourable treatment of a person, which may be considered unreasonable and inappropriate. Bullying can either be perpetrated by an individual or a group and can be psychological, verbal or social. Often bullying can also create a risk to the physical and or mental health and safety of workers. Workplace bullying is defined as repeated and unreasonable behaviour directed towards a worker or a group of workers that creates a risk to health and safety and intimidates, humiliates and/or undermines a person or group.

Workplace harassment – repeated behaviour, other than behaviour amounting to sexual harassment, of one staff member or group of staff members that is unwelcome, unsolicited and considered to be offensive, intimidating, humiliating or threatening by another staff member.

 

3.0 POLICY

  • Holistic Home Care is committed to providing a workplace that is free from harassment, discrimination and bullying. This responsibility is at the heart of the values of the organisation; it reflects how people should treat each other through building relationships based on trust, respect and safety.
  • Holistic Home Care considers all types of harassment, discrimination, bullying and workplace violence to be unacceptable forms of behaviours that will not be tolerated under any circumstances. Holistic Home Care believes all staff and clients should be treated with respect, fairly and in a reasonable way. Harassment, discrimination, bullying and workplace violence are illegal under a range of Federal and State legislation.
  • If any staff breaches this policy it will result in disciplinary action which may include termination of employment. It is the responsibility of all staff to act in such a way as to create a working environment which is free of any form of discrimination or harassment.

Holistic Home Care’s commitment to equity accords with the Sex Discrimination Act 1984 (Cwlth), Racial Discrimination Act 1975 (Cwlth), Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cwlth), Age Discrimination Act 2004 (Cwlth), and the Australian Human Rights Commission Act 1986 (Cwlth).

4.0 PROCEDURE

Expected Workplace Behaviours

Under work health and safety laws, staff and other people at our workplaces must take reasonable care that they do not adversely affect the health and safety of others. Discrimination and harassment put health and safety at risk.

Holistic Home Care expects staff to:

  • Behave in a responsible and professional manner;
  • Treat others in the workplace with courtesy and respect;
  • Listen and respond appropriately to the views and concerns of others;
  • Be fair and honest in their dealings with others; and
  • Provide all staff, and potential staff, equal access to employment, training

and career opportunities including employment related benefits

This policy applies to behaviours that occur:

  • In connection with work, even if it occurs outside normal working hours;
  • During work activities;
  • At work related events; and
  • On social media where workers interact with colleagues or clients and their actions may affect colleagues or clients either directly or indirectly.

 

Responding to Harassment, Discrimination and Bullying

Holistic Home Care will not tolerate discrimination, sexual harassment or bullying in our workplace. Breaches of this policy may lead to termination of employment with Holistic Home Care.

Any form of discrimination or workplace harassment or bullying must be reported either by those either subject to the behaviour, or by a witness. A person can raise a complaint either verbally or in writing by:

  1. Informing their supervisor, or the Director;
  2. Using Holistic Home Care’s established reporting procedures such as incident reports or the staff grievance process.
  • All breaches of this policy and procedure will be taken seriously.
  • Staff members who feel they are the subject of discrimination or harassment should:
  • approach the Director to discuss appropriate actions or options; or
  • lodge a formal complaint or grievance which will be dealt with by the Director in accordance with Holistic Home Care’s Disputes and Grievances Policy and Procedure.
  • Complaints will be dealt with promptly and in accordance with relevant State and Federal legislation and Holistic Home Care policies and procedures.
  • All complaints will remain confidential.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

 

STAFF COMPLAINTS POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code HRP006.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure guides the processes around staff complaints.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, and any additional staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

 

2.0 POLICY

  • Staff have the right to raise a complaint within the management structure of the organisation where they feel their treatment is unjust or unfair.
  • Holistic Home Care seeks an organisational culture that is non-threatening, in which complaints can be expressed and addressed without fear of retribution. No person with a complaint shall be subject to reprisal as a result of their registering a complaint.
  • Staff are entitled to their privacy; complaints must be treated confidentially by all members of staff involved.
  • The organisational culture, however, also encourages staff to use informal means of conflict resolution and to resolve complaints, where possible, at the point of conflict with the person(s) concerned or as close as possible to the level where the conflict has occurred. Holistic Home Care takes formal complaints seriously and it is equally important that the staff member takes responsibility for initiating a complaint.
  • Staff members have a right to appeal the decision made on their complaint if they are not content with the outcome and have the right to have their chosen representative present at any time in a complaint or dispute process.

3.0 PROCEDURE

Formally lodging grievances

  • If a dispute cannot be resolved, the staff member should lodge a grievance in writing to the Director.
  • This should detail:
  • description of the decision/s or behaviour/s that are the subject of the dispute;
  • the manner in which the decision or behaviour has adversely affected the staff member;
  • the time and date of the decision/s or behaviour/s;
  • names of witnesses;
  • attempts made to resolve the dispute; and
  • the action the staff member deems necessary to resolve the grievance.

 

Investigating grievances

  • Once a formal grievance is lodged, the Director (or delegate) will investigate the matter within five working days.
  • If the Director has a conflict of interest in the matter, an independent party will conduct the investigation.
  • The following parties will be interviewed:
  • the staff member who lodged the grievance;
  • the staff member against whom the grievance has been lodged;
  • any witnesses; and
  • the relevant supervisor(s).

 

Resolving grievances

  • Where necessary, the Director will:
  • appoint an independent mediator to help resolve disputes; and
  • encourage the participation of a support person, union or professional association representation and involvement in dispute resolution procedures.
  • If the investigation reveals that the grievance is valid, and depending on the nature of the complaint and its seriousness, the staff member against whom the grievance was lodged may be:
  • required to apologise to the staff member who lodged the grievance;
  • given a written warning, counselling, transfer or demotion; or
  • subject to dismissal processes.
  • If the grievance cannot be substantiated because of a lack of evidence, the organisation may:
  • remind all staff members of their obligations under the Code of Conduct and the Equity, Anti-Discrimination and Workplace Harassment Policy and Procedure;
  • ask all staff members to undertake training in negotiation skills and dispute resolution;
  • ask supervisors to identify potential conflicts among their staff members and offer counselling.
  • If the grievance is found to be a frivolous claim, and depending on the seriousness of the allegations, the staff member making the complaint may be:
  • asked to undertake counselling;
  • make a written apology to the staff member complained about;
  • given a written warning, transfer or demotion; or
  • subject to dismissal processes.
  • Staff have the right to appeal decisions relating to disputes. Appeals should be directed in writing to the Director who will make a final decision. Staff who are not successful in their appeal will have the original decision reconfirmed.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

CHILD SAFE CODE OF CONDUCT

Policy Code

 

HRP 007.01
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 21 August 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This Code of Conduct outlines the expected standards of behaviour with and in the company of children, including online conduct.

This policy and procedure applies to all additional staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

2.0 CODE OF CONDUCT

All personnel are required to observe child safe principles and expectations for appropriate behaviour towards and in the company of children, as described below.

All personnel are responsible for supporting the safety, participation, wellbeing and empowerment of children by:

  • adhering to the Child Safe Policy at all times
  • taking all reasonable steps to protect children from abuse
  • treating everyone with respect
  • listening and responding to the views and concerns of children, particularly if they are telling you that they or another child has been abused and/or are worried about their safety or the safety of another
  • promoting the cultural safety, participation and empowerment of Aboriginal children (for example, by never questioning an Aboriginal child’s self-identification)
  • promoting the cultural safety, participation and empowerment of children with culturally and/or linguistically diverse backgrounds (for example, by having a zero tolerance of discrimination)
  • promoting the safety, participation and empowerment of children with a disability (for example, during personal care activities)
  • ensuring as far as practicable that adults are not left alone with a child
  • reporting any allegations of child abuse to the Director and ensure any allegation to reported to the police or child protection
  • reporting any child safety concerns to the Director
  • if an allegation of child abuse is made, ensure as quickly as possible that the child(ren) are safe
  • encouraging children to ‘have a say’ and participate in all relevant organisational activities where possible, especially on issues that are important to them.

 

 

Staff and volunteers must not:

  • develop any ‘special’ relationships with children that could be seen as favouritism (for example, the offering of gifts or special treatment for specific children)
  • exhibit behaviours with children which may be construed as unnecessarily physical (for example inappropriate sitting on laps. Sitting on laps could be appropriate sometime, for example while reading a storybook to a small child in an open plan area)
  • put children at risk of abuse (for example, by locking doors)
  • do things of a personal nature that a child can do for themselves, such as toileting or changing clothes
  • engage in open discussions of a mature or adult nature in the presence of children (for example, personal social activities)
  • use inappropriate language in the presence of children
  • express personal views on cultures, race or sexuality in the presence of children
  • discriminate against any child, including because of culture, race, ethnicity or disability
  • have contact with a child or their family outside of our organisation without our child safety officer’s knowledge and/or consent (for example, no babysitting). Accidental contact, such as seeing people in the street, is appropriate)
  • have any online contact with a child or their family (unless necessary, for example providing families with e-newsletters)
  • ignore or disregard any suspected or disclosed child abuse.

By observing these standards you acknowledge your responsibility to immediately report any breach of this code to the Director.

If you believe a child is at immediate risk of abuse phone 000.

 

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

CHILD SAFE POLICY

Policy Code CSP009.01
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 21 August 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy describes our commitment to child safety.

This policy and procedure should be read in conjunction with the Preventing and Responding to Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation Policy.

This policy applies to all staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

 

2.0 POLICY

Our organisation is committed to child safety.

  • We want children to be safe, happy and empowered. We support and respect all children, as well as our staff and volunteers.
  • We are committed to the safety, participation and empowerment of all children.
  • We have zero tolerance of child abuse, and all allegations and safety concerns will be treated very seriously and consistently with our robust policies and procedures.
  • We have legal and moral obligations to contact authorities when we are worried about a child’s safety, which we follow rigorously.
  • Our organisation is committed to preventing child abuse and identifying risks early, and removing and reducing these risks.
  • Our organisation has robust human resources and recruitment practices for all staff and volunteers.
  • Our organisation is committed to regularly training and educating our staff and volunteers on child abuse risks.
  • We support and respect all children, as well as our staff and volunteers. We are committed to the cultural safety of Aboriginal children, the cultural safety of children from a culturally and/or linguistically diverse backgrounds, and to providing a safe environment for children with a disability.
  • We have specific policies, procedures and training in place that support our leadership team, staff and volunteers to achieve these commitments.

If you believe a child is at immediate risk of abuse phone 000.

 

Our children

  • This policy is intended to empower children who are vital and active participants in our organisation. We involve them when making decisions, especially about matters that directly affect them. We listen to their views and respect what they have to say.
  • We promote diversity and tolerance in our organisation, and people from all walks of life and cultural backgrounds are welcome. In particular we:
    • promote the cultural safety, participation and empowerment of Aboriginal children
    • promote the cultural safety, participation and empowerment of children from culturally and/or linguistically diverse backgrounds
    • ensure that children with a disability are safe and can participate equally.

 

Our staff and volunteers

This policy guides our staff and volunteers on how to behave with children in our organisation.

All of our staff and volunteers must agree to abide by our code of conduct which specifies the standards of conduct required when working with children. All staff and volunteers, as well as children and their families, are given the opportunity to contribute to the development of the code of conduct.

Training and supervision

Training and education is important to ensure that everyone in our organisation understands that child safety is everyone’s responsibility.

Our organisational culture aims for all staff and volunteers (in addition to parents/carers and children) to feel confident and comfortable in discussing any allegations of child abuse or child safety concerns. We train our staff and volunteers to identify, assess, and minimise risks of child abuse and to detect potential signs of child abuse.

We also support our staff and volunteers through ongoing supervision to: develop their skills to protect children from abuse; and promote the cultural safety of Aboriginal children, the cultural safety of children from linguistically and/or diverse backgrounds, and the safety of children with a disability.

New employees and volunteers will be supervised regularly to ensure they understand our organisation’s commitment to child safety and that everyone has a role to play in protecting children from abuse, as well as checking that their behaviour towards children is safe and appropriate (please refer to this organisation’s code of conduct to understand appropriate behaviour further). Any inappropriate behaviour will be reported through appropriate channels, including the Queensland Police, depending on the severity and urgency of the matter.

 

Recruitment

We take all reasonable steps to employ skilled people to work with children. We develop selection criteria and advertisements which clearly demonstrate our commitment to child safety and an awareness of our social and legislative responsibilities. Our organisation understands that when recruiting staff and volunteers we have ethical as well as legislative obligations.

We actively encourage applications from Aboriginal peoples, people from culturally and/or linguistically diverse backgrounds and people with a disability.

All people engaged in child-related work, including volunteers, are required to hold a Working with Children Check and to provide evidence of this Check. Please see the https://www.bluecard.qld.gov.au/ website for further information.

We carry out reference checks and police record checks to ensure that we are recruiting the right people. We do retain our own records (but not the actual criminal record) if an applicant’s criminal history affected our decision making process.

If during the recruitment process a person’s records indicate a criminal history then the person will be given the opportunity to provide further information and context.

 

Fair procedures for personnel

The safety and wellbeing of children is our primary concern. We are also fair and just to personnel. The decisions we make when recruiting, assessing incidents, and undertaking disciplinary action will always be thorough, transparent, and based on evidence.

We record all allegations of abuse and safety concerns using our incident reporting form, including investigation updates. All records are securely stored.

If an allegation of abuse or a safety concern is raised, we provide updates to children and families on progress and any actions we as an organisation take.

 

Privacy

All personal information considered or recorded will respect the privacy of the individuals involved, whether they be staff, volunteers, parents or children, unless there is a risk to someone’s safety. We have safeguards and practices in place to ensure any personal information is protected. Everyone is entitled to know how this information is recorded, what will be done with it, and who will have access to it.

 

Legislative responsibilities

Our organisation takes our legal responsibilities seriously, including having risk management strategies in place to promote the wellbeing and safety of our clients.

 

Risk management

In addition to general occupational health and safety risks, we proactively manage risks of abuse to our children.

We have risk management strategies in place to identify, assess, and take steps to minimise child abuse risks, which include risks posed by physical environments (for example, any doors that can lock), and online environments (for example, no staff or volunteer is to have contact with a child in organisations on social media).

Regular review

This policy will be reviewed every year and following significant incidents if they occur. We will ensure that families and children have the opportunity to contribute. Where possible we do our best to work with local Aboriginal communities, culturally and/or linguistically diverse communities and people with a disability.

 

Allegations, concerns and complaints

Our organisation takes all allegations seriously and has practices in place to investigate thoroughly and quickly. Our staff and volunteers are trained to deal appropriately with allegations.

We work to ensure all children, families, staff and volunteers know what to do and who to tell if they observe abuse or are a victim, and if they notice inappropriate behaviour.

We all have a responsibility to report an allegation of abuse if we have a reasonable belief that an incident took place (see information about failure to disclose above).

If an adult has a reasonable belief that an incident has occurred then they must report the incident. Factors contributing to reasonable belief may be:

  • a child states they or someone they know has been abused (noting that sometimes the child may in fact be referring to themselves)
  • behaviour consistent with that of an abuse victim is observed
  • someone else has raised a suspicion of abuse but is unwilling to report it
  • observing suspicious behaviour.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED

 

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

WORKPLACE HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code WHSP001.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure demonstrates Holistic Home Care’s commitment to providing a workplace that is safe and minimises risks to the health and wellbeing of staff, clients, their families and all other stakeholders.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, and any additional staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

2.0 DEFINITIONS

Workplace – any place where work is carried out on behalf of Holistic Home Care.

Duty of care – A common law concept that refers to the responsibilities of organisations to provide people with an adequate level of protection against harm and all reasonable foreseeable risk of injury. In the context of this policy, duty of care refers to the responsibility of Holistic Home Care’s staff to provide clients, students, volunteers, contractors and anyone visiting the service with an adequate level of care and protection against reasonable foreseeable harm and injury.

 

3.0 POLICY

Holistic Home Care will conduct its activities in such a way as to provide an environment which, so far as possible, protects the health, safety and welfare of all people at the workplace and actively encourages safe working practices. To achieve this, every effort will be made in the areas of accident prevention, hazard control and removal, injury protection, health preservation and promotion. These aspects of working conditions will be given priority in organisational plans, policies and procedures, job instructions.

No task is so important as to compromise health and safety. Adequate consideration must be given to determine a safe and healthy work method for each activity undertaken.

Holistic Home Care is committed to ensuring that:

  • All relevant legislation and statutory requirements, codes of practice and Australian Standards are complied with;
  • Health and safety awareness and the development of hygienic and safe work practices are promoted;
  • Information, training, instruction and adequate protective equipment are provided;
  • Staff are consulted and cooperated with on health and safety matters and on ways to reduce workplace hazards and improve quality control systems;
  • Health and safety awareness and the development of a falls prevention;
  • Effective management of Epilepsy plans within clients home;
  • Effective accident analysis and incident and hazard reporting systems are maintained; and
  • The rehabilitation of injured staff is encouraged.
  • Workplace Health and Safety is the responsibility of all Holistic Home Care stakeholders – staff members, volunteers, contractors, clients, families, carers and visitors.
  • Holistic Home Care staff and volunteers are not expected to carry out work that is unsafe, and clients are not expected to tolerate unsafe work practices or service environments.

 

4.0 PROCEDURE

Responsibilities

The Director will:

  • comply with all relevant legislation and statutory requirements, codes of practice and industry standards and make adequate provision of resources to meet these requirements;
  • promote health and safety awareness and the development of healthy and safe working procedures;
  • provide information and where appropriate, training and/or instruction and adequate protective equipment;
  • consult with staff and volunteers on health and safety issues as well as identify and implement ways to reduce workplace hazards and improve control systems;
  • maintain effective accident analysis procedures and hazard reporting systems;
  • encourage the rehabilitation of injured staff;
  • set and regularly review health and safety objectives; and
  • seek feedback from staff and volunteers on matters relating to stress management techniques.

Staff members, volunteers, students and visitors are expected to:

  • comply with all relevant legislation and statutory requirements, safe working procedures, codes of practice and industry standards;
  • report, and where appropriate, rectify hazards, and participate in the analysis of accidents/incidents; and
  • accept responsibility for protecting themselves and others.

All staff and volunteers are responsible for ensuring that all plant, equipment and substances are safe and without risk to health when used in accordance with standard operating procedures.

  • Holistic Home Care has a no smoking policy. Staff, volunteers, students, clients and visitors are not permitted to smoke indoors, within the office, or on any covered patio area that is part of or attached to a building. Smoking is only permitted in designated outside smoking areas.

 

  • If staff or volunteers have any health problems or medical conditions requiring medication or that may require emergency assistance, it is advisable to notify senior staff or nominated Workplace Health and Safety (WH&S) Representative.
  • Guidelines on procedures for dealing with critical incidents or handling of blood and other body fluids can be obtained from senior staff.
  • All staff and volunteers are advised to take adequate breaks during the performance of repetitive tasks.
  • All staff and volunteers should be aware of the location of the First Aid Kit, incident reports and emergency numbers.
  • If a Position Description states that a current Senior First Aid Certificate is required, this must be organised by the staff member concerned.
  • Whenever cleaning, gardening and/or other chemical substances are kept on the premises, access should be limited to authorised personnel who have adequate knowledge and understanding of their safe storage and application.

Senior staff are responsible for their areas of control to ensure:

  • relevant health and safety policies and procedures are effectively implemented; all risks to health and safety are identified, assessed and effectively controlled;
  • the effectiveness of risk control measures are regularly monitored and deviations from standards are rectified;
  • staff members have adequate knowledge and skills to carry out their health and safety responsibilities;
  • staff members are consulted on any proposals for or changes to the workplace, work practices, policies or procedures which may affect the health and safety of staff members;
  • all incidents within their area of control are reported and investigated and basic cause and control strategies are identified.

Any workplace accident or incident (dangerous occurrence) which has the potential to result in injury or damage to property must be reported in the same manner as an incident or accident that results in injury or damage.

All accidents or incidents that result in an injury or illness at work must be reported to the Director (through senior staff) within 24 hours of the incident occurring.

 

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

 

 

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

 

FIRE SAFETY AND EMERGENCY POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code WHSP002.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure seeks to ensure the safety of staff, clients and other stakeholders during emergencies such as fire or other emergencies.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, and any additional staff, students, contractors and volunteers providing services in a Holistic Home Care facility.

 

2.0 RISK

People with disabilities may be more vulnerable to fire and other emergencies than are others in the community. Consideration of risk must extend beyond fires and other emergencies in the workplace. Emergencies may include heatwave conditions, fire and bushfire, and prolonged interruptions to power supply or transport systems. Consideration must be given to risk on a case by case basis, including the client’s mobility, dependence upon critical services, geographic isolation and other environmental factors. Where appropriate, a client-specific Crisis and Emergency Plan should be developed, in cooperation with other service providers where appropriate.

Fire and other emergencies in the working environment should be managed as per this policy. Where services are provided in the client’s home, risk treatment plans should be established appropriate to the potential hazards identified. See also the High Intensity Care Policy and Procedure and Clinical Waste Management Policy and Procedure.

 

3.0 POLICY

  • The health and safety of all of Holistic Home Care’s stakeholders is of paramount importance. Holistic Home Care is committed to the implementation of clear and effective fire safety and emergency procedures.
  • Holistic Home Care complies with all laws and mandatory standards relating to fire protection, health and general safety that apply to any premises the service owns or operates, irrespective of whether the relevant regulatory requirements place the obligation on the owner or occupier of those premises.
  • For services other than in the client’s home, Holistic Home Care is required to ensure that the people in its care are appropriately protected from fire risk. This includes in relation to Holistic Home Care’s premises, operational readiness and client placement.
  • Services funded to provide personal care, support and case management services to people living in the community have a key role in relation to the safety and welfare of clients. Holistic Home Care will support clients to improve their safety and resilience through promoting personal emergency planning.

 

3.0 PROCEDURE

Premises

  • Holistic Home Care’s premises meet relevant building local laws, regulations or legislation in force at the time of construction, including provisions that apply retrospectively (for example, requirement for smoke alarms). Any subsequent building works shall meet the relevant building approval provisions at the corresponding time.

 

Operational Readiness

  • The Director will ensure that appropriate operational readiness measures are developed, implemented and reviewed. This includes (but is not limited to):
  • fire emergency management and evacuation procedures;
  • training of staff to implement the procedures developed;
  • maintenance of all the fire safety systems and any deviations through an alternative solution.
  • Holistic Home Care will prepare for, respond to and recover from emergencies in accordance with the ‘all hazards’ approach. This includes, but is not limited to, fire, bushfire, flood, relocation, evacuation and prolonged service interruption.
  • In the event of an emergency, Holistic Home Care will ensure essential services are maintained as far as is practicable.

 

Supporting client emergency readiness

  • Holistic Home Care will actively work to improve the safety of vulnerable people in emergencies through encouraging and supporting clients (who meet the definition of a vulnerable person) to undertake personal emergency planning. Where there is recognised bushfire risk, specific bushfire planning will be undertaken in addition to basic personal emergency planning.
  • Holistic Home Care will screen clients to identify people who should be listed on a Vulnerable Persons Register (VPR) meet the definition of a vulnerable person and cannot identify personal or community support networks to help them in an emergency. Holistic Home Care will obtain informed consent from identified people and enter and maintain their information on VPRs.

 

Emergency Plans

  • The Director will prepare, test and annually review an Emergency Plan for the service, covering:
  • emergency contact details for key staff who have specific roles or responsibilities under the emergency plan, for example, fire wardens, floor wardens and first aid officers;
  • contact details for local emergency services, for example police, fire brigade and the poison information centre;
  • a description of the mechanisms for alerting people at the workplace to an emergency or possible emergency, for example sirens or bell alarms;
  • evacuation procedures including arrangements for assisting any people with hearing, vision or mobility impairment;
  • a map of Holistic Home Care’s workplace/s, illustrating the location of fire protection equipment, emergency exits and assembly points;
  • testing of emergency procedures, including the frequency of testing; and
  • information, training and instruction to relevant staff in relation to implementing the emergency procedures.
  • Holistic Home Care’s Emergency Plan, or a summary of key elements of the plan, will be readily accessible by staff and on display in Holistic Home Care’s premises.
  • Holistic Home Care’s Emergency Plan must be implemented in an emergency. Directions from emergency services workers must also be complied with.
  • The Director will review Holistic Home Care’s Emergency Plan at least annually and:
  • when there are changes to the workplace such as re-location or refurbishments;
  • when there are changes in the number or composition of staff including an increase in the use of temporary contractors;
  • when new activities have been introduced; and
  • after the plan has been tested.
  • The Director will prepare and regularly review premises Emergency Evacuation Plans for how people should evacuate the premises and where they should assemble if there is an emergency.
  • The Emergency Evacuation Plans will be displayed prominently in Holistic Home Care’s premises. Each Plan will clearly indicate its current location, where the exits are and where the assembly area is.
  • The Director (or delegate) will practice emergency and evacuation procedures with all staff (where applicable) at least every six months.

 

Fire Emergency

  • The Director will ensure that fire equipment is installed, suitable for risks specific to Holistic Home Care’s workplace and readily available in accordance with the relevant Australian Standards.
  • The Director will install signage within Holistic Home Care’s premises so people can find fire equipment quickly and identify what type of fire it can be used on.
  • Emergency exits will be kept unlocked, unblocked and all exit signs will be maintained and kept illuminated.
  • Fire extinguishers will be placed away from heat sources and regularly maintained.
  • All staff (where applicable) will be trained in how to use fire equipment and know what type of fire extinguishers to use for different types of fires.
  • The Director will ensure fire equipment is regularly tested by Holistic Home Care’s local fire authority or fire equipment supplier in accordance with Holistic Home Care’s Internal Review and External Audit Schedule.
  • Staff will ensure that no source of ignition is introduced to a confined space, if there is a likelihood of fire or explosion in that space.
  • If the maintenance or repair of any structure or plant used for the storage or handling of dangerous goods involves the use of welding, cutting or other processes that generate heat or introduce ignition sources, the Director will ensure that the risk of a fire or explosion involving the dangerous goods is eliminated, or reduced so far as is reasonably practicable if it cannot be eliminated.
  • For services provided to a client in their own primary residence (whether leased or owned by the client), Holistic Home Care expects that the client (and where appropriate, the owner of the premises) will have responsibility for their own fire safety and ensure that the premises meet all relevant building local laws and regulations or legislation.

Crisis and Emergency Plan

This Crisis and Emergency Plan prepares Holistic Home Care’s service continuity and delivery against the impact of crises such as extreme weather events and their attending uncertainty.

 

RISK ASSESSMENT

Crises and emergencies can vary in intensity, duration and effect. Because damage to property, equipment and information storage systems can cause extended disruption to services, this assessment primarily considers the significant effects of extreme weather events on clients, staff and service delivery.

Typical effects of extreme weather events:

  • risk to client wellbeing – people with disabilities are most at risk in extreme weather than others.
  • changes to client needs
  • reduction in staff availability due to disruption of transport systems and personal crises
  • disruption in supply of goods necessary for service delivery
  • disruption to power supply and other utilities
  • disruption to telecommunications systems
  • disruption to internet
  • failure of data storage facilities and loss of data
  • damage to property and equipment

Priorities:

  • client safety and wellbeing
  • staff safety and wellbeing
  • data security
  • service delivery equipment

Authorities to Trigger Plan

The Director will appoint (or assume the role of) a Business Continuity Planning Coordinator, responsible for

  • business continuity during extreme weather events and similar disruptions;
  • carrying out the Crisis and Emergency Plan;
  • overseeing communications with staff regarding the weather event; and
  • assigning tasks within the Plan

The Director and the Business Continuity Planning Coordinator have the authority to:

  • trigger this Plan
  • run exercises to test the plan as necessary.

Table: Crisis and Emergency Plan

  CLIENT SAFETY STAFF & STAFF SAFETY DATA SECURITY ESSENTIAL SERVICES ESSENTIAL EQUIPMENT OTHER
PRE-EVENT

 LONGTERM PLANNING

Identify critical supports

Store client details in secure location

Identify key staff and their crisis roles

Store staff details in secure location

Back up data regularly

Store data securely off-site and available off-line

Identify essential services

Liaise with emergency services where applicable

Develop register of essential equipment

Organise emergency storage

Consult suppliers / contractors re crisis plans

Check first aid kits

Discuss plans with other service providers, police, etc.

Ensure appropriate insurance

DURING EVENT Contact clients re service status, their needs Keep staff informed

Assess staff availability

Check security of data Provide essential services where possible.

Liaise with emergency services

Secure essential equipment where possible.

Check supplies of essential goods

POST-EVENT

RE-ESTABLISH & REVIEW

Contact to assess well-being.

Inform of service status.

Arrange continued support

Check and restore information systems. Resume non-essential services once: Data secure; suitable staff available, essential supplies available. Check, repair or replace essential equipment.

Re-stock first aid kits.

Review service cooperation during crisis and improve Crisis and Emergency Plan

 

 

 

PRE-EVENT (LONG-TERM PREPARATION)

Client Wellbeing

Holistic Home Care will:

  • identify supports critical to clients’ wellbeing, which must be maintained during a crisis, and prepare contingency plans in the event that clients are inaccessible to suitably qualified support workers (See High Intensity Care Policy And Procedure);
  • store client contact details in a secure, accessible, off-site location

 

Staff Resourcing

Holistic Home Care will:

  • identify key management and service-delivery personnel and consult them regarding the roles in this Plan.
  • store staff contact details in a secure, accessible, off-site location

Data Security

Holistic Home Care will ensure:

  • that data is backed-up regularly,
  • that backups are stored securely and off-site, and
  • and data is accessible off-line

 

Essential Services

Holistic Home Care will:

  • identify essential service functions to be maintained during, or restored immediately after, a disruptive event.

 

Essential Equipment and Supplies:

Holistic Home Care will:

  • develop a register of service-essential equipment that can be removed off-site in case of flood
  • organise emergency storage facilities for removed essential equipment
  • consider alternative power supplies to run essential equipment in blackout conditions
  • consult with key suppliers and subcontractors to clarify whether they have robust business continuity plans in place.
  • ensure first-aid and emergency kits are kept stocked and functional

 

Community Relations

Holistic Home Care will:

  • subscribe to a local service issuing weather alerts
  • discuss co-operative service-continuity plans with other local service-providers
  • liaise with Police and Emergency Services.

Insurance Coverage

Holistic Home Care will:

  • identify severe weather event scenarios, mapping these against its insurance coverage to identify gaps.

 

 

 

DURING THE EVENT

Client Wellbeing

Holistic Home Care will:

  • prioritise clients’ immediate safety
  • contact clients to inform them of service status
  • contact clients regularly during protracted weather events to ascertain needs and wellbeing

 

Staff Safety and Resourcing

Holistic Home Care will:

  • prioritise staff safety
  • inform staff as weather alerts are issued

Staff will:

  • notify Holistic Home Care if unable to attend work

Essential Equipment and Supplies:

Holistic Home Care will:

  • ensure the safety of service-essential equipment (as conditions dictate)
  • contact key suppliers and subcontractors to ensure supply.

 

POST-EVENT

Clients

Holistic Home Care will contact clients (or carers):

  • to assess wellbeing
  • inform them of current service status
  • arrange continuation of client services

Data Security

Holistic Home Care will check the integrity of information systems and restore as necessary.

Essential Services

Holistic Home Care will resume services as quickly as possible after a disruptive event, provided that

  • information systems are functioning and secure;
  • available staff are qualified to carry out service delivery; and
  • supplies of service-essential goods are available.

Essential Equipment and Supplies:

Holistic Home Care will:

  • check that all service-essential equipment is functioning; repair or replace as necessary
  • ensure first-aid and emergency kits are re-stocked.

Community Relations

The Director (or delegate) will re-assess co-operative service-continuity plans with other local service-providers and liaise with them to make improvements to the Crisis and Emergency Plan

Review Plan

The Director will review the measures taken to preserve business continuity during the extreme weather event and make appropriate improvements to the Crisis and Emergency Plan

Holistic Home Care will revisit and retest this Plan periodically, particularly when new services are introduced, and to include learnings from previous tests. The plan will be reviewed at least once per year, to ensure it remains current.

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changed to include Crisis and Emergency Plan Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

CHEMICAL USE AND STORAGE POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code WHSP003.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2, 4

 

  • PURPOSE AND SCOPE

Incidents involving chemicals and fuels can result in explosions or fire, causing death or serious injury, as well as large-scale damage to property and the surrounding environment. Unsafe use can also cause cancer, poisoning, burns, blindness and other serious health problems. This policy and procedure seeks to ensure the safety of staff, clients and other stakeholders when handling and storing chemicals.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, and any additional staff, students, contractors and volunteers when working on a Holistic Home Care operated facility.

  • POLICY
  • The health and safety of all Holistic Home Care’s stakeholders is of paramount importance. Holistic Home Care is committed to ensuring that when chemicals are introduced onto Holistic Home Care’s premises that they are recorded, handled and disposed of appropriately.
  • Workplace chemicals and fuels can be classified as dangerous goods, hazardous substances or both.
  • PROCEDURE

Risk and Hazard Management

  • In accordance with the Risk Management Policy and Procedure, the Director will implement a risk management process regarding chemical use and storage:
    • actively identifying hazards;
    • implement risk controls to eliminate or reduce the risks associated with these hazards; and
    • reviewing and if necessary revising these risk controls on a monthly basis.

Identify dangerous goods and hazardous substances

Chemical register

  • The Director will ensure details of all dangerous goods and hazardous substances stored or handled in the workplace are entered into a Chemical Register.
  • The Chemical Register is to be reviewed when new or additional quantities of chemicals are introduced into the workplace, or when risk controls have changed, or are no longer effective.

Restricted chemicals

  • The Director will develop a Guidance Sheet: Restricted Chemicals that will provide a list of restricted substances not permitted in Holistic Home Care workplaces at any time.

Material safety data sheets

  • The Director will ensure a hard copy collection of current Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) and Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) from manufacturers and suppliers is maintained. The MSDSs and SDSs obtained for each chemical must be the authorised version prepared by the manufacturer.
  • The Chemical Register and associated MSDSs and SDSs are to be kept by the Director in a suitable location which is known and accessible to all staff members in the workplace, as well as any other person who is likely to be exposed to the dangerous goods or hazardous substances.

Storage

  • The Director will ensure that storage of chemicals is conducted in accordance with the Code of practice for the storage and handling of dangerous goods 2013.
  • Storage quantities should be kept to a minimum to cater for demand and excessive storage for long periods should be avoided.

Signage

  • The Director will ensure that if the workplace is storing dangerous goods exceeding minor storage quantities, placards are provided as a visual warning.
  • The Director will ensure that all purpose-built cupboards, cabinets and refrigerators for storing chemicals are labelled to indicate the type and class of chemicals being stored in them. Additional warning signs may also be required, such as “DO NOT USE TO STORE FOOD”.

Labelling

The Director will ensure that all dangerous goods and hazardous substance storage containers are clearly labelled. The label on the container in which the dangerous good or hazardous substance is supplied must remain intact, legible and unaltered. The date of receipt of a hazardous substance should be marked on the original container to allow for monitoring of the age of the chemical and promote the use of older materials first.

  • Containers with unknown substances in them should be labelled ‘CAUTION DO NOT USE: UNKNOWN SUBSTANCE’ and then disposed of appropriately.

Handling Dangerous Goods

  • The Director will ensure Safe Work Procedures (SWP) specific to the handling of dangerous goods and hazardous substances stored in the workplace are developed and implemented.

Emergency procedures

  • The Director will ensure that appropriate emergency management provisions are available for use in the event of a chemical emergency. The emergency management provisions may include:
  • spill kits or containment equipment;
  • safe work procedures for spills or release of chemicals;
  • fire blankets/extinguishers;
  • first aid kits;
  • eye wash stations/eye wash kits/emergency showers;
  • emergency shutdown procedures for equipment;
  • appropriate numbers of trained emergency wardens and first aiders; and
  • appropriately displayed emergency contact details.

 

Health surveillance

  • The Director will regularly refer to current MSDSs and SDSs to determine the health surveillance requirements for any staff members exposed to hazardous substances in the workplace.

Chemical Waste and Disposal of Chemicals

  • The Director will ensure that chemical waste is properly packaged, labelled and stored in suitable designated areas whilst awaiting collection. Labelling must include at a minimum the product identifier, workplace details and a hazard pictogram consistent with the correct classification of the chemical (if relevant).
  • The Director will ensure dangerous goods, hazardous substances and chemical waste are disposed of as per the Code of practice for the storage and handling of dangerous goods 2013.

Consultation, Information and Training

  • The Director will ensure that arrangements are in place for consultation with staff members in relation to chemical management. Consultation should occur in relation to:
    • the introduction of new chemicals to the workplace;
    • the identification and assessment of risks associated with chemicals at the workplace;
    • decisions about control measures to be implemented; and
    • induction and training requirements.
  • Hazard identification and incident reporting relating to chemicals should be carried out in accordance with the Incident Management Policy and Procedure.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changed to include Crisis and Emergency Plan Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

 

INFECTION CONTROL POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code WHSP004.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 6 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2,4

 

  • PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure seeks to ensure that Holistic Home Care minimises the risk of the spread of infectious diseases in its work environments.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, and any additional staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

  • DEFINITIONS

Infectious diseases – also known as communicable diseases; caused by organisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. These micro-organisms are able to invade and reproduce in the human body, and then cause harmful effects. In healthcare settings, the main modes for transmission of infectious agents are contact (including bloodborne), droplet and airborne.

 

  • POLICY
  • Holistic Home Care’s Director has a duty of care and must take all reasonable steps to safeguard clients, other staff and stakeholders from infection.
  • PROCEDURE
  • Any staff member with any infectious disease, including the flu, is required to stay away from the workplace until such time they are cleared by a doctor. A medical certificate is required to be presented with the staff member’s timesheet for payment of sick days.
  • Notifiable diseases are diseases that must be reported to the Health Department by health practitioners. Any staff member that has a notifiable disease must not attend work until such time as they are cleared by their doctor.

Standard Precautions

  • Standard precautions must be implemented when cleaning surfaces and facilities. Staff must wear suitable gloves and other protective clothing appropriate for the task. Protective eyewear must be worn where splashing is likely to occur.
  • Toilets, sinks, washbasins, baths, shower areas, and surrounding areas should be cleaned regularly or as required. Cleaning methods for these items should avoid generation of aerosols. Although environmental surfaces play a minor role in the transmission of infections, a regular cleaning and maintenance schedule is necessary to maintain a safe environment.
  • Surfaces should be cleaned on a regular basis using only cleaning procedures that minimise dispersal of micro-organisms into the air.
  • Routine surface cleaning should be undertaken as follows:
  • clean and dry work surfaces before and after usage or when visibly soiled;
  • spills should be dealt with immediately;
  • use detergent and warm water for routine cleaning;
  • where surface disinfection is required, use in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions;
  • clean and dry surfaces before and after applying disinfectants;
  • empty buckets after use, wash with detergent and warm water and store dry; and mops should be cleaned in detergent and warm water then stored dry.
  • Floors should be cleaned daily or as necessary with a vacuum cleaner. Alternatively, damp dusting or cleaning with a dust-retaining mop is acceptable.

 

Person-centered approach to Infection Control

  • A person-centred approach to providing support includes putting clients at the centre of infection prevention and control and enabling them to participate in their care process.
  • To support a two-way approach to infection prevention and control and encourage client participation, the organisation will:
  • familiarise clients with its infection prevention and control strategies;
  • encourage clients to disclose their health or risk status if there is a potential risk or source of infection;
  • provide opportunities for clients to identify and communicate risks and encourage them to use feedback procedures through the service’s feedback, compliments and complaints processes;
  • provide educational materials about infection prevention and control using a variety of media (e.g. posters, printed material, educational videos) in a variety of accessible formats; and
  • inform clients about the protocols for protecting their privacy and confidentiality.

 

Reporting

  • Incidents relating to infection control or infectious diseases should be reported in accordance with Holistic Home Care’s Incident Management Policy and Procedure.

Sharps Management Flowchart

 

 

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changed to include Crisis and Emergency Plan Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

 

ELECTRICAL SAFETY POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code WHSP005.01
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2,4

 

  • PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy sets out Holistic Home Care’s compliance with the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Cwlth) in the safe use, installation and management of electrical equipment.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

  • DEFINITIONS

Electrical Installation – a group of items of electrical equipment, permanently electrically connected together and supplied from mains power or equivalent source.

Electrical Equipment –  any apparatus, appliance, cable, conductor, fitting, insulator, material, meter or wire, operated by electricity at a voltage greater than extra-low voltage.

Residual Current Devices (RCDs)

The risk of workplace fatalities and fire can be reduced by the use of RCDs. RCDs, or ‘safety switches’ immediately switch off the supply of electricity when electricity leaks to earth. RCDs do not protect in all circumstances: e.g., if an unearthed person contacts both active and neutral conductors while handling faulty plugs or electrical equipment.

  • For new installations, Minimum Level Design and Construction Specifications state that an RCD must be installed at the switchboard by a licensed Electrical Installation worker.
  • RCDs can be either non-portable (‘fixed’) or portable.
  • Fixed RCDs must be installed by an appropriately licensed electrical installation worker.
  • RCDs should be included in routine safety checks:
    • Fixed RSDs should be tested at least 6-monthly and by a ‘competent person’ every twelve months.
    • Portable RCDs should be tested at least 3-monthly and by a ‘competent person’ every twelve months.
  • RCDs should be included in routine safety checks.

 

Where practicable, RCDs should be used in line with the supply of electricity to ‘plug in’ electrical equipment.

RCDs are required wherever:

  • Electrical Equipment’s normal operating conditions expose it to damage: e.g., moisture, heat, vibration, mechanical damage, corrosive chemicals or dust;
  • Electrical Equipment moves while operating: e.g., electric lawn mowers, vacuum cleaners, floor polishers and extension cords;
  • Electrical Equipment is moved for use in multiple locations;
  • a circuit supplies a wet use appliance, if practicable.
  • POLICY

On Holistic Home Care premises, only a suitably licensed electrician must undertake:

  • electrical installations;
  • testing and repair of appliances.

The Director (or delegate) is responsible for routine Workplace Safety checks, in line with the Internal Review and External Audit Policy and Procedure.

Staff are required to notify the Director of any faulty, hazardous or suspect electrical equipment or fittings.

  • PROCEDURE

Installation and removal of electrical installations

  • All Electrical Installation work on Holistic Home Care premises must be carried out by a licenced electrical contractor.
  • An Electrical Installation that has been constructed, altered or repaired must not be put into service until:
  • the certificate of electrical safety has been issued and the installation inspected if required; and
  • the installation has been tested and the electrical contractor has verified that the alteration, addition or repair is compliant with AS3000 (Electrical installations).

 

Portable Electrical Equipment on Holistic Home Care Premises

Electrical hazards will be minimised on Holistic Home Care premises by:

  • the choice of lowest-risk appliances and other equipment:
  • convection heaters – not fan or bar heaters;
  • EPODs (power boards with overload protection devices) – not double adapters.
  • taking care not to overload power circuits.
  • using extension leads for temporary applications only, ensuring leads are:
  • placed to avoid creating tripping hazards and
  • damage to the lead’s insulation; and
  • not used in damp or wet conditions unless they are specially designed for these conditions.

 

Inspecting and testing of RCDs

  • The Director will ensure that all RCDs used at the workplace are tested regularly.
  • A record of testing must be kept until the device is next tested or disposed of.

 

Testing, Tagging and Repairing Electrical Equipment

All electrical equipment used on Holistic Home Care premises should be certified safe, so far as is practicable.

  • Appliances should be inspected, tested and tagged:
  • in accordance with the requirements of AS/NZS 3760:2010 – In-service safety inspection and testing of electrical equipment and the Electrical Safety Act 2002 (Qld).
  • at intervals not exceeding those set out by AS3760:2010 (a tolerance of two weeks is acceptable); and
  • before being returned to service or after any repair or servicing that could have affected the electrical safety of the appliance.

Except for:

  • equipment not in use;
  • new electrical equipment, which should be fitted with a tag that states:
    • that the equipment is ‘new to service’;
    • the date of entry into service; and
    • the date when the first electrical safety test is due
  • equipment beyond its testing date, which should be fitted with an isolation tag indicating that tagging is required and must be completed prior to use;
  • personal laptops. (Staff, clients and visitors are encouraged, however, to have their laptops tested and tagged using an approved person or company);

Electrical appliances brought from home by staff, clients or visitors, for use on Holistic Home Care property are subject to the same testing and tagging procedure as for appliances owned or leased by Holistic Home Care. Appliances should be tested and tagged prior to their use on Holistic Home Care property. Testing and tagging is the responsibility of, and at the expense of, the owner.

Any equipment purchased second-hand must be tested and tagged before first use.

Commercially hired equipment must fulfil inspection and testing requirements at the commencement of each hire.

Risk management

  • Staff should inform the Director if they suspect Electrical Equipment in the workplace is:
  • unsafe; or
  • could be rendered unsafe given unexpected conditions (e.g., unsuitable equipment in a wet area which might flood).
  • Suspected hazards must be identified and action taken to eliminate it, or minimise it so far as is practicable. See Holistic Home Care’s Risk Management Policy and Procedure.

 

Unsafe electrical equipment in the workplace

  • The Director will ensure that any unsafe or suspect Electrical Equipment is
  • disconnected immediately
  • labelled to avoid reconnection
  • tested and repaired or replaced
  • An Incident Report should be lodged when the hazard is discovered to enable an accurate investigation.

 

Hazard and incident reporting

  • All hazards and injuries relating to electrical safety must be reported immediately in accordance with Holistic Home Care’s Incident Management Policy and Procedure.
  • Any hazard or injury resulting from the use of portable Electrical Equipment must be reported immediately using Holistic Home Care’s Incident Report.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS practise standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

INCIDENT MANAGEMENT POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code WHSP006.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2,4

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure provides guidelines for reporting, investigating and applying appropriate control measures when an accident, incident (including critical incidents) or near miss occurs.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, and any additional staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

Note: This policy and procedure relates to workplace incidents. For client incidents, reportable to the NDIS Commission, see the Preventing and Responding to Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation Policy and Procedure.

2.0 DEFINITIONS

Accident – an unforeseen event that causes damage to property, injury or death.

Incident – an occurrence that causes (or could have caused, in the case of a ‘Near Miss’) damage to property, injury/illness or death.

Near Miss – any incident that occurred at Holistic Home Care, which, although not resulting in any injury, illness or damage, had the potential to do so.

Hazard – a situation that has the potential to harm a person (cause death, illness or injury) or environment or damage property.

Hazard identification – A process that involves identifying all foreseeable hazards in the workplace and understanding the possible harm that each hazard may cause.

Hazard managementA structured process of hazard identification, risk assessment and control, aimed at providing safe and healthy conditions for staff members, contractors and visitors while on the premises.

Harm – Includes death, or injury, illness (physical or psychological) or disease that may be suffered by a person as a consequence of exposure to a hazard.

Reportable incidentstaff member-to-client incidents of sexual assault, sexual misconduct, assault, fraud, ill-treatment or neglect; client-to-client incidents of sexual or physical assault (causing serious injury or involving the use of a weapon), or that form a pattern of abuse; Contravention of an AVO taken out to protect a person with a disability; serious, unexplained injury of a person with a disability; the death of a person; a serious injury or illness of a person; or a dangerous incident.

3.0 POLICY

Staff are required to be vigilant in reporting incidents when they occur so that appropriate support can be provided to those affected and the circumstances can be analysed to reduce the likelihood of a similar event occurring again.

All staff, contractors, volunteers and students have a responsibility to ensure that details of any incident are recorded and reported to their immediate supervisor (or Director, as appropriate).

4.0 PROCEDURE

Responding to Incidents

  • Assess the situation and check for danger.
  • Remove the person from danger if it is safe to do so.
  • Call Emergency Services (dial 000) if required.
  • Attend to the immediate needs of the person/s involved and re-establish a safe environment.
  • Assess the situation and ensure no others are at risk of harm.
  • Do not alter the scene (unless necessary to reduce risk of further harm or damage).
  • Notify relevant emergency contacts by telephone as soon as practicable should the person need medical treatment.
  • Should the person not need medical treatment, notify the parent, family member or carer when they arrive to collect the person.

Reporting Incidents

  • All incidents and near misses must be reported to the Director (or delegate) as soon as practicable and within 24 hours through completion of an Incident Report. Level 1 incidents (see External Reporting, below) must be reported to the Director immediately.
  • Where an incident results in an injury to a staff member, this must be recorded in Holistic Home Care’s Incident Report Register. The register should be completed by the injured staff member or by someone on their behalf. The register will record:
  • the name of the staff member;
  • the person’s occupation or job title;
  • the time and date of the injury;
  • the person’s exact location at the time of the injury;
  • the names of witnesses, if any, to the injury;
  • the date on which the entry in the register is made;
  • the name of the person making the entry.
  • If an incident involves potential, suspected, alleged or actual harm, abuse, neglect or criminal activity, it must be reported as per Holistic Home Care’s Preventing and Responding to Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation policy and referred to the Director immediately.

 

 

Reportable Incidents

  • If an incident is Reportable (or it is not certain whether it is Reportable) it must be reported to the Director immediately. Information required includes the:
  • name and address of the person giving notice;
  • date and time of the event;
  • place where the event happened;
  • apparent cause;
  • nature and extent of the damage;
  • work that was being carried out at the time of the incident; and
  • name and contact details of any injured or affected parties.

External Reporting

Level One Incidents

  • Level One incidents are very serious incidents, with a significant risk of or actual harm or death, injury, loss or damage; and an immediate and/or major consequence for the person/s involved or the provision of service.
  • Level One incidents require:
    • immediate verbal notification to the Regional Director, Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services;
    • a critical incident report form submitted within four business hours of the staff member becoming aware of the incident.
  • Level One incidents include:
  • Death of a person with a disability
    • who was a child or young person known to Child Safety in the previous 12 months; or
    • which is defined as a ‘death in care’ under the Coroners Act 2003 (Qld); or
    • where another client, foster or kinship carer, or staff member is involved in the death; or
    • while attending or using the service.
    • Life threatening injuries
    • Hospitalisation, due to injury, of a child or young person known to Child Safety – currently or within the previous twelve months
    • Abduction;
    • Physical assault or injury requiring hospitalisation, emergency medical treatment or ambulance attendance;
    • Alleged rape, sexual assault or serious assault of a child under 14 years.
  • Level one client incident reports must be sent to the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disabilities designated divisional office within 4 business hours of Holistic Home Care becoming aware of the incident verbal advice provided immediately to the Regional Director.

 

Level Two Incidents

  • Level Two incidents involve events that threaten the health, safety and/or wellbeing of clients or staff, but do not have an immediate or major consequence for clients, staff and or the public, including, but not limited to:
    • Serious injury to a person that results in hospitalisation
    • Alleged rape, sexual assault or serious assault
    • Attempted suicide
    • Missing Child
    • Missing person, where there are serious concerns for their safety or wellbeing due to their vulnerability
    • Alleged abuse, neglect or exploitation of a person with a disability.
  • Level two critical client incident reports must be sent to the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disabilities designated divisional office by 5pm the next business day of notification of the incident of Holistic Home Care becoming aware of the incident and verbal advice provided immediately to the Regional Director.
  • The person with management or control of the workplace must ensure, so far as reasonably practicable, that the site where the incident occurred is not disturbed until either Workplace Health and Safety Queensland or the Director advise that the area is no longer required to be preserved.
  • The Director will track progress and outcomes of accidents, incidents and near misses in the Incident Register and refer any relevant items for inclusion in the Continuous Improvement Plan.
  • Accidents, incidents and near misses are to be reported to the Management Team monthly by the Director as part of their WHS reporting, where a management team is in place.

Investigating and Resolving Incidents

  • The Director will work with Workplace Health and Safety Queensland and/or other relevant authorities to investigate the incident.
  • The Director or their nominated representative will:
  • commence investigations immediately upon receiving a completed Incident Report and, where a staff member is injured, involve them in the investigation;
  • implement the most effective controls practicable that do not introduce other hazards, and monitor and review these;
  • consult with staff who are, or are likely to be, directly affected;
  • provide information and feedback to the Management Team; and
  • track all relevant information in Holistic Home Care’s Incident Register.
  • Upon completion of the investigation the Director must finalise the relevant Incident Report form and record the outcomes in the Incident Register.
  • The completed Incident Report should be stored on the relevant staff member’s and/or client’s file.

 

Debrief and Support

  • For all persons involved in an accident, incident or near miss, if required, the Director must:
  • facilitate an informal debrief amongst supervisors, colleagues or peers; and
  • ensure appropriate support and access to counselling is made available.
  • For information regarding Workers Compensation, see the Human Resources Policy and Procedure and Return to Work Policy and Procedure.

·       Incident Management Flowchart

 

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changed to include incident management flowchart including incidents reportable to the NDIS Commission (for details of NDIS reporting obligations see the Preventing and Responding to Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation Policy and Procedure Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

 

 

MANUAL HANDLING POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code WHSP007.01
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

  • PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure provides guidelines for manual handling and applying appropriate control measures when assisting clients

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, and any additional staff, students, contractors and volunteers.  

 

2.0 DEFINITION

Manual handling includes any tasks which require a person to lift, lower, push, pull, hold, or carry any object, animal or person.

  • POLICY

Holistic Home Care’s Director has a duty of care and must take all reasonable steps to safeguard clients, other staff and stakeholders from Injury due to manual handling.

 

Management Responsibilities

  • Minimise the need for manual handling;
  • Provide a work environment that is designed to allow the safe performance of manual handling tasks;
  • Undertake task risk assessments as required;
  • Implement appropriate control measures;
  • Provide employee information and training.

 

Staff Responsibilities

  • Employees have a responsibility not to undertake any manual handling activities that may cause themselves or others harm;
  • Adhere to information, instruction and training provided;
  • Immediately bring instances having the potential to cause harm to the attention of the Manager;
  • Advise the Manager of any existing physical conditions that might affect their ability to manage tasks safely.

Design and Individual Differences

Plant, equipment, and containers used in the workplace are to be designed, constructed, and maintained to reduce risk when undertaking manual handling tasks.  Tasks should be designed to fit the person by considering individual differences such as body dimension, and physical and functional capacity.

To reduce the risks of injury consider:

  • Minimise the lifting and lowering forces exerted;
  • Avoid the need for bending, twisting and reaching movements;
  • Reduce pushing, pulling, carrying and holding;
  • Size, surface characteristics, stability, and weight of objects;
  • Workplace layout and general environment;
  • Work posture and space requirements;
  • Storage;
  • Person’s skills and experience.

Task and Weight

Handling any weight can represent a risk to health and safety.  Lifting, lowering or carrying loads the following is recommended:

  • In a seated position do not lift loads in excess of 4.5 kg
  • In a standing position do not lift loads in excess of 16-20 kg
  • Mechanical aids should be considered for loads 16-55 kg
  • No person should lift, lower, or carry loads above 55 kg

Posture and Distance

Working postures result from task demands and work area design.  Posture effects the muscular effort needed to perform a job, and how quickly muscles fatigue.  During manual handling, bending, and/or twisting of the spine should be avoided.

Tasks should be designed to:

  • Minimise twisting the trunk or bending to the side;
  • Reaching below mid-thigh height;
  • Reaching above shoulder height;
  • Reaching beyond 50 cm in a horizontal distance in front of the body;
  • Reduce excessive bending of the wrist;
  • Frequently used objects should be placed within easy reach.

Repetition and Duration

Repetition is a major component of most musculoskeletal disorders.   Work must be performed continuously for a minimum of 60 minutes in order to be considered repetitive.  A person’s ability to continue prolonged exertion can be influenced by available energy reserves, physical fitness, and the relative work load.

  • Employees should use different muscle groups and vary their posture.
  • Lifting/lowering less than once every five minutes is the best practice.
  • Increasing frequency or duration decreases the maximum permissible weight.

Nature of Loads

Object weight, size, shape, and material can affect the risk of injury.  Factors to consider include the size and shape of the load, the design, and texture of handles, and stability.

To reduce the risk of injury:

  • Modify the shape or size;
  • Use rigid containers;
  • Use appropriate lifting devise;
  • Use comfortable, safe, and well fitted gloves;
  • Reinforce cardboard handles;
  • Ensure outside surfacing is easy to grip.

Environment

Environmental factors can affect the risk of injury and overall employee’s well-being.  Factors to be considered include climate, lighting, space, and floors.  Housekeeping and footwear have a particular relevance for risk of slips, trips, and falls.

To reduce the risk of injury:

  • Ensure adequate lighting;
  • Keep floors and work surfaces free of clutter;
  • Ensure good housekeeping in and around work areas;
  • Ensure comfortable climate control.

 

Safe Lifting Techniques

Principles of Safe Lifting:

  • Plan the lift.
  • Consider your physical ability to handle the load. If in doubt, get assistance. Avoid lifting loads more than 16 – 20 kg.
  • Place your feet close to the object and keep a balanced position. Bend the knees in a semi squat to a comfortable degree and get a good handhold.
  • Use your leg muscles to lift the load.
  • Keep the load as close to the body for as long as possible while lifting.
  • Keep the head up and chin out.
  • Move smoothly.
  • Set the load down by using your leg muscles, lower the load by bending your knees in a semi squat to a comfortable degree.

 

            People Handling

People handling refers to any workplace activity where a person is physically moved, supported, or restrained at a workplace.

Individual Support Plans are to detail an individual’s handling procedure to ensure the safety and wellbeing of employees and participants.

 

 

 

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

 

 

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

PART 2. CLIENT SERVICE DELIVERY

This section outlines processes in place for the delivery of services to clients under the NDIS scheme. Policies and procedures describe how the organisation delivers services and protects the rights of clients, their families and other stakeholders.

 

PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code CAP001.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 1

 

  • PURPOSE AND SCOPE

To ensure that management of clients’ personal information meets all relevant legislative and regulatory requirements.

This policy and procedure applies to current and potential clients, their carers and family members.

  • DEFINITIONS

Personal information – Recorded information (including images) or opinion, whether true or not, from which the identity (including those up to thirty years deceased) could be reasonably ascertained.

Sensitive information – Information or an opinion about an individual’s racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, membership of a political party, religious beliefs or affiliations, philosophical beliefs, membership of a professional or trade association, membership of a trade union, sexual preference or practices, or criminal record. This is also considered to be personal information.

Health information – Any information or an opinion about the physical, mental or psychological health or ability (at any time) of an individual.

Information Privacy – refers to the control of the collection, use, disclosure and disposal of information and the individual’s right to control how their personal information is handled.

  • POLICY

Holistic Home Care is committed to the transparent management of personal and health information about its clients and staff.

This commitment includes protecting the privacy of personal information, in accordance with the Australian Privacy Principles (APPs) set out in the Privacy Act 1988 (Cwlth) amended by the Privacy Amendment (Enhancing Privacy Protection) Act 2012 (Cwlth).

  • PROCEDURE

Personal information

Personal information may include:

  • name,
  • date of birth,
  • gender,
  • current and previous addresses,
  • residency status,
  • telephone numbers and e-mail addresses,
  • bank account details,
  • tax file number,
  • driver’s licence number,
  • Centrelink information,
  • photographs,
  • race or ethnicity, and
  • medical history or information provided by a health service.

In collecting personal information, Holistic Home Care will inform the client:

  • that information is being collected;
  • the purposes for collection;
  • who will have access to the information;
  • the right to seek access to, and/or correct, the information; and
  • the right to make complaint or appeal decisions about the handling of their information.

Client information is used to:

  • assess and provide services;
  • administer and manage those services;
  • evaluate and improve those services;
  • contribute to research;
  • contact family, carers, or other third parties if required; and
  • meet our obligations under the NDIS.

Clients are to be provided with the Client Consent Form at the time of commencing service with Holistic Home Care. This form is to be

  • signed and placed in the client’s file;
  • held securely with access limited to staff members in the performance of their role.

Updating Client Information

To ensure that client information is accurate, complete, current, relevant and not misleading, Holistic Home Care checks personal details and updates client files accordingly:

  • whenever reviewing a client’s service; and / or
  • upon being informed of changes or inaccuracies by clients or other stakeholders

There will be no charge for any correction of personal information.

Where Holistic Home Care has previously disclosed client personal information to other parties, should the client request us to notify these parties of any change to their details, we must take reasonable steps to do so.

Collection and Storage of Personal Information.

Holistic Home Care collects information:

  • directly from clients orally or in writing;
  • from third parties, such as medical practitioners, government agencies, client representatives, carer/s, and other health service providers;
  • from client referrals; and
  • from publicly available sources of information.

Holistic Home Care will collect sensitive information:

  • only with client consent, unless an exemption applies: e.g. the collection is required by law, court/tribunal order or is necessary to prevent or lessen a serious and imminent threat to life or health;
  • fairly, lawfully, and non-intrusively;
  • directly from client, if doing so is reasonable and practicable;
  • only where deemed necessary to support
  • service delivery to clients;
  • staff activities and functions; and
  • giving the client the option of interacting anonymity, if lawful and practicable.

Holistic Home Care takes all reasonable steps to protect personal information against loss, interference, misuse, unauthorised access, modification, or disclosure. Holistic Home Care will destroy, or permanently de-identify personal information that is

  • no longer needed;
  • unsolicited and could not have been obtained directly; or
  • not required to be retained by, or under, an Australian law or a court/tribunal order.

Holistic Home Care has appropriate security measures in place to protect stored electronic and hard-copy materials. Holistic Home Care has an archiving process for client files which ensures files are securely and confidentially stored and destroyed in due course.

Should a breach in privacy occur, potentially exposing client information (e.g. computer system hacked, laptop stolen etc.) the Director will immediately act to rectify the breach in accordance with organisational policy and processes.

 

Disclosing information

Holistic Home Care respects the right to privacy and confidentiality, and will not disclose personal information except:

  • where disclosure would protect the client and / or others;
  • where necessary for best service practice; or
  • where obligated by law.

For these purposes, Holistic Home Care may disclose clients’ personal information to other people, organisations or service providers, including:

  • medical and allied health service providers who assist with the services we provide to clients;
  • a ‘person responsible’ if the client is unable to give or communicate consent e.g. next of kin, carer, or guardian;
  • the client’s authorised representative/s e.g. legal adviser;
  • our professional advisers, e.g. lawyers, accountants, auditors;
  • government and regulatory authorities, e.g. Centrelink, government departments, and the Australian Taxation Office;
  • organisations undertaking research where information is relevant to public health or public safety; and
  • when required or authorised by law.

Accessing personal information

Clients can request and be granted access to their personal information, subject to exceptions allowed by law.

Requests to access personal information must state:

  • the information to be accessed
  • the preferred means of accessing the information,

and should be forwarded to the Director either verbally, or in writing to:

261/63 Old Cleveland Road, Stones Corner 4120 QLD

The Director will assess the request to access information, taking into consideration current issues that may exist with the client, and whether these issues relate to any lawful exceptions to granting access to personal information.

Should the Director decide that access to personal information will be denied, they must, within 30 days of receipt of the request, inform the client in writing of:

  • the reasons for denying access and
  • the mechanisms available to complain or appeal.

Should access be granted, the Director will contact the client within 30 days of receipt of the request to arrange access to their personal information.

Should Holistic Home Care be unable to provide the information in the means requested, the Director will discuss with the client alternative means of accessing their personal information.

Reasonable charges and fees, incurred by Holistic Home Care in providing the data as requested, may be passed on to the client.

 

Complaints

Questions or concerns about Holistic Home Care’s privacy practices should be brought, in the first instance, to the Director’s attention.

Clients may directly email the Director at asoni@holistichomecare.com.au

In investigating the complaint Holistic Home Care may, where necessary, contact the client making the complaint to obtain more information.

The client will be advised either in writing, or in a face to face meeting, of the outcomes and actions arising from the investigation.

If concerns cannot be resolved and clients wish to formally complain about how their personal information is managed, or if they believe Holistic Home Care has breached an APP and/or IPP, they may send their concerns in writing to:

Office of the Information Commissioner, Queensland

PO Box 10143
Adelaide Street Brisbane
Queensland 4000

Telephone: (07) 3234 7373
Email: enquiries@oic.qld.gov.au

Breaches of Privacy

  • Holistic Home Care are required to disclose a data breach to the Office of Australian Information Commissioner if the data contains personal information that is likely to result in “serious harm”, which includes any of the following: physical, psychological, financial or reputational harm. Personal information is information about an identified individual, or an individual who is reasonably identifiable.
  • Should a breach in privacy occur, potentially exposing client information (e.g. computer system hacked, laptop stolen etc.) the Director will immediately act to rectify the breach in accordance with organisational policy and processes.
  • Any staff who identify a potential breach must immediately inform their line manager, who must report to the Director for further action.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Updated to include breaches of privacy Director

 

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

 

SERVICE ACCESS AND EQUITY POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code CAP002.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 1,3

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure provides guidelines relating to access and equity.

This policy and procedure applies to the all potential and existing Holistic Home Care clients, their family members and carers, and other relevant stakeholders.

 

2.0 PRINCIPLES

  • Access – Holistic Home Care will provide services to everyone who is entitled to them, without discriminating on the basis of a person’s country of birth, language, culture, sexual identity or orientation or religion.
  • Equity – Holistic Home Care’s services will be developed and delivered to ensure fair treatment of all eligible clients.
  • Communication – Holistic Home Care will inform eligible clients of the services available, their entitlements, and how to obtain them. The organisation will regularly seek client feedback about the scope and standard of service provision.
  • Responsiveness – Holistic Home Care will be sensitive to clients from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds and, as far as practicable, respond to their particular circumstances and needs.
  • Effectiveness – Holistic Home Care will focus on meeting the needs of clients from all backgrounds.
  • Efficiency – Holistic Home Care will optimise the use of available public resources through a user-responsive approach to service delivery that meets the needs of clients.
  • Accountability – Holistic Home Care will ensure it is accountable for implementing access and equity objectives for clients.

3.0 POLICY

  • Holistic Home Care’s service delivery environment is safe and engaging, physically accessible and responsive to its clients’ support and communication needs.
  • Holistic Home Care’s screening and eligibility, priority of access and waitlist management is undertaken in a fair, equitable and transparent manner, and in line with the Client Rights and Responsibilities Policy and Procedure. Access to services is based on eligibility, relative need, organisational capacity, the best interests of people using the service and potential impact on existing clients.

4.0 PROCEDURE

Disability Service Access

Physical Accessibility

  • The Director will consider how the premises accommodates client’s accessibility needs, and possible modifications where reasonable.
  • Suggestions or complaints about the service’s accessibility will be directed to Holistic Home Care’s Feedback, Compliments and Complaints Policy and Procedure.

 

Accepting requests for service

  • Holistic Home Care will respond quickly and appropriately to each request for service.
  • Holistic Home Care’s process for receiving and assessing requests for a service is designed to be inclusive of our agreed target group and consistently applied.
  • To be eligible for a Holistic Home Care service, the person must be an NDIS participant or have been assessed as eligible to receive a Aged Care Home Care Package.
  • Consideration must be given to the person’s priority of access by examining:
  • the person’s need relative to other clients and potential clients;
  • where relevant, the needs of their family, carer or other supporters;
  • Holistic Home Care’s potential contribution to meeting those needs;
  • Holistic Home Care’s available resources to meet those needs;
  • how Holistic Home Care’s services will complement other services the person receives; and
  • the best interests of the person.
  • During an intake interview, the Director (or delegate) will assess any barriers to the person accessing services:
  • The Director (or delegates) will advise the person of their right to involve a support person in their dealings with Holistic Home Care.
  • The Director (or delegates) will provide information and support for the person to access a person of their choice, such as an advocate, to assist them to interact with the service (see Decision Making and Choice Policy and Procedure).
  • Where physical access issues are identified, the Director will consider whether Holistic Home Care is accessible for the person, and if not, how it could be made accessible.
  • Where a language or cultural barrier is identified, the Director (or delegates) will engage an interpreter or an appropriate external agency to support the person. See Service Delivery and Participation Policy and Procedure.
  • The Director (or delegates) will contact the person or their supporter within 1 working day of the Intake Interview to advise them of the outcome. Notification will be provided by phone and or email.
  • Where the client is offered services and accepts, see the Assessment, Planning and Review Policy and Procedure.
  • Comprehensive and clear records will be kept using the Client Intake Form, detailing: the name of the applicant, how they were referred, their eligibility, and any onward referrals made.
  • The Director (or delegates) will conduct all Intake Interviews. They will provide the person with information about:
  • entry and exit procedures;
  • eligibility and priority of access requirements;
  • conditions that may apply to service provision; and
  • The Director (or delegates) will provide the person with a Welcome Pack that outlines Holistic Home Care’s entry and exit procedures, fees, hours of operation, the Client Rights and Responsibilities statement, Privacy and Confidentiality Policy and Procedure and Feedback, Compliments and Complaints brochure.
  • Where appropriate, the Director (or delegate) will provide this information in an alternative format such as a different language, Easy English, detailed verbal explanation or through the use of interpreters and advocates.

 

Aged Care Access

  • The Director (or delegates) will track demand, as well as client and accessibility needs, by monitoring:
  • demographic data: relating to the local community and its needs from Local, State and Federal Government Sources, including ABS data and specific NDIS market data published by the NDIA;
  • unmet need: demographic data (as above), Holistic Home Care enquiry and waitlist data and feedback from staff, including those involved in local service networks; and
  • opportunities for innovation and improvement: through monthly review of Holistic Home Care’s Complaints Register and Continuous Improvement Plan and annual staff and client satisfaction surveys.
  • The Directors (or delegates) will manage service referrals from prospective clients or their supporters via the My Aged Care provider portal. The Directors (or delegates) will comply with the processes and timeframes aligned with the portal.
  • To be eligible to receive Holistic Home Care’s aged care services, a person must meet the following eligibility criteria. The person must have:
  • an Aged Care Assessment Service (ACAS) or Home Support assessment that has identified the need for Home Care at a specified level (this requirement may be waived where urgent care is required);
  • a Referral Code or a Referral for Service from My Aged Care (via letter or via the portal);
  • in some instances, a valid Initial Fee Notification Advice from the Department of Human Services.
  • Where Holistic Home Care’s receives a direct referral from someone other than My Aged Care, the Directors (or delegates) will refer this onto My Aged Care. The Directors (or delegate) can assist a person contact My Aged Care directly, where required.
  • Consideration must be given to the person’s Priority of Access by examining:
  • the person’s relative need compared to others who receive or want to receive Holistic Home Care’s services, including taking into account priority access for people from special needs groups;
  • any special additional needs of the person, and where relevant, their family, carer or other supporters;
  • Holistic Home Care’s service target group;
  • the extent to which Holistic Home Care can contribute to those needs being met;
  • the resources available within Holistic Home Care to meet the person’s needs;
  • other services the person receives and how Holistic Home Care’s services will complement those and contribute to improved outcomes for the person; and
  • the best interests of the person.
  • Where relevant, the interview will take into account information already provided about the person in their ACAS or Home Support assessment, and/or previous or existing Care Plan.

 

Waiting List processes

  • The Director (or delegates) will contact people on its Waiting List at least every three months to:
  • advise them of their current status;
  • check whether they want to remain on the list;
  • provide referrals to other service providers if required; and
  • advise the estimated wait time remaining.

 

Appeal

  • When a client is excluded from or is ineligible for a service with Holistic Home Care, the Director (or delegate) will advise them of their right of appeal and offer referral to more appropriate agencies, as per the Providing Information, Advice and Referrals Policy and Procedure.
  • Appeals should be directed in writing to Holistic Home Care’s Director and a final decision will be made by the Director (or Management Team where appropriate).
  • If required, staff will provide support for a person to make an appeal, by either transcribing their feedback for the Director’s (or delegate’s) review or referring the person to interpreter or advocacy services.
  • Those not successful in their appeal will be provided written advice to this effect.
  • If a person is unhappy with outcome of their appeal, they will be directed to Holistic Home Care’s complaints process. As per Holistic Home Care’s Feedback, Compliments and Complaints Policy and Procedure, information on the complaints process can be provided in a variety of formats if required including support to access interpreters or advocates if necessary.

 

Alternative supports

  • Holistic Home Care will work collaboratively with all people refused services and (with consent) their supporters, to identify what alternative services and referrals could best meet their needs.
  • With the client’s consent, relevant information will be provided by Holistic Home Care to new service providers to support the client’s seamless transition. Where appropriate, Holistic Home Care staff may also meet with staff of alternative providers to facilitate a smooth transition for the client.

 

Continuous improvement

  • Holistic Home Care will maintain a record of people who have been refused a service, summarising reasons for their being found ineligible or, if found eligible, reasons for being placed on Holistic Home Care’s Waiting List.
  • Access, service refusal and referral information will be tracked to inform Holistic Home Care’s continuous improvement.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS practise standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

ASSESSMENT, PLANNING AND REVIEW POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code SPP001.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 1,3

 

1.0       PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure sets out the approach to assessment, planning and review in respect to client support plans, once a person has been offered and accepted Holistic Home Care’s services.

This policy and procedure applies to the all potential and existing Holistic Home Care clients, their family members and carers, and other relevant stakeholders.

 

2.0       POLICY

  • This policy and procedure aligns with the planning requirements as set out in the Disability Services Act 2006 (Qld) and NDIS Act 2013 (Cwlth) of participation, choice and control, engaging as equal partners in decisions and including families, carers and other significant people.
  • Should a person request assistance with support planning that is beyond the scope of this policy and procedure, the person should be directed to a relevant support coordinator. Referral and support to connect the person to the relevant agency or service provider will be provided within a service benchmark of 5 working days.

 

3.0 PROCEDURE

  • Staff involved in assessment, planning and review activities have the relevant skills (or the capacity to acquire skills) in order to provide:
  • active engagement and early intervention strategies, including with families;
  • strength-based planning, assessment and review;
  • holistic and collaborative approaches to service delivery; and
  • capacity building of families and carers.
  • All documentation relating to assessment, planning and review will be maintained on client files.
  • During all assessments, planning and review activities, staff will discuss clients’ rights and responsibilities with them. They will confirm clients’ understanding verbally, using an interpreter or advocate where required.
  • Staff will advise the person of their right to involve a support person in their dealings with Holistic Home Care.
  • Where required, clients will be provided with information and support to access a person of their choice, such as an advocate, to assist them to access the service. See Decision Making and Choice Policy and Procedure.
  • In accordance with the Privacy and Confidentiality Policy and Procedure, respect for and protection of clients’ privacy and confidentiality will be reinforced on an ongoing basis, verbally and in literature promoting the services offered by the organisation.
  • If necessary and with the client or their supporter/s consent, other parties such as service providers who deliver existing or complementary services to clients will be included in assessment, planning and review activities.
  • Staff will take into account the client’s wishes in regards to accepting or rejecting particular support options.

 

Assessment and Planning

  • Following their Intake Interview, where a client is offered services and accepts, staff will work with the client and their supporter/s to assess their needs, develop and agree upon a Service Agreement.
  • Staff will meet with the client and their supporter/s as soon as practicable for an Assessment and Planning Interview.
  • Holistic Home Care will engage in joint assessment and planning activities where the NDIS, Local Area Coordinator, Support Coordinator or Plan Management provider in negotiating appropriate supports for the client. All activities undertaken with, or on behalf of, the client will documented in the client file.
  • The assessment will take into account:
  • the client’s needs (including health, wellbeing and safety needs), goals and longer-term aspirations;
  • the supports that Holistic Home Care can provide to meet those needs, goals and aspirations;
  • the client’s preferred links to family, friendships and other support networks;
  • the client’s and their supporters’ age, ability, gender, sexual identity, culture, religion or spirituality;
  • any barriers to community participation and strategies that could be put in place to help clients overcome them;
  • how, when, and where the client requires the supports to be delivered; and
  • the client’s NDIS Plan or ACAT/Home Care Assessment.
  • Where possible, services provided to clients should:
  • support them to develop, maintain and strengthen independence, problem solving, social and self-care skills appropriate to their age, developmental stage and cultural circumstances; and
  • help clients to take control of and responsibility for their choices and enhance their autonomy, independence and community participation.
  • Where required, staff will identify and provide referrals and linkages in accordance with the Information, Advice and Referrals Policy and Procedure to other services and activities that will enhance the client’s community participation and provide support and assistance to help them access these, including training, employment, health, wellness, cultural and community services.
  • Staff will work with the client and their supporter/s to formalise the supports to be provided in an NDIS Service Agreement or Home Care Agreement (where relevant).
  • Staff must ensure the client (and their supporter/s) understands their Service Agreement, or is supported to understand it, and provide the client a copy. A copy will also be kept on the client’s file.
  • The client must sign the Service Agreement before service delivery can commence.

 

Home Care Agreements (Home Care)

  • Home Care Agreements will include a Care Plan and an Individualised Budget, and will consider:
  • the client’s needs (including health, medical, wellbeing and safety needs), choices, decisions, preferences and wellness and reablement goals;
  • the client’s preferred links to family, friendships and other support networks;
  • the client’s decision-making supports (where relevant);
  • the client’s age, ability, gender, sexual identity, culture, religion; spirituality and any special needs in accordance with the Aged Care Act 1997;
  • any barriers to community participation and strategies that could be put in place to help clients overcome them;
  • the client’s eligibility for services, in accordance with their ACAT or Home Care Assessment;
  • any relevant risk assessments;
  • the client’s need for specialised assessment or referrals to other services;
  • the supports that will be provided by Holistic Home Care to support the client’s assessed care needs, including reference to the need for specialised equipment or resources;
  • the cost of those supports (including the cost of administering the package);
  • how, when, and where the client requires the supports to be delivered;
  • the period for when the client requires the supports to be provided;
  • the circumstances under which the type, duration or frequency of service delivery may be changed, refused, suspended or withdrawn;
  • an agreed procedure in the event that the client does not respond to a scheduled visit;
  • how the client and Holistic Home Care will deal with any problems or questions that arise, including complaint handling and dispute resolution;
  • what the client’s and their supporter’s responsibilities are under the Home Care Agreement;
  • what Holistic Home Care responsibilities are under the Home Care agreement;
  • the level of involvement and control the client will exercise over the management of their package;
  • case management arrangements, including how ongoing monitoring and informal reviews will be managed;
  • information about the client’s security of tenure;
  • what notice is needed for the client to change, suspend or leave the Home Care Agreement, how this is done and what the conditions and exit costs (if any) are when ceasing services;
  • what Holistic Home Care’s obligations are where a client chooses to move to another provider;
  • when and how the Home Care Agreement will be formally reassessed.
  • The planning process will take account of all relevant and available information, including, but not limited to, ACAT assessments, previous or existing Care Plans and specialised assessments undertaken by medical and health professionals. Where relevant, end of life planning, such as Advanced Care Directives will also be taken into account.

 

Review

  • Staff, with the relevant stakeholders, will review the provision of supports for each client every 6 months with the client and their supporter/s, or at any time where the client’s needs have changed. The client can also request a review at any time.
  • Reviews will include:
  • assessing changes to the client’s needs (including health, wellbeing and safety needs), goals and longer-term aspirations;
  • the client’s progress towards addressing their needs and achieving their goals;
  • recognition and celebration of the client’s progress;
  • any barriers to community participation and strategies to help clients overcome them;
  • whether a change to the supports provided is necessary.
  • Reviews will take into account the client’s NDIS Plan and incorporate any changes to the Plan where practicable.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS practise standards Director

 

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

SERVICE DELIVERY POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code SPP002.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 1,3

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

The purpose of this policy and procedure is to describe person-centred principles that guide the service delivery to clients of Holistic Home Care.

This policy and procedure applies to all potential and existing Holistic Home Care clients, their family members and carers, and other relevant stakeholders.

2.0 POLICY

  • All aspects of Holistic Home Care’s service delivery promote clients’ active participation in their community and support clients to develop and maintain independence, problem solving, social and self-care skills appropriate to their age, developmental stage and cultural circumstances.
  • Holistic Home Care promotes a person-centred approach to its service delivery whereby individuals lead and direct their services and are supported to maintain connections with their family, friends and communities.
  • Client assessment, planning, service delivery and review will include activities or supports that help clients to take control of and responsibility for their choices and enhance their autonomy, independence and community participation.
  • Holistic Home Care recognises the importance of carers, and respects the carer as an individual with his or her own needs; and that the carer has special knowledge of the person in his or her care.
  • Holistic Home Care is committed to the involvement of carers in the services provided to the client.
  • Holistic Home Care is committed to providing consumer-directed care, referred to throughout as person-centred care.

Service Delivery Principles

  • Holistic Home Care will put the client at the centre of decision-making in all aspects of their life and support clients to actively participate in their community and pursue their interests and goals.
  • Where required, staff will identify and provide referrals and linkages to services and activities that will enhance people’s community participation and provide support and assistance to help clients access these. See Holistic Home Care’s Providing Information, Advice and Referrals Policy and Procedure.
  • Where possible, Holistic Home Care services should support clients to develop and maintain independence, problem solving, social and self-care skills appropriate to their age, developmental stage and cultural circumstances.
  • Holistic Home Care will work collaboratively with disability-specific and mainstream services to provide holistic service delivery to its clients.
  • Holistic Home Care will use a strengths-based approach to identifying individual client needs and life goals, particularly in relation to recognising individuals’ capacity to develop their independence, problem solving, social and self-care skills.
  • Services will be delivered in a way that respects the client’s gender, sexuality, culture, religion and spiritual identity.
  • Holistic Home Care will provide services that support the client’s dignity of risk.
  • Staff will recognise that people can communicate their choices, likes and dislikes in many ways, including: verbal communication, withdrawal, acting out, engagement and disengagement, aggression, excitement, despondency and joyfulness.
  • Staff will work with clients and adapt to their individual needs as they change over time, regardless of the frequency or cause.
  • Holistic Home Care will take all practicable measures to ensure that carers are involved in service delivery to the client.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (A&TSI) and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) Specific Service Delivery Principles

  • Holistic Home Care is committed to supporting clients from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (A&TSI) and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) backgrounds to maintain and strengthen their connection to their community, their spiritual and language connections.
  • The Director will develop a culturally competent workforce and employ A&TSI and CALD staff where appropriate so that client assessments, planning, service delivery and reviews are undertaken in a culturally sensitive way.
  • Staff will identify and provide referrals and linkages to community services and activities operated by or for A&TSI and CALD people.
  • Holistic Home Care will work collaboratively with A&TSI and CALD services to provide holistic service delivery.
  • Holistic Home Care will use a strengths-based approach to identifying individual client needs and life goals, particularly in relation to recognising the importance of family, extended family, kinship and community ties and recognise the importance of people’s ties to their culture, spirituality and language.

Interpreters and Translation

  • Where appropriate or requested, Holistic Home Care will engage with interpreters and translation services to assist the client’s understanding of the service.

 

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS practise standards Director

 

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

 

 

PROVIDING INFORMATION, ADVICE AND REFERRAL POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code SPP003.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 1,3

PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure describes how Holistic Home Care provides information, advice and referrals to clients.

This policy and procedure applies to all potential and existing Holistic Home Care clients, their family members and carers, and other relevant stakeholders.

  • POLICY
  • Holistic Home Care operates proactively with other service providers to increase each person’s support options.
  • Where possible, people (including clients leaving the service or people unable to access Holistic Home Care’s services) will be referred using facilitated, warm or active referral processes.
  • PROCEDURE

Service Network Engagement

  • Holistic Home Care will build strong relationships with local government and non-government providers and agencies and participate in relevant local networks, to increase service and referral options for its clients and other stakeholders.
  • Holistic Home Care will build strong relationships with relevant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (A&TSI) and culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) services to support it to identify and meet clients’ needs and goals, as well as contribute to more coordinated service provision, better use of resources and improved outcomes for clients and communities. This includes active involvement with A&TSI and CALD communities and services, such as participation in community events, collaborative service provision and referrals.
  • The Director will collaborate with local A&TSI and CALD service providers to assist culturally sensitive service delivery, ensure staff are adequately trained and sensitive to the specific cultural needs of the service area (including in the development of referral practices) and generally facilitate participation of stakeholders from these backgrounds in the service and community.
  • Where applicable, Holistic Home Care will develop clear protocols with other service providers, such as memorandums of understanding or other forms of agreement, which in outline relationships and delineate the roles and responsibilities of collaborating agencies. The Director will be responsible for establishing, reviewing and modifying such agreements.
  • Staff will be encouraged to attend interagency meetings as a means of linking with other service providers and to inform them of client service and referral options.
  • The Director will retain records of service network involvement, such as meeting minutes and communications, in accordance with the Information Management Policy and Procedure, to inform continuous improvement.

Service Promotion

  • The Director (or delegates) will ensure Holistic Home Care is listed on relevant directories, including through the ‘Find Registered Service Providers’ tool on the NDIS website and distribute information about its services in appropriate formats to local agencies.

Referral and Information Sharing

  • The Director (or delegates) will maintain a comprehensive Referrals Database, which will be continuously reviewed and built upon by all delivery staff.
  • Holistic Home Care will work collaboratively with all people refused services or leaving Holistic Home Care, and their supporters, to identify alternative services and referrals that could best meet their needs.
  • Staff will provide referrals with empathy and respect for the person, a non-judgemental attitude and sensitivity to their needs.
  • Where required, people will be provided with information and support to access a person of their choice, such as an advocate, to assist them to interact with the Director (or delegates) and other services. See Decision Making and Choice Policy and Procedure.
  • Staff must be aware of possible barriers that a person may experience in using another service and, where feasible and appropriate, work with them to find ways to overcome these barriers.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS practise standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

MEDICATION MANAGEMENT POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code SPP004.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 4

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy outlines Holistic Home Care’s duty-of-care principles requiring staff to maintain a high level of competency when reminding clients about, supervising the intake of or administering medication.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, and any additional staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

2.0 POLICY

The health and safety of all Holistic Home Care staff, volunteers, contractors, clients and visitors are of utmost importance, including the management and administration of client medications.

3.0 PROCEDURE

Administering Medications

Clients self-administering and managing their own medications

  • Clients will manage and administer their own medication where appropriate.
  • Where required, the Director (or delegate) will request written advice from a client’s medical practitioner or guardian, notifying that a client has appropriate training and skill to assume responsibility for the management of their own medication.
  • Clients will be provided with every opportunity to safely manage and administer their own medication.
  • The self-administration and management of medications by the client is properly supervised, documented and recorded by Holistic Home Care staff.

 

Clients unable to self-administer their own medications

  • Staff members are to provide the client with whatever physical or other assistance is necessary and appropriate to enable the client to take their own medication, unless the client objects.
  • Staff who provide medication administration services will be provided with appropriate training.

Practical Requirements for the Administration of Medications

  • All medication must be administered in strict accordance with the directions of the prescribing medical practitioner or the manufacturer’s directions as appropriate and recorded on the appropriate medication chart.
  • All client medications are to be taken or administered from the original containers or packages in which they were originally dispensed.
  • Medication is not under any circumstances to be given out or administered to a client by another client.

 

Prohibited practices

  • Staff must not administer any medication that is not prescribed in accordance with this policy, including ‘over the counter’ medication.
  • Staff must not administer medication to a client who is clearly objecting in an informed manner, unless there is an approved protocol in place.
  • Staff must not administer medications to clients in a manner that is clearly for organisational convenience and not reflecting the preference or needs of the client.
  • Staff must not leave medications of any type in an area where they are unsupervised and accessible to clients or unauthorised persons.

Medication Records

  • A medication chart is to be maintained for each client prescribed medication. The chart is to be completed and updated whenever a medication is changed.
  • Where a staff member has uncertainty about a client’s medication, this should be immediately clarified with the client’s (and/or client representative) or the dispensing pharmacist.

Storage and Disposal of Medications

Storing Medication

  • Medication for all clients must be stored in a locked container (e.g. filing cabinet or cupboard), which can only be accessed by staff.
  • The Director (or delegate) is responsible for the security of all medication stored on Holistic Home Care’s premises.
  • Staff must adhere to the manufacturer’s instructions for storing each medication.
  • When medication needs to be transported, it should be placed in an appropriate storage container where required.

Disposing of Medications

  • All medications (including those self-administered and managed by clients) are to be returned to the pharmacist when ceased.
  • No ‘prescription only’ medication may be kept as Holistic Home Care’s stock. Any client’s medication is to be returned to the client at the end of the medication regime.
  • No medications are to be used by or for another client, or kept or allowed to accumulate with other client’s medication for use sometime later as ‘stock’ medication.

Reporting

  • Incidents relating to medication misuse should be reported in accordance with the Incident Management Policy and Procedure.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS practise standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

 

WORKING WITH CARERS AND FAMILY MEMBERS POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code SPP005.01
Person Responsible Proprietor
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Update 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 1,2,3

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

The purpose of this policy is to outline Holistic Home Care’s approach to the inclusion of carers and family members in the planning, delivery and review of services.

This policy applies to all potential and existing clients, their family members, carers and other supporters.

2.0 POLICY

  • Holistic Home Care aims to provide services that will have a continuing positive effect on clients. As such, Holistic Home Care recognises the importance of the role of significant people in the in the wellbeing and recovery of people with a mental illness or psychosocial disability, and in the client’s life overall. Holistic Home Care will implement processes identify family members/carers as soon as possible in all service episodes, and that maintain an ongoing relationship with family members/carers as partners in service delivery.
  • Clients will be invited to identify their family members / carers during their initial contact with Holistic Home Care, and Holistic Home Care processes will include family members/carers to the extent that the client wishes.
  • Holistic Home Care will maintain current information on services that support family members / carers, and provide them with education and training to support them to participate in services, such as in goal setting and recovery planning.
  • Holistic Home Care is also committed to ensuring its staff are appropriately trained and knowledgeable in ways in which to provide family member / carer support, including ensuring staff are trained in cultural competency, are aware of cross-organisational and community linkages, and can access resources and information for family members / carers.

3.0 PROCEDURE

Ways in which Holistic Home Care will support family members/carers can include (but is not limited to):

  • Family members/carers will be provided with and have access to information on respite services, counselling, crisis support, education, and training to maximise their wellbeing and ability to care and advocate for the client.
  • Identifying family members/carers as soon as possible and ensuring this is recorded in the client’s record.
  • Reviewing family member/carer information regularly throughout service delivery.
  • Providing training and support, if required, to family members / carers to maximise their participation in the service.
  • Ensuring that the needs of family members/carers who are children or aged persons are met, by maintaining knowledge of specialist support services/organisations that can assist them.
  • Engaging with family members/carers prior to the client exiting Holistic Home Care services to provide them with information on crisis management and services that can provide ongoing support to them.

If a client refuses or does not wish to nominate a family member / carer during the initial access process, Holistic Home Care will review this at each service review.

If a client does not wish to nominate a family member/carer at any point during their service, this will also be respected, and comply with the Mental Health Act 2014 and any other relevant legislation or requirements. Information, in this case, will only be provided to family members/carers:

  • if the client provides consent;
  • if the information is needed so that the family member / carer can provide care to the client;
  • the family member / carer needs to know the client has been made an involuntary patient; or
  • it is to prevent harm to the client or to another person.

If clients do not provide their consent for a carer to be involved/have knowledge of their service, Holistic Home Care should still engage with family members/carers. Carers may still have very high needs for support. In this case, family members/carers can still participate without breaching client confidentiality decision. Holistic Home Care can:

  • provide client information in general terms, and provide reassurance about the supports that monitor the client’s wellbeing;
  • provide the family member/carer the opportunity to present their issues / needs, and to consider these in the assessment, planning and support of the client;
  • provide opportunities for the family member/carer to be involved in Holistic Home Care at a service level;
  • provide support to assist them to access other services and advocacy.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS practise standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

SERVICE EXIT POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code CEP001.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2,3

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure describes the process for the exiting of client’s from Holistic Home Care’s service.

This policy and procedure applies to all potential and existing Holistic Home Care clients, their family members and carers, and other relevant stakeholders.

2.0 POLICY

  • Clients have the right to terminate their service provision and any time, and this decision will not prejudice future access to the service.
  • Holistic Home Care will collaborate with other services to enhance exit/transition planning to meet people’s needs where appropriate.
  • Exit procedures will be fair, transparent, follow due process, uphold the rights of clients and protect the safety and integrity of Holistic Home Care staff, clients, programs and services.

3.0 PROCEDURE

All clients shall be provided with appropriate:

  • Advice and support when exiting the service;
  • Referral to other services and links to the community (including those that will assist the client’s recovery and wellbeing);
  • Information relating to entering our services at a later date (this will also be provided to family members and other service providers involved in follow-up).
  • Prior to the client’s exit from Holistic Home Care, the Director (or delegate), with the client and family members/carers (if nominated by the client) will review the outcomes of the service and support, as well as inform the client of ongoing follow-up arrangements (if any).
  • All clients will be invited to complete a Client Exit Survey upon exiting the service and will be offered the opportunity to have an informal interview with the Director (or delegate).
  • With the consent of the client, carers and family members will be involved in exit planning and follow-up arrangements to ensure continuity of care.

 

Client Requested Termination

  • Clients have the right to terminate their service provision, and this decision will not prejudice future access to the service.
  • On cessation of service, the client will be sent a letter informing them of their rights to future service provision and information regarding advocacy services if required.
  • Holistic Home Care reserves to right to withhold an Exit Amount, in accordance with the client’s Home Care Agreement, relevant legislation and Home Care guidelines.
  • The Director is responsible for notifying the Department of Human Services of the client’s cessation within 31 days of the client ceasing service.
  • The Director is responsible for notifying the client (or their authorised representative) in writing of their unspent home care amount within 56 days of the client ceasing service.
  • The Director is responsible for making payment of the unspent home care amount in accordance with relevant legislation and Home Care guidelines.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS practise standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

CLIENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code CSP001.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 1,3

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

The purpose of this policy and procedure is to confirm Holistic Home Care’s commitment to clients’ rights.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, staff, students, contractors and volunteers and all potential and existing clients, their family members and other supporters.

2.0 POLICY

  • Holistic Home Care respects and fully commits to upholding the rights of all people, including those with disabilities.
  • Holistic Home Care is committed to ensuring its clients are made aware of their rights and responsibilities and supported to exercise them.
  • Holistic Home Care acknowledges that people with disability have the same human rights as other members of the community and that the community has a responsibility to facilitate the exercise of those rights.

3.0 PROCEDURE

Statement of Rights

Clients have the right to:

  • fair treatment – regardless of gender, religion, disability, cultural and linguistic background or age.
  • honesty, respect, dignity and a regard for privacy and individuality.
  • information and support to access services in the community.
  • to be an active partner in the services provided.
  • make informed decisions and choices about the services they receive.
  • a safe, secure and comfortable environment whilst using the service.
  • quality services, appropriate to their needs and age.
  • support that takes into account lifestyle and cultural differences
  • pursue a grievance about the service and to have that grievance resolved in a timely and appropriate manner.
  • have a support person/advocate/ally of their choice to represent them in matters relating to their support.

Statement of Responsibilities

Clients have a responsibility to:

  • respect other people’s rights to a safe, secure and comfortable environment.
  • treat other clients, staff and volunteers with fairness, honesty and respect.
  • respect other people’s rights to privacy and confidentiality.
  • follow the programs’ policies and procedures as they relate to clients and access to support.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS practise standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

PREVENTING AND RESPONDING TO ABUSE, NEGLECT AND EXPLOITATION POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code CSP002.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 1

 

PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure outlines Holistic Home Care’s immediate response requirements following verbal assault, bullying, discrimination or racism or an allegation of physical or sexual assault that involves a client.

The aims of the policy and procedure are to:

  • ensure timely and effective responses are taken to address immediate client safety and wellbeing;
  • support clients who have experienced physical or sexual assault;
  • be accountable to clients for actions taken immediately and planned in response to their experience of an assault;
  • ensure due diligence and responsibilities to clients are met; and
  • hold perpetrators of physical and sexual assault accountable for their actions.

This policy and procedure applies to staff, students, contractors and volunteers.

  • DEFINITIONS

 

Abuse (in the context of this policy) – Verbal, physical and/or emotional mistreatment and/or lack of care of a person. Examples include sexual abuse and any non-accidental injury.

Abuser – A person who mistreats and/or harms another person.

Bullying – Repeated verbal, physical, social or psychological behaviour that is harmful and involves the misuse of power by an individual or group towards one or more persons. Bullying occurs when one or more people deliberately and repeatedly upset or hurt another person, damage their property, reputation or social acceptance.

Child or Young Person – Under the Children, Youth and Families Act 2005 (Vic), a person under the age of 17 years.

Child abuse – An act or omission by an adult that endangers or impairs a child’s physical and/or emotional health and development. Child abuse can be a single incident but often takes place over time. Abuse, neglect and maltreatment are generic terms used to describe situations in which a child may need protection.

Physical abuse: When a child suffers or is likely to suffer significant harm from an injury inflicted by a parent/guardian, caregiver or other adult. The injury may be inflicted intentionally, or be the consequence of physical punishment or the physically aggressive treatment of a child. Physical injury and significant harm to a child can also result from neglect by a parent/guardian, caregiver or other adult. The injury may take the form of bruises, cuts, burns or fractures, poisoning, internal injuries, shaking injuries or strangulation.

Sexual abuse: When a person uses power or authority over a child, or inducements such as money or special attention, to involve the child in sexual activity. It includes a wide range of sexual behaviour from inappropriate touching/fondling of a child or exposing a child to pornography, to having sex with a child.

Emotional and psychological abuse: Involves continuing behaviour by adults towards children, which erodes social competence or self-esteem over time. It occurs when a person engages in inappropriate behaviours, such as rejecting, ignoring, threatening or verbally abusing a child, or allowing others to do so.

Racial, cultural and religious abuse: Conduct that demonstrates contempt, ridicule, hatred or negativity towards a child because of their race, culture or religion.

Neglect: Refer to definition below.

Exposure to domestic/family violence: When children and young people witness or experience the chronic, repeated domination, coercion, intimidation and victimisation of one person by another through physical, sexual and/or emotional means within intimate relationships[5].

Child sex offender – Someone who sexually abuses children, and who may or may not have prior convictions.

Child protection – The term used to describe the whole-of-community approach to the prevention of harm to children. It includes strategic action for early intervention, for the protection of those considered most vulnerable and for responses to all forms of abuse.

Code of conduct – A set of rules or practices that establish a standard of behaviour to be followed by individuals and organisations. A code of conduct defines how individuals should behave towards each other, and towards other organisations and individuals in the community.

Disclosure (in the context of this policy) – A statement that a child or person makes to another person that describes or reveals abuse.

Discrimination – treating a person less favourably than others in similar circumstances because of a personal attribute that has no relevance to the situation.

Age discrimination – Discrimination on the basis of age (regardless of age) or on the basis of age-specific characteristics or characteristics generally associated with a person of a particular age.

Disability discrimination – Discrimination on the basis of physical, intellectual, psychiatric, sensory, neurological or learning disability, physical disfigurement, disorder, illness or disease that affects thought processes, perception of reality, emotions or judgement, or results in disturbed behaviour, and presence in body of organisms causing or capable of causing disease or illness (eg, HIV virus).

Racial discrimination – Discrimination on the basis of race, colour, descent or national or ethnic origin and in some circumstances, immigrant status.

Sex discrimination – Discrimination on the basis of sex, marital or relationship status, pregnancy or potential pregnancy, breastfeeding, family responsibilities, sexual orientation, gender identity or intersex status.

Sexual harassment – any form of unwanted, unwelcome or uninvited sexual behaviour that is offensive, humiliating or embarrassing.

Domestic/family violence – The repeated use of violent, threatening, coercive or controlling behaviour by an individual against a family member(s) or someone with who they have or have had an intimate relationship, including carers.

Duty of care – A common law concept that refers to the responsibilities of organisations to provide people with an adequate level of protection against harm and all reasonable foreseeable risk of injury. In the context of this policy, duty of care refers to the responsibility Holistic Home Care has to provide its clients with an adequate level of care and protection against foreseeable harm and injury.

Maltreatment (in the context of this policy) – Physical and/or emotional mistreatment, and/or lack of care of a child or person. Examples include sexual abuse, the witnessing of family violence and any non-accidental injury.

Mandatory reporting – The legal obligation of certain professionals and community members to report when they believe, on reasonable grounds, that a child is in need of protection from harm. Under the Child Protection Act 1999 (Qld), the following people are mandated to report:

  • teachers,
  • doctors,
  • police officers with child protection responsibilities,
  • a person performing a child advocate function under the Public Guardian Act 2014, and
  • early childhood education and care professionals.

Neglect – The failure to provide a child with the basic necessities of life, such as food, clothing, shelter, medical attention or supervision, to the extent that the child’s health and development is, or is likely to be, significantly harmed.

Negligence – Doing, or failing to do something that a reasonable person would, or would not do in a certain situation, and which causes another person damage, injury or loss as a result.

Offender or Perpetrator – A person who mistreats and/or harms a child or person.

Reasonable grounds – A person may form a belief on reasonable grounds that another person is in need of protection after becoming aware that their health, safety or wellbeing is at risk and the client’s parents/guardians are unwilling or unable to protect them. There may be reasonable grounds for forming such a belief if:

  • a client states that they have been physically or sexually abused;
  • a client states that they know someone who has been physically or sexually abused (sometimes they may be referring to themselves);
  • someone who knows the client states they have been physically or sexually abused;
  • a client shows signs of being physically or sexually abused;
  • the person is aware of persistent family violence or parental substance misuse, psychiatric illness or intellectual disability that is impacting on the client’s safety, stability or development;
  • the person observes signs or indicators of abuse, including non-accidental or unexplained injury, persistent neglect, poor care or lack of appropriate supervision; or
  • a client’s actions or behaviour may place them at risk of significant harm and the parents/guardians are unwilling or unable to protect the child.

Reportable incidents – incidents, or alleged incidents, that must be reported to the NDIS Commission are those that:

  • arise from acts, omissions, events or circumstances occurring in connection with providing supports or services to a person with disability AND resulted in, or could have resulted in, harm to the person with disability; OR which
  • arise from acts by a person with disability that cause, or risk causing, serious harm to another per

Section 73Z(4) of the National Disability Insurance Scheme Act 2013 defines a reportable incident as:

  • the death of a person with disability
  • serious injury of a person with disability including fractures, burns, deep cuts, extensive bruising, concussion, and any other injury requiring hospitalisation.
  • abuse of a person with disability behaviour management including verbal, psychological and financial abuse
  • neglect of a person with disability behaviour management that is seriously inappropriate or improper
  • unlawful sexual or physical contact with, or assault of, a person with disability by a worker or another NDIS participant
  • sexual misconduct committed against, or in the presence of, a person with disability, including grooming of the person for sexual activity
  • unauthorised use of a restrictive practice in relation to a person with disability.

For further examples, consult the NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission Reportable Incidents Guidance.

Voluntary (non-mandated) notification – A notification to the department by a person who believes that another person is in need of protection, where the notification is made out of moral obligation, rather than legislative obligation. The person making the notification is not expected to prove the abuse, and the law protects the anonymity of the person making the notification.

  • POLICY
  • Holistic Home Care is proactive in preventing the occurrence of abuse and neglect in its services and to its clients. This includes supporting the safety and security of people affected by family violence.
  • Physical and sexual assault are crimes against the person. Staff should be aware that many clients, including children, young people and people with a disability, are at greater risk of physical and sexual assault than the general population.
  • Holistic Home Care has a moral, ethical and legal responsibility to ensure that all clients are safe in their care, and will provide training, resources, information and guidance to support this. Holistic Home Care is committed to:
  • ensuring that the health, safety and wellbeing of clients at the service is protected at all times;
  • fulfilling its duty of care obligations under the law by protecting clients from any reasonable, foreseeable risk of injury or harm;
  • ensuring that all staff, students and volunteers caring for clients at the service act in the best interests of the client and take all reasonable steps to ensure the client’s safety and wellbeing at all times;
  • supporting the rights of all clients to feel safe, and be safe, at all times;
  • developing and maintaining a culture in which clients feel valued, respected and cared for;
  • encouraging active participation from parents/guardians and families at the service, and ensuring that best practice is based on a partnership approach with shared responsibility for clients’ health, safety, wellbeing and development; and
  • educating clients of their individual rights by including personal safety education programs within Holistic Home Care.
  • PROCEDURE

Prevention of abuse, neglect and exploitation

Holistic Home Care will:

  • ensure that all staff are aware of, trained in, compliant with, and implement this policy;
  • ensure the cultural needs of clients from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds are safeguarded through training in cultural competency;
  • ensure that staff are trained to recognise and prevent/minimise the occurrence or recurrence of abuse, neglect and exploitation of clients within a service delivery context;
  • support staff to create an appropriate service culture in accordance with this policy and vision and values of the organisation.

 

Identification of Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation

Holistic Home Care will:

  • ensure there are systems in place to identify and remedy gaps which contributed to a client experiencing abuse, neglect or exploitation;
  • ensure staff are trained in early intervention approaches where potential or actual abuse, neglect and exploitation of clients is identified.

 

Responding to abuse, neglect and exploitation

Holistic Home Care will ensure:

  • that there is a culture of no retribution for any person who reports abuse, neglect or exploitation of a person with a mental illness and/or disability;
  • that staff advise clients, their families and advocates about:
  • support services, which are equipped to identify abuse, neglect and exploitation and able to refer individuals to appropriate specialist services; and
  • their right to pursue grievances and complaints and access to the criminal justice system.

The Director will ensure:

  • that any concerned person, including but not limited to, the person receiving services, another client, relative, friend or person from the community is able to make a report or an allegation of abuse, neglect and exploitation, without fear of retaliation or retribution;
  • that all Holistic Home Care staff supporting clients are respectful of their rights and needs; and
  • the requirement – to report the abuse, neglect or exploitation of clients to the relevant authority in line with the requirements of the Incident Reporting and Investigation Guideline – is implemented.

Holistic Home Care staff will:

  • support the creation a culture of no retribution for reporting of suspected abuse, neglect or exploitation;
  • support other staff to create an appropriate service culture in accordance with this policy;
  • provide services to clients in a manner consistent with this policy;
  • report all alleged or suspected instances of abuse, neglect and exploitation in accordance with this policy, as well as the Incident Reporting Policy and Procedure;
  • cooperate with the investigation of any complaint or grievance relating to the provision of Holistic Home Care services; and
  • provide appropriate support to the person making the report.

Where a staff member is the alleged perpetrator

  • After reporting to the Police, the Director must be immediately notified of the report.
  • Depending on the nature of the allegation, the Director’s response regarding the alleged perpetrator should comply with Holistic Home Care’s Human Resources Policy and Procedure. Responses include redirecting the staff member to alternate duties that do not involve direct client care, or standing the staff member down.
  • The incident should be reported to the NDIS Commission where an NDIS participant is the alleged victim.

Where a client is the alleged perpetrator

  • Staff must consult with Police about whether to inform the client of the report to Police. The police may want to interview the client and take a statement. Clients with a cognitive disability must have an independent third person present during the interview, and this will be arranged by police. Where the client is under the age of eighteen years, an independent person must be present during the police interview.
  • Staff must contact the service most directly responsible for the client’s care who will ensure that the client has legal representation and is assisted during the investigation and hearing.
  • Under no circumstances should anyone but the Police interview the client about the allegation. It is acknowledged however that some discussion with the client may be required to establish safety and a basic understanding of what has occurred.
  • The incident should be reported to the NDIS Commission where an NDIS participant is the alleged perpetrator.

 

Where a staff member is the alleged victim

  • Allegations or assaults where a Holistic Home Care staff member is the alleged victim should be dealt with in accordance with Holistic Home Care’s Incident Management Policy and Procedure.

 

External Reporting

Level One Incidents

  • Level One incidents are very serious incidents, with a significant risk of or actual harm or death, injury, loss or damage; and an immediate and/or major consequence for the person/s involved or the provision of service.
  • Level One incidents require:
    • immediate verbal notification to the Regional Director, Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services;
    • a critical incident report form submitted within four business hours of the staff member becoming aware of the incident.
  • Level One incidents include:
  • Death of a person with a disability
    • who was a child or young person known to Child Safety in the previous 12 months; or
    • which is defined as a ‘death in care’ under the Coroners Act 2003 (Qld); or
    • where another client, foster or kinship carer, or staff member is involved in the death; or
    • while attending or using the service.
    • Life threatening injuries
    • Hospitalisation, due to injury, of a child or young person known to Child Safety – currently or within the previous twelve months
    • Abduction;
    • Physical assault or injury requiring hospitalisation, emergency medical treatment or ambulance attendance;
    • Alleged rape, sexual assault or serious assault of a child under 14 years.
  • Level one client incident reports must be sent to the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disabilities designated divisional office within 4 business hours of Holistic Home Care becoming aware of the incident verbal advice provided immediately to the Regional Director.

 

Level Two Incidents

  • Level Two incidents involve events that threaten the health, safety and/or wellbeing of clients or staff, but do not have an immediate or major consequence for clients, staff and or the public, including, but not limited to:
    • Serious injury to a person that results in hospitalisation
    • Alleged rape, sexual assault or serious assault
    • Attempted suicide
    • Missing Child
    • Missing person, where there are serious concerns for their safety or wellbeing due to their vulnerability
    • Alleged abuse, neglect or exploitation of a person with a disability.
  • Level two critical client incident reports must be sent to the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disabilities designated divisional office by 5pm the next business day of notification of the incident of Holistic Home Care becoming aware of the incident and verbal advice provided immediately to the Regional Director.
  • The person with management or control of the workplace must ensure, so far as reasonably practicable, that the site where the incident occurred is not disturbed until either Workplace Health and Safety Queensland or the Director advise that the area is no longer required to be preserved.
  • The Director will track progress and outcomes of accidents, incidents and near misses in the Incident Register and refer any relevant items for inclusion in the Continuous Improvement Plan.
  • Accidents, incidents and near misses are to be reported to the Management Team monthly by the Director as part of their WHS reporting, where a management team is in place.

 

 

 

 

Notification of next of kin or guardian – all clients

  • If the alleged perpetrator is the client’s next of kin or legal guardian, the staff member must ensure that the immediate needs of the client and an appropriate planned response are undertaken.
  • The Director must notify the client’s next of kin or guardian where:
  • the client is under 18 years old;
  • the client is over 18 years old and consents to their next of kin or guardian being contacted. If the client is unable to make an informed decision regarding contact and the client does not have an appointed guardian, the Director should contact the next of kin as appropriate;
  • the client has a legal guardian; or
  • the client is on a guardianship to Secretary order.
  • The Director must explain to the next of kin or guardian: the nature of the allegation; the standard procedure for reporting allegations to the Police; that the client may choose whether or not to participate in the Police investigation; and any action taken by staff since reporting the allegation.
  • If the client is a child or young person who does not wish their next of kin or guardian to be notified, a decision in relation to notification will need to consider factors including the client’s age and capacity, where they are living and their best interests. If necessary, legal advice should be sought, and if a decision is taken not to notify the next of kin or guardian, this must be clearly documented and placed on the client’s file.

Reporting Incidents: NDIS Commission

  • Reportable Incidents – including alleged incidents – must be reported to the NDIS Commissioner
  • The Director is responsible for reporting all Reportable Incidents unless the role is otherwise delegated.
  • Details of incidents must be kept confidential where possible.
  • If a person with disability discloses an incident that occurred in the past, it should generally be treated in the same way as any other reportable incident, noting that the immediate response may differ.
  • The reporting officer must provide the following information to the NDIS Commission where it can be collected:
  • the name and contact details of:
  • the registered NDIS provider,
  • the person making the notification;
  • the name and contact details of the persons involved in the incident (alleged victim and alleged offender);
  • a description of the reportable incident, including:
  • the nature of any injuries sustained, and details such as time, date and place it allegedly occurred,
  • a description of the impact on, or harm caused to, the person with disability (Note: where the reportable incident is a death this does not need to be provided),
  • the immediate actions taken by the provider in response to the reportable incident including any actions relating to the health, safety and wellbeing of the participant, involved in the incident including medical treatment provided, or whether the incident has been reported to the police or any other body.

Forms and Timeframes

  • Unauthorised use restrictive practices must be reported to the NDIS Commission within 5 business day

Forms are available at  https://www.ndiscommission.gov.au/document/656

  • All other Reportable Incidents must be reported immediately (within 24 hours of key personnel becoming aware of the incident)

Forms are available at  https://www.ndiscommission.gov.au/document/661

Working with Police

  • A police investigation takes priority over a reportable incident investigation.
  • Clearance must be obtained from police before taking any action that might compromise the investigat Holistic Home Care must manage any ongoing risk and maintain an open dialogue with police about any investigation they are conducting.
  • Holistic Home Care will inform  the  NDIS  Commission  where  a  Police  investigation  delays conducting a required investigation and finalising a report.

Investigating Reportable Incidents

  • Holistic Home Care will investigate and respond to all Reportable Incidents. The nature of any investigation or actions following an incident will be proportionate to the harm caused and any risk of future harm to people with disability.
  • If the NDIS Commission requires a Reportable Incident to be investigated, either internally or by an external independent investigator, Holistic Home Care will fully comply with the Commission’s request
  • Where an incident relates to potential staff-to-client abuse or poor quality of care, some degree of independence is required for the investig Depending on the nature of the incident and the organisation, one of the following may be appropriate to conduct the investigation:
  • an area of the organisation that is sufficiently independent from staff who are the subject of any allegations, such as another division or an independent investigative function
  • another service provider independent from the staff who are the subject of any allegations
  • an external investigative body.
  • An investigation must:
  • be in proportion to the nature and significance of the incident and any associated allegations;
  • include the identification of any previous relevant allegations that should be considered regarding the relevant individuals;
  • include a degree of independence appropriate to the seriousness of the incident;
  • adopt a person-centred and rights-centred approach, taking into account what is important to the client;
  • abide by the standard principles of good investigations:
  • procedural fairness
  • confidentiality and privacy
  • appropriate interview techniques
  • evidence based
  • properly documented
  • result in an investigation report
  • Internal and external investigators must be appropriately trained in conducting serious workplace investigations, including investigating serious incidents that may involve a criminal eleme
  • The Director (or delegated investigator) will appropriately assess and/or investigate all incidents having regard to the views of any person with disability impacted by an incident and including the following:
  • whether the incident could have been prevented;
  • how well the incident was managed and resolved;
  • what, if any, remedial action needs to be undertaken to prevent further similar incidents from occurring, or to minimise their impact;
  • whether other persons or bodies need to be notified of the incident.

Investigation Reports

  • If required, Holistic Home Care will supply details to the NDIS Commission in connection with any internal or external investigation or assessment that has been undertaken in relation to the reportable incident, including:
  • the name and position of the person who undertook the investigation;
  • when the investigation was undertaken;
  • details of any findings made;
  • details of any corrective or other action taken after the investigation;
  • a copy of any report relating to the investigation;
  • information about whether persons with disability impacted by the incident (or their representative) have been kept informed of the progress, findings and actions relating to the investigation or assessment;
  • any other information required by the NDIS Comm
  • The details outlined above should be included in the final report to the NDIS Commission which must be provided within 60 business days following the initial notif The NDIS Commission may extend the period for providing the final report – for example, if there is a concurrent police investigation the reportable incident investigation will be justifiably delayed.
  • The notification must be made in writing, by completing a form approved by the NDIS Commission and returning it to the NDIS Commission via em

Corrective and Restorative Action

  • Clients affected by incidents will be provided information about how the incident has been managed and the measures taken to ensure against recurrence.
  • All investigations should determine whether corrective and/or restorative measures are requir The NDIS Commission may require Holistic Home Care to take corrective and/or measures. The NDIS Commission may work with Holistic Home Care to implement the measures, and monitor progress.
  • Restorative measures may include, but are not limited to:
  • providing ongoing support to people with disability impacted by a reportable incident
  • giving an apology
  • providing compensation – for example, through an enforceable undertakin
  • Corrective measures may include, but are not limited to:
  • disciplinary action
  • training or education of workers
  • modification of the environment
  • development or amendment of a policy or procedure
  • changes to the way in which supports or services are provided
  • other practice improvement

 

Ongoing support

  • Irrespective of gender, victims of sexual assault frequently experience negative outcomes including dissociation, posttraumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety. Victims of physical assault also frequently experience shock, numbness, fear, depression and anxiety. In recognition of this, after an allegation of abuse, additional support and/or a review of supports provided to the client may be required.
  • A quality of support review must also be undertaken by the Director for clients who are victims or alleged perpetrators of an assault. Agreed actions for the client’s immediate and ongoing needs must be recorded on the client’s care plan. This must include:
  • steps being taken to assure the client’s safety and wellbeing in the future
  • treatment or counselling the client may access to address their safety and wellbeing
  • modifications in the way services are provided (for example, same gender care or placement)
  • how best to support the client through any action the client takes to seek justice or redress including making a report to Police
  • any ongoing risk management strategy required where this is deemed appropriate.

Record Keeping

Incidents and Allegations

  • Records of all reportable incidents that occur or are alleged to have occurred must be kept for a period of seven years from the date of notifying the NDIS Comm
  • Holistic Home Care will retain:
    • completed reportable incident notification forms
    • records of investigations, including:
    • records of interviews,
    • evidence collected,
    • any relevant correspondence,
    • investigation reports and outcomes.
  • Incidents involving clients under 18 years old should be kept until the client turns (or would have turned) 25 years
  • The Director (or delegate) will be responsible for creating and maintaining incident records.
  • Records must be stored securely and only accessed by people with a legitimate reason for doing so. Confidentiality surrounding any allegations of abuse, deficits in care and subsequent investigations must be maintained in accordance with the Privacy (Private Sector) Amendment Act 2000 (Cwth).

 

 

 

Incident Management Flowchart

 

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

DECISION MAKING AND CHOICE POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code CSP003.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 1,3

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy describes the process for ensuring clients are involved and participate as fully as possible in the decisions about the support they receive.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, staff, students, contractors and volunteers and all potential and existing clients, their family members and other supporters.

2.0 POLICY

  • Holistic Home Care is committed to ensuring all clients are involved in making decisions and choices about all aspects of the support services they receive from the organisation.
  • Clients should be the person making informed decisions and choices with regard to themselves and the services they receive.
  • All people have the right to maintain their personal, gender, sexual, cultural, religious and spiritual identities, and the right to dignity of risk.

3.0 PROCEDURE

  • The Director (or delegate) will advise clients/parents/guardians when making appointments for an Intake Interview and subsequent reviews that they are entitled to have an independent support person at the meeting to assist them in the decision making process.
  • The Director (or delegate) will support clients/parents/carers to access any information they reasonably require to enable them to participate in decisions affecting clients’ lives. This includes supporting their access to technology, aids, equipment and services that increase and enhance their decision-making and independence.
  • The Director (or delegate) will be responsive to the changing needs, goals, aspirations and choices of clients and will communicate in appropriate formats to facilitate their informed decision-making and choice.
  • Where Holistic Home Care is unable to meet the needs and goals of a client or is not resourced to effectively meet the person’s needs, the Director (or delegate) will refer the person to other relevant service providers or community-based organisations to facilitate their support needs.
  • The Director (or delegate) will act upon the outcomes of a client/parent/guardian’s input into decision- making.
  • Information about clients’ rights, services and processes that impact them will be provided in a variety of formats where practicable to assist understanding, in order to support decision-making and choice.

 

Dignity of Risk

  • Where a client has the capacity for decision making, all options, risks and possible consequences must be discussed with them and all relevant stakeholders involved in the decision making process.
  • If a decision doesn’t place anyone at risk of harm, staff are to comply with the decision.
  • Staff will support clients’ access to information on which to base their decisions when they want to try new things or continue with options that may not have gone well in the past, including the benefits and risks, consequences and responsibilities to them and others.
  • All staff will be trained in responding to the needs of clients, client decision making, dignity of risk and assisting clients to make informed choices in the least restrictive way, through formal induction and training processes as well as regular team meetings.

 

Provision of Information

  • Advice, notice or information will be offered in the language, mode of communication and terms that the client is most likely to understand. Where possible, explanation should be given both verbally and in writing.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS practise standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

FEEDBACK, COMPLIMENTS AND COMPLAINTS POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code CFP001.01
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure sets out how any person can provide feedback and make complaints about any aspect of Holistic Home Care’s operations and the process of addressing or responding to feedback and complaints.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, staff, students, contractors and volunteers and all potential and existing clients, their family members and other supporters. The policy also applies to other service providers, government agencies and members of the community.

2.0 DEFINITIONS

Compliment – an expression of praise, encouragement or gratitude about an individual staff member, a team or a service.

Complaint – an expression of dissatisfaction made to or about an organisation, related to its products, services, staff or the handling of a complaint, where a response or resolution is explicitly or implicitly expected.[6]

For the purpose of this policy and procedure, a complaint is defined as an issue of a minor nature that can be resolved promptly or within 24 hours, and does not require a detailed investigation. Complaints include an expression of displeasure, such as poor service, and any verbal or written complaint directly related to the service (including general and notifiable complaints).

General complaint – addresses any aspect of the service e.g. a lost clothing item or the service’s fees. The complaint must be dealt with as soon as is practicable to avoid escalation of the issue.

Grievance – a formal statement of complaint that cannot be addressed immediately and involves matters of a more serious nature e.g. the service is in breach of a policy or the service did not meet the care expectations of a family.

 

3.0 POLICY

Compliments, complaints and other feedback provide:

  • valuable information about client satisfaction; and
  • an opportunity to improve upon all aspects of its service.
  • Holistic Home Care records and handles feedback effectively in order to:

identify areas for improvement;

  • coordinate a consistent approach to complaint resolution;
  • reduce the potential for future complaints; and
  • allow for reporting and efficient allocation of resources.

Holistic Home Care’s feedback, compliment and complaint handling system addresses the principles of:

  • visibility and accessibility;
  • responsiveness;
  • assessment and investigation;
  • feedback;
  • continuous improvement; and
  • service excellence.

Holistic Home Care seeks to build a responsive, efficient, effective and fair complaint management system. Resolving complaints at the earliest opportunity in a way that respects and values the person’s feedback can:

  • aid in recovering the person’s confidence about Holistic Home Care’s services;
  • help prevent further escalation of the complaint.

Holistic Home Care’s approach to feedback, compliments and complaints management ensures:

  • people understand their rights and responsibilities;
  • information on the feedback, compliment and complaint management process is easily accessible;
  • increased satisfaction of clients in the management of their compliments and complaints;
  • the recording of data to identify existing or emerging trends or systemic issues;
  • staff demonstrate an awareness of Holistic Home Care’s feedback, compliments and complaints management processes;
  • staff develop the range of skills and capabilities required to manage compliments, complaints and feedback; and
  • an organisational culture that is focused on effective, person-centred complaints resolution and utilising feedback for continuous improvement.

 

4.0 PROCEDURE

Overview

  • Holistic Home Care will promote best practice, continuous improvement and an open, supportive, respectful culture that encourages and supports staff, clients and other stakeholders to make complaints and report concerns without fear of retribution.
  • Holistic Home Care’s Client Charter, Welcome Pack and a Feedback, Compliments and Complaints Brochure provide clients, their families and carers and all other stakeholders with information about this policy and procedure, in an easy to understand format. This will include information on how feedback and complaints will be addressed and who to contact to provide feedback and complaints to external agencies, including external advocacy and support agencies. Information will be clearly displayed in Holistic Home Care and provided by staff when requested.
  • Information about providing feedback and making complaints will be provided in a variety of formats where appropriate, including in Easy English and alternative languages. Interpreters and referrals to advocates can be provided.
  • Holistic Home Care will provide all clients, their families and carers with this policy and procedure when they first access the service and, throughout service delivery, remind them of the policy and their right to make a complaint without fear of affecting their service.
  • All personal information Holistic Home Care collects to manage feedback or complaints will be handled in accordance with privacy legislation and the Privacy and Confidentiality Policy and Procedure. Feedback and complaints will be dealt with in a confidential manner and will only be discussed with the people directly involved. All information regarding feedback and complaints will be kept securely in accordance with the Records and Information Management Policy and Procedure.
  • Complaints and feedback can be lodged by a third party on behalf of another person, if their consent has been provided.
  • The Director will track and analyse feedback and complaint data to identify any ongoing issues and opportunities for service improvement.

 

Feedback

  • Provision of feedback to Holistic Home Care is voluntary.
  • Feedback will be collected regularly:
    • after each major interaction with the service (e.g. initial assessment and planning; reviews; exit);
    • during client service delivery;
    • at client forums; and
    • through satisfaction surveys.
  • Stakeholders can provide feedback at any time through:
  • Feedback and Complaint Forms;
  • phone: 1300 942 008
  • email: coordinator@holistichomecare.com.au
  • post: 261/63 Old Cleveland Road, Stones Corner 4120 QLD
  • Where feedback is provided verbally, the receiving staff member will transcribe the feedback onto a Holistic Home Care Feedback and Complaint Form.

Complaints Management Process

  • Holistic Home Care’s complaints management process can be simplified into five steps:
  • Receive;
  • Record;
  • Acknowledge;
  • Resolve; and
  • Communicate resolution.
  1. Receive
  • To lodge a complaint, individuals are encouraged to speak directly to a staff member first, in an attempt to resolve the matter without recourse to the complaints and grievances procedures.
  • Staff will:
  • Listen – openly to the concerns being raised by the complainant.
  • Ask – the complainant what outcome they are seeking.
  • Inform – the complainant clearly of the complaint process, the time the process takes and set realistic expectations.
  • Be accountable – and empathic towards the affected person and action all commitments made.
  • Assess – situations that pose an immediate threat or danger, or require a specialised response.
  • All complaints and grievances will be referred to the relevant supervisor (or Director) for resolution.
  • The relevant supervisor will discuss minor complaints directly with the party involved as a first step towards resolution.
  • If the complaint cannot be resolved promptly or within 24 hours, the Director will treat it as a grievance (advising the individual of their right to lodge a grievance if they have not already done so, with the assistance of a support person or advocate if they wish).
  • A Feedback and Complaints Form will be made available to the individual to lodge their grievance, however it is not mandatory that they use the form. The Feedback and Complaints Form can be used to make anonymous complaints.
  • Grievances can be lodged:
  • directly with a staff member, either verbally or by providing a completed Feedback and Complaints Form;
  • phone: 1300 942 008
  • email: coordinator@holistichomecare.com.au
  • post: 261/63 Old Cleveland Road, Stones Corner 4120 QLD
  • Complaints can be lodged directly with the Queensland Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services Complaints Unit or the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA).
  • All clients making a complaint will be encouraged to use an advocate of their choice to act on their behalf if they wish. The advocate may be a family member or friend, or sourced (with the assistance of a staff member if required) through the National Disability Advocacy Program.
  • If a complaint alleges actual or possible criminal activity or abuse or neglect, it will be referred to the Director immediately. The Director will follow the Incident Management Policy and Procedure, reporting the complaint and working with the relevant authority to investigate the allegation.
  • Staff will take all reasonable steps to ensure a complainant is not adversely affected because a complaint has been made by them or on their behalf.
  1. Record
  • The Director will:
  • Record – all information that is relevant to the compliment or complaint, in its original and simplest form, in Holistic Home Care’s Complaints and Grievances Register.
  • Store and protect – the Complaints and Grievances Register in a secure file, accessible only to the Management Team.
  1. Acknowledge
  • The Director will:
  • Acknowledge – receipt of the grievance within 2 working days to build a relationship of trust and confidence with the person who raised the complaint.
  • Provide anonymity – a person may request to remain anonymous in their lodgement and therefore contact may not be possible or expected.
  • Seek desired outcomes – provide realistic expectations and refer the matter to other organisations where identified as being more suitable to handle.
  • Avoid conflict of interest – by appointing a person unrelated to the matter as an investigator if necessary.
  • Provide timeframes and expectations – to the complainant where possible.
  1. Resolve
  • In resolving a complaint or grievance, the Director will:
  • Involve the complainant – keep them informed of the progress of the complaint and discuss any disparities identified in the information held;
  • Request additional information – when required but apply a timeframe that limits when it is to be provided by;
  • Consider extensions – only where necessary and always communicate any additional time requirements to the complainant with an explanation of the need;
  • Record all decisions or actions of the complaint investigation in Holistic Home Care’s Complaints Register; and
  • Focus on the identified complaint matters only. A complaint is not an opportunity to review a whole case.
  • Investigation of complaints will not be conducted by a person about whom a complaint has been made. If required, the Management Team will determine the appropriate person to undertake the investigation.
  1. Communicate resolution
  • Holistic Home Care will respond to all complaints and grievances as soon as possible and within 28 days from acknowledgement.
  • If a complaint or grievance cannot be responded to in full within 28 days of acknowledgement, an update will be issued to the complainant. The update will provide the date by which a full response can be expected. The update should be provided verbally in the first instance then confirmed in writing.
  • The Director (or delegate) will:
  • Discuss the outcome – where possible, verbally with the complainant before providing written advice and allowing them the opportunity to make further contact following receipt of the written advice.
  • Include information on recourse – further action available to the complainant at the conclusion of the complaint investigation. An action of recourse may be to escalate the matter further with an external agency or for a further review within the organisation.
  • Provide a further review – to enable the first investigation to be reviewed for soundness and allow additional information not available in the first complaint to be included.
  • Identify opportunities – relay complaint outcomes to the appropriate area within the organisation for action to improve service delivery.
  • Seek Feedback – from the complainant regarding their experience of the complaints process.
  • Support will be provided to assist complainants understand correspondence regarding complaints and grievances where required (e.g. interpreters, referral to advocates, etc.).
  • Options for actions responding to a complaint include but are not limited to:
  • explaining processes;
  • rectifying an issue;
  • providing an apology;
  • ongoing monitoring of issues; and
  • training or education of staff.
  • Holistic Home Care’s Complaints and Grievances Register will be used by Holistic Home Care’s Director (or delegate) to record every complaint, track investigation progress and outcomes and how the outcomes have been communicated to stakeholders.

Procedural Fairness

  • Procedural fairness:
      • is impartial;
      • requires a response proportionate to the complaint, accusation and likely remedial action;
      • ensures that a complainant or participant is not disadvantaged by the complaint or the process of resolving a complaint;
      • ensures that persons who are likely to be adversely affected by a complaint process are given the opportunity to present their views and have them heard.
  • Procedural fairness must be afforded to a person if their rights or interests may be adversely or detrimentally affected in a direct and specific way. In those circumstances:
      • the person must be given notice of each prejudicial matter that may be considered against them;
      • the person must be given a reasonable opportunity to be heard on those matters before adverse action is taken, and to put forward information and submissions in support of an outcome that is favourable to their interests;
      • the decision to take adverse action should be soundly based on the facts and issues that were raised during that process, and this should be apparent in the record of the decision, and
      • the decision maker should be unbiased and maintain an unbiased appearance.
  • The precise requirements of procedural fairness can vary from one situation to another. The required steps can vary according to:
      • the nature of the matter being dealt with;
      • the options for resolving it;
      • the time-frame for resolution;
      • whether facts in issue are in dispute;
      • the gravity of possible findings that may be reached; and
      • the sanctions that could be imposed based on those findings.

 

NDIS: Complaints Escalation and Dispute Resolution

  • If a complainant remains dissatisfied with the outcome of their complaint or grievance they will be provided with the details of other agencies they can use to assist them to achieve a resolution.
  • Escalated complaints will be tracked in the Complaints and Grievances Register in the same manner as other complaints and the same communication processes as outlined above will be applied.
  • NDIS participants purchasing products and services also have rights and protections under the Australian Consumer Law (ACL), including provisions on client guarantees and unfair contract terms. Consumer Affairs Queensland provides information and advice and, in some cases, dispute resolution services for client disputes under the ACL. See https://www.qld.gov.au/law/your-rights/consumer-rights-complaints-and-scams

 

 

Aged Care: Complaints Escalation and Dispute Resolution

  • If a complainant remains dissatisfied with the outcome of their complaint or grievance they will be provided with the details of other agencies they can use to assist them to achieve a resolution.
  • Escalated complaints will be tracked in the Complaints and Grievances Register in the same manner as other complaints and the same communication processes as outlined above will be applied.
  • Complaints can be lodged with the Aged Care Complaints Commissioner:
  • by phone (and if urgent): 1800 550 552
  • online: https://www.agedcarecomplaints.gov.au/raising-a-complaint/lodge-a-complaint/online-complaints-forms/
  • by mail:

Aged Care Complaints Commissioner

GPO Box 9848

(Your capital city and state/territory)

  • Making sure the letter includes:
    • complainant’s name, address and telephone number;
    • the date complaint is lodged;
    • details of the complaint, including specific dates of events and relevant comments;
    • the name of the service and the state/territory in which it is located; and
    • the name of the person receiving aged care that the complaint relates to.

 

Feedback and Complaints Flowchart

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director
  • End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

DUTY OF CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURE

Policy Code CSP001.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 21 August 2019
Core Module 1,2,4

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedures outlines Holistic Home Care’s duty of care responsibilities to its clients and other stakeholders.

This policy and procedure applies to all staff, contractors and volunteers.

 

2.0 RISK

Failure to provide clear direction on the prevention and management of care concerns could lead to under-reporting of care issues, inadequate responses, and below standard service provision. Direction around care concern prevention and management aims to drive a culture of rights facilitation for people with disability and continued service improvement and staff development.

 

3.0 DEFINITIONS

Dignity of risk – Respecting each individual’s autonomy and self-determination (or “dignity”) to make informed choices and calculated risks for themselves.

Duty of care – A common law concept that refers to the responsibilities of organisations to provide people with an adequate level of protection against harm and all reasonable foreseeable risk of injury. In the context of this policy, duty of care refers to Holistic Home Care’s responsibility to provide its clients with an adequate level of care and protection against foreseeable harm and injury.

Care concerns are defined as acts or situations where a person’s health and/or wellbeing is jeopardised because of a failure to meet an agreed minimum standard of care. Care concerns can be classed as minor, moderate or serious, as the following examples indicate.

  • Minor care concerns are deficits in accepted care standards where the observed actions of a staff member, volunteer, contractor or person on placement, or general organisational practices are likely to pose a minor risk to the safety, wellbeing and quality of life of people with disability, if intervention does not occur. Minor care concerns may include, but are not limited to:
    • Poor attention to a person’s grooming needs (e.g. nails dirty or untrimmed, teeth not brushed, clothing unclean, hair not combed etc.)
    • Being distracted when interacting with person (e.g. talking on personal mobile, listening to portable music device, watching television etc.)
    • Failure to participate with interest and enthusiasm in activities designed to foster a person’s participation in the activities of daily living
    • Restricting opportunities for a person to act independently in the absence of any real safety concerns
    • Requiring reminders to meet deadlines for a person’s appointments, day activities or work
    • Requiring reminders to maintain accurate records.
  • Moderate care concerns are deficits in care standards where the alleged actions of a staff member, volunteer, contractor or person on placement, or general organisational practices have placed the safety, wellbeing and quality of life of people with disability at moderate risk. Moderate care concerns may include, but are not limited to:
    • Frequently ignoring direction from the supervisor/manager regarding the support needs of a person
    • Persistently ignoring a person’s dietary and hydration needs after clear instruction and training
    • Persistent teasing or making fun of a person
    • Taking unauthorised photos of a person
    • Requiring reminders and guidance to attend to a person’s health needs.
  • Serious care concerns are breaches in care standards where the alleged actions of a staff member, volunteer, contractor or person on placement, or general organisational practices have placed people with disability at significant risk or immediate danger of serious harm or have already caused the person with disability serious harm. Serious care concerns may include, but are not limited to:
    • Exposing the person to extreme safety risks
    • Witnessing an act of abuse or neglect without intervening and failing to make an immediate report of the abuse to the manager/supervisor
    • Restricting a person’s freedom of movement without authorisation
    • Intentionally withholding food or drinks from a person for a considerable period of time
    • Adding staff names to person’s bank accounts or property without the approval of the person, and/or family or guardian.

 

3.0 POLICY

  • Holistic Home Care has a zero tolerance policy towards abuse, harm and neglect.
  • Holistic Home Care has a duty of care to ensure that people with disability are not subject to any type of abuse, harm or neglect.
  • Holistic Home Care has a moral and legal obligation to take all reasonable care in providing services and to meet appropriate standards of care. The appropriate standard of care is assessed on the action a reasonable person would take in a particular situation.
  • Duty of care is breached by failing to do what is reasonable or by doing something unreasonable that results in harm, loss or injury to another. This can be physical harm, economic loss or psychological trauma.
  • Staff must use their professional skills and experience to decide what actions they should take in each situation of potential harm. Where possible, concerns should be discussed with the Director.
  • Duty of care must be balanced with an individual’s dignity of risk.
  • The factors to be considered in situations of potential harm are:
    • the risk and likelihood of harm;
    • the sorts of injuries that could occur and an assessment of the seriousness of those injuries;
    • precautions that could be taken to minimise the risk or harm or seriousness of the injury;
    • the usefulness of the activity involving risk; and
    • current professional standards about the issue.
  • Avoiding harm or injury involves:
    • determining when harm or injury is foreseeable;
    • taking account of the seriousness of the potential harm or injury;
    • assessing risks from the other person’s perspective;
    • recognising that some risks are reasonable;
    • not actively harming or injuring the other person;
    • avoiding discrimination and overly restrictive options;
    • avoiding compromises to the rights of others;
    • noticing risks that the person alerts you to;
    • recognising when people are at risk of injury from others;
    • supporting people to confront risks safely;
    • safeguarding others from harm or injury; and
    • maintaining confidentiality.

 

4.0 PROCEDURES

  • All Holistic Home Care staff involved in client care will at all times provide a standard of care that is reasonable and consistent with the policies and procedures outlined in this manual.
  • Staff will not carry out tasks requiring qualifications or training that they do not have.
  • Staff will promptly report concerns about the safety of clients (including environmental hazards) to the Director so that appropriate action can be taken. See Holistic Home Care’s Incident Management and Preventing and Responding to Abuse Neglect and Exploitation Policies and Procedures.
  • Clients will be encouraged to make their own decisions regarding their care at all times. This may require the support of other significant people as per the Decision Making and Choice Policy and Procedure.
  • In managing behaviours of concern staff will first ensure their own safety and the safety of others. No punitive action will be taken and restraint will only be implemented in accordance with the Positive Behaviour Support and Restrictive Practices Policy and Procedure.
  • Clients have a right to complain about Holistic Home Care services and they and their key support person/advocate should be alerted to the Feedback, Compliments and Complaints Policy and Procedure and external complaints bodies.

General Principles

  • People with disability are informed of their inherent human rights and are supported to exercise these rights.
  • People with disability have the right to participate in and contribute to the social, cultural, political and economic life of the community on an equal basis with others.
  • People with disability have the right to live free from abuse, neglect, intimidation and exploitation.
  • People with disability have the right to be respected for their worth, dignity, individuality and privacy.
  • People with disability have the right to realise their potential for intellectual, physical, social, emotional, sexual and spiritual development.
  • People with disability have the right to have access to appropriate assistance and support that will enable them to maximise their capacity to exercise choice and control, and realise their potential.
  • People with disability have the right to pursue any grievances with disability service providers without fear of the discontinuation of services or of recriminations or retribution from disability service providers.
  • People with disability are empowered to determine their own best interests, including the right to exercise informed choice and take calculated risks.
  • The cultural and linguistic diversity of people with disability is respected.
  • People with disability receive quality standards of care.
  • Intervention in the lives of people with disability occurs in the least intrusive way, with the smallest infringements on the fewest rights.
  • Services and supports are based on contemporary evidence-based best practice with a strong focus on person-centred approaches.

Responsibilities

  • Holistic Home Care is responsible for:
    • fostering a person-centred service culture which supports clients’ safety and wellbeing
    • establishing and maintaining a safe service environment
    • providing staff with training and guidance on the prevention and management of care concerns and duty of care. This may include training and guidance in:
      • disability awareness;
      • relevant legislation, policies, procedures and guidelines that may assist them in the delivery of direct support;
      • any individual processes and/or standards of support that the disability service provider has in place;
      • positive support practices and care concerns;
      • identifying and reporting allegations of abuse and deficits of care;
      • recording and reporting.
    • managing care concerns by:
      • providing appropriate guidance and training
      • providing appropriate supervision
      • conducting performance reviews and
      • taking disciplinary action where appropriate
    • reporting serious care concerns where they arise as per the Incident Management Policy and Procedure and Preventing and Responding to Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation Policy and Procedure
    • debriefing clients and staff after care concerns have occurred
    • conducting services reviews focusing on both the individual level and across the organisation;
    • analysing reported care concerns and developing corrective strategies
    • implementing reviewed corrective strategies
    • protecting the confidentiality of client information as per the Privacy and Confidentiality Policy and Procedure.
  • Staff are responsible for:
    • ensuring the safety and wellbeing of clients in their care;
    • acting on duty-of-care guidance and training provided;
    • providing feedback on care management strategies;
    • identifying and recording potential improvements to care provided;
    • discussing care preferences and potentials with the client, family and carers;
    • recording care preferences in the client’s file;
    • discussing improvement to care with their manager;
    • identifying possible care concerns and where possible, acting to prevent them;
    • responding to care concerns as they arise;
    • documenting care concerns and responses in the client file and bringing them to the attention of their supervisor;
    • modelling exemplary behaviours when supporting people with disability and interacting with other staff and care providers, including families and carers.

Service culture

  • Holistic Home Care will deliver person-centred services by ensuring:
    • that clients are involved in making decisions and choices about all aspects of the support services they receive;
    • that individual plans are in place that clearly document individual choices, needs, consent arrangements;
    • that service delivery supports the client’s achievement of their goals;
    • that services are delivered in an ethical, respectful and safe manner that focuses on human rights;
    • that services promote the wellbeing, inclusion, safety and quality of life of people with disability;
    • that interventions or safeguards implemented:
      • have been consented to;
      • are the least restrictive on the fewest rights; and
      • consider the person’s particular goals, aspirations, interests, preferences, strengths and capacities.

Recording and reporting

  • Moderate care concerns may be Reportable Incidents if staff perceive that harm is done to the client. Reportable Incidents should be reported to the NDIS Commission as per the Incident Management Policy and Procedure.
  • Serious care concerns are Reportable Incidents and should be reported to the NDIS Commission as per the Incident Management Policy and Procedure.
  • Holistic Home Care staff will record all care concerns and potential care concerns in the client’s file.
  • The Incident Register will be used to record:
    • all client incidents
    • deficits in care and
    • allegations of deficits in care.
  • Client, family and carer care suggestions will be recorded using the Feedback and Complaints Form and logged in the Complaints Register.
  • Any incident involving a person with disability that may constitute an offence should be reported to the Police. If it is safe, practical and appropriate to do so, staff should simultaneously, or immediately after, consult their supervisor.

 

Monitoring and Review

  • This policy and procedure will be reviewed at least annually, incorporating client and other stakeholder feedback.
  • Holistic Home Care’s service delivery and satisfaction surveys will assess:
    • client and other stakeholder awareness of their rights and the extent to which they feel able and supported to exercise them.;
    • client and other stakeholder satisfaction with Holistic Home Care’s complaints processes; and
    • the extent to which clients feel safe and protected in their dealings with Holistic Home Care.
  • Holistic Home Care’s Continuous Improvement Plan will be used to record and monitor progress of any improvements identified.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Added to reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

 

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

BEHAVIOUR SUPPORT AND RESTRICTIVE INTERVENTIONS POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code CSP005.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 21 August 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 1,2,3, 4.3

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

The purpose of this policy is to:

  • support the delivery of high quality services to clients by improving their quality of life and reducing or eliminating behaviours of concern; and
  • minimise and prevent any physical harm of clients and staff within the service; and
  • introduce the legislative restrictions and requirements related to the use of restrictive practices within the service.

This policy supports staff to appropriately use restrictive practices in regards to people with an intellectual or cognitive disability who exhibit harm-causing behaviour.

For further information, see the information sheets available at www.disability.qld.gov.au or consult the QCAT website www.qcat.qld.gov.au.

 

2.0 DEFINITIONS

Appropriately Qualified Person – A person with the qualifications or experience appropriate to conduct an assessment. Examples include behaviour analysts, medical practitioners, psychologists, psychiatrists, speech and language pathologists, occupational therapists, registered nurses, social workers, and persons with demonstrated experience in positive behaviour support practices. The role of the appropriately qualified or experienced person may be undertaken by DCDSS staff, staff of funded non-government service providers or persons from the private sector.

Chemical Restraint – Chemical restraint of an adult with an intellectual or cognitive disability is the use of medication for the primary purpose of controlling the adult’s behaviour. Using medication for the proper treatment of a diagnosed mental illness or physical condition is not chemical restraint. For the purposes of this definition, an intellectual or cognitive disability is not a physical condition. Diagnosed means a doctor has confirmed the adult has the mental illness or physical condition. Mental illness is defined in Section 12 of the Mental Health Act 2000 (Qld).

Chemical restraint (fixed dose) – Chemical restraint (fixed dose) is medication that is administered at fixed intervals and times. If chemical restraint (fixed dose) in respite is the only restrictive practice the adult is subject to, then the Act requires the service provider to obtain consent from a Guardian for restrictive practice (respite) matter if appointed or an informal guardian, and to keep and implement a policy about use of the chemical restraint. The NDIS Commission’s requirements for the use of chemical restraint includes ‘fixed dose’ applications.

Containment – the physical prevention of the person from freely exiting the premises where they receive disability services, other than by secluding them. The term containment does not apply, however, if they are an adult with a skills deficit only, and their free exit from the premises is prevented by the locking of gates, doors or windows under the Act.

Department of Communities, Disability Services and Seniors (DCDSS) the Queensland department responsible for disability services.

Duty of Care – This is a legal concept meaning the responsibility to take reasonable care to avoid causing harm to another person. A duty of care exists when it could reasonably be expected that a person’s actions, or failure to act, might cause or allow injury to another person.

Functional behaviour assessment a psychological assessment designed to determine why a person engages in challenging behaviour with the aim of addressing those root causes and improving quality of life.

Guardian – Guardians for a restrictive practice matter are appointed by QCAT and are usually family members or close friends of the adult. Guardians must be over 18 years of age but cannot be a paid carer. QCAT may appoint the Public Guardian to protect the rights and interests of an adult in cases where nobody is available to accept the responsibility, or there is a dispute about who should act as guardian or concern about the suitability of a proposed guardian.

Harm – In determining the need to implement a Positive Behaviour Support plan, harm to a person means:

  • physical harm to the person
  • a serious risk of physical harm to the person
  • damage to property involving a serious risk of physical harm to the person

Psychological and financial harm are not considered harm under the relevant definitions.

Informal decision maker – For an adult with an intellectual or cognitive disability, this means a member of their support network, other than a paid carer within the meaning of the Guardianship and Administration Act 2000 (Qld).

Interested person – a person or organisation with an interest in a client’s rights, wellbeing and quality of life. An interested person may be the client, their service provider, guardian or informal decision maker. In policy, the role is determined by an action taken, typically in challenging a decision made: e.g., a service provider acts as an interested person where they challenge a decision made by an informal decision maker or guardian; a guardian acts as an interested person where they challenge a decision made by the Chief Executive DCDSS.

Mechanical restraint – the use, for the primary purpose of controlling a person’s behaviour, of a device to:

  • restrict the free movement of the adult, or
  • prevent or reduce self-injurious behaviour.

The following are not forms of mechanical restraint:

  • using a device to enable the safe transportation (e.g. a harness)
  • using a device for postural support
  • using a device to prevent injury from involuntary bodily movements, such as seizures
  • using a surgical or medical device for the proper treatment of a physical condition
  • using bed rails or guards to prevent injury while the person sleeps.

Physical restraint – Physical restraint of an adult with an intellectual or cognitive disability means the use of, for the primary purpose of controlling their behaviour, any part of another person’s body to restrict the free movement of the adult.

Positive behaviour support plan (PBSP) – A plan to support an adult, including assessment, planning and implementation of strategies to meet the adult’s needs, improve their capabilities and quality of life, and reduce the occurrence of the behaviour that causes harm, by developing skills. The positive behaviour support plan is the vehicle through which positive strategies are implemented while seeking to reduce reliance on the use of restrictive practices.  For service providers to receive immunity from liability under the Act, they must ensure that the positive strategies in the plan are implemented.

Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal (QCAT) – QCAT is responsible for determining whether or not an adult has the capacity to make decisions about their life and whether there is a need to appoint appropriate decision makers / guardians, to act on the adult’s behalf.

Relevant decision maker – a person or government agency responsible for deciding on the use of restrictive practices. ‘Relevance’ is determined by the type of restrictive practice, the duration of the approval and the service environment for which the practice is approved. See the Consent and Approval section in this policy.

Restricting access – Restricting access, at a place where the person receives disability services, to an object to prevent them using the object to cause harm to themselves or others.

Restrictive practice – refers to a range of control measures that limit the rights or freedom of movement of a person with disability. Restrictive practice, as regulated under the Disability Services Act 2006 (Qld), is permitted only when it is the least restrictive option for ensuring the safety of the adult or others. Restrictive practice includes:

  • containing or secluding an adult with an intellectual or cognitive disability, or
  • using chemical, mechanical or physical restraint on an adult with an intellectual or cognitive disability, or
  • restricting access of an adult with an intellectual or cognitive disability.

The Act states that when restrictive practices are proposed for such adults, they must be used in a way that:

  • has regard for the human rights of those adults;
  • safeguards them and others from harm;
  • maximises the opportunity for positive outcomes and aims;
  • reduces or eliminates the need for the use of the restrictive practice; and
  • ensures transparency and accountability in the use of the restrictive practices.

The Act aims to eliminate or reduce the use of restrictive practices and increase the adult’s qualify of life through positive behaviour support.

Seclusion – Seclusion of an adult with an intellectual or cognitive disability means the physical confinement of the adult: alone, at any time of the day or night, in a room or area from which free exit is prevented.

Short-term approval – Time-limited authority to use restrictive practices (maximum 6 mths) where:

  • there is an immediate and serious risk of harm to the adult or others; and
  • the restrictive practice is the least restrictive way of ensuring the safety of the adult or others.

Short-term approval may be sought from:

  • the Public Guardian (for any combination of restrictive practices including containment and/or seclusion) or
  • the Chief Executive DCDSS (for restrictive practices other than containment and seclusion).

(Model) Statement – This statement must be provided to the adult and people with a sufficient and continuing interest in the adult in an approved form and stating:

(a) why the relevant service provider is considering using restrictive practices in relation to the adult
(b) how the adult and the interested person can be involved and express their views in relation to the use of restrictive practices
(c) who decides whether restrictive practices will be used in relation to the adult
(d) how a complaint or review of the use of restrictive practices can be made.

3.0 POLICY

  • Holistic Home Care is committed to ensuring clients with an intellectual or cognitive disability who exhibit behaviour that causes harm are supported in appropriate ways, in a safe environment and in a way that recognises their rights and needs.
  • Where a client’s behaviour presents an immediate and serious risk of harm (i.e. physical harm to a person, a serious risk of physical harm to a person or damage to property involving a serious risk of physical harm to a person) to themselves or another person, short term use of a restrictive practice will be in line with the short term approval provisions of the Disability Services Act 2006 (the Act) and the Guardianship and Administration Act 2000 (the GAA). Longer term use of a restrictive practice will also be consistent with the relevant provisions of these two Acts.
  • Holistic Home Care is committed to providing services in a way that:
    • ensures transparency and accountability in the use of restrictive practices
    • recognises that restrictive practices should not be used to punish or in response to behaviour that does not cause harm to the client or others
    • aims to reduce the intensity, frequency and duration of the behaviour that causes harm to the client or others
    • aims to reduce or eliminate the need for restrictive practice.

 

4.0 PROCEDURE

Important Notes

  • To preserve readability and provide adequate guidance, this procedure is largely written as statements of NDIS provider responsibilities rather than statements of organisational intent. Nonetheless, Holistic Home Care is committed to acting in line with these responsibilities.
  • Restrictive practices require appropriate authorisation prior to use. As restrictive practices limit the freedoms of individuals, organisations may be criminally culpable for failure to obtain authorisation prior to implementation.
  • As of July 2019, and until otherwise advised, NDIS providers seeking to implement restrictive practices in Qld have obligations to both Commonwealth and State bodies. Providers must:
    • seek approval for a behaviour support plan from the DCDSS or the Public Guardian prior to implementing the plan and restrictive practices (where applicable, see below).
    • report to the NDIS Commission at specified intervals.
  • The use of a regulated restrictive practice without authorisation (where applicable) or without a behaviour support plan constitutes a reportable incident to the NDIS Commission. This includes the ad hoc use of restrictive practices to manage crisis situations.
  • Authorisation must be obtained for each specific type of restrictive practice. Authorisation for use of one restrictive practice does not allow a service provider to legally use other restrictive practices.
  • There is no legislative authority for authorising the use of restrictive practices on children (under 18 years) in Qld. It is assumed the child’s guardian can provide authorisation. The NDIS requires providers to develop a behaviour support plan and report monthly to the NDIS Commission.
  • To deliver Behaviour Support, Holistic Home Care must be registered with the NDIS as a specialist behaviour support provider.
  • Holistic Home Care must notify the NDIS Commissioner within one (1) month, unless a longer period has been agreed, of the names and details of behaviour support practitioners they employ or engage to undertake behaviour assessments and develop behaviour support plans.
  • NDIS behaviour support practitioners must have been assessed as suitable to deliver specialised positive behaviour support, including assessments and development of behaviour support plans.

Restrictive Practices

  • A restrictive practice should only be used:
    • where necessary to prevent harm to the client or others and
    • where it is the least restrictive way of ensuring the safety of the client or other.
  • Any clients with challenging behaviours should have a positive behaviour support plan and one should be developed before considering or applying for approval or consent for the use of restrictive practices.
  • Any plan developed and implemented must be monitored and reviewed regularly to ensure it remains appropriate.

Before any restrictive practices can be used, the Disability Services Act 2006 (Qld) generally requires:

  • a positive behaviour support plan;
  • the provision of a statement in the approved form about the proposed use of restrictive practices to the adult, their family members and others in their support network;
  • an individual assessment of the adult;
  • independent, time-limited approval; and
  • plans for monitoring and review.

(Model) Statement

  • Holistic Home Care will provide a statement to relevant clients/families when considering the use of restrictive practice services. The statement will be provided to the person and any interested people in the person’s life. The statement will include:
    • the reasons for considering the use of a restrictive practice;
    • how the person/family can be involved in planning and decision making;
    • who will make the decision whether or not to authorise the restrictive practice; and
    • the avenues for complaint, review and redress.
  • Holistic Home Care will explain the statement in a way that the person is most likely to understand, giving appropriate regard to the adult’s age, culture, disability and communication ability.

 

 

Roles and Responsibilities

  • Staff
    • All staff of Holistic Home Care, including individuals acting for the organisation, must comply with the Act.
    • Holistic Home Care has responsibility for ensuring an individual acting for the service provider has sufficient knowledge of the requirements for the lawful use of a restrictive practice, the skills and knowledge required to use the restrictive practice appropriately and for monitoring the use of a restrictive practice to safeguard against abuse, neglect or exploitation.

 

  • The service manager (Director or delegate) is responsible for:
    • managing risk, assisting staff in identifying the need for planned use of a restrictive practice, requesting a short term approval and ensuring compliance with the conditions of a short term approval.
    • liaising with the relevant decision maker to apply for approval to use restrictive practices;
    • informing the relevant decision maker when an approval is no longer required;
    • notifying the department, using the approved form, when approval expires (form 6-5 “Notification of change to a restrictive practice approval”).
  • The Lead Service Provider
    • Where an adult is receiving disability support from more than one disability service provider, the service providing the most hours of support to the adult should take primary responsibility for coordinating the assessment and planning activities for that adult.
    • In situations where primary responsibility is difficult to ascertain, or by mutual agreement between service providers, this arrangement may be varied. For clarity, any variation should be confirmed in writing.
    • The service provider with primary responsibility is responsible for all activities relating to:
      • assessment,
      • planning and
      • for containment or seclusion, this will include Disability Services.
      • for other restrictive practices, this will include identifying someone (usually within the service) to fulfil the role of appropriately qualified or experienced person.
      • seeking approval or consent from the relevant decision maker.
  • The Public Guardian
    • The Public Guardian has responsibility for short-term approval of any combination of restrictive practices that includes containment and/or seclusion.
  • Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal (QCAT) has responsibility for:
    • appointing guardians;
    • deciding requests for approving the any combination of restrictive practices that includes containment and/or seclusion;
    • deciding on appeals against decisions by the Chief Executive concerning short-term approvals.
  • The Chief Executive, DCDSS has responsibility:
    • to decide requests for a short term approval for the restrictive practices of physical restraint, chemical restraint, mechanical restraint or restricting access to objects (i.e., any combination of restrictive practices not including containment and/or seclusion)
    • to review decisions upon application by an interested person.

 

  • Guardians and Informal Decision Makers
    • A guardian for restrictive practice or an informal decision maker has the responsibility to provide consent for the use of a restrictive practice, other than containment and seclusion.
    • Consent may be given by a guardian for restrictive practice for containment and seclusion when the adult is receiving community access or respite only.

Behaviour Support Practitioners will:

  • have been assessed as suitable to deliver specialised positive behaviour support, including assessments and development of behaviour support plans;
  • meet behaviour support requirements including lodging behaviour support plans that include restrictive practices with the NDIS Q&S Commission;
  • ensure compliance with the QLD DCDSS requirments;
  • undertake ongoing professional development to remain current with evidence-informed practice and approaches to behaviour support, including positive behaviour support.

In collaborating with providers, Behaviour Support Practitioners will:

  • support other providers implementing a behaviour support plan to:
    • deliver services;
    • implement strategies in the plan; and
    • evaluate the effectiveness of current approaches aimed at reducing and eliminating restrictive practices.
  • consider the interface between ‘reasonable and necessary supports’ under a participant’s plan and any other supports or services under a general system of service delivery that the participant receives, and develop strategies and protocols to integrate supports/services as practicable.
  • develop BSPs in consultation with the providers implementing behaviour support plans;
  • provide the BSP to those providers for their consideration and acceptance;
  • facilitate or deliver person-focused training, coaching and mentoring to each of the providers implementing behaviour support plans, and, with each participant’s consent, their support network (where applicable); training covers the strategies required to implement a participant’s behaviour support plan, including positive behaviour support strategies.
  • develop behaviour support plans for each participant, in collaboration with the providers implementing the behaviour support plan.
  • provide oversight where the specialist behaviour support provider recommends that workers implementing a behaviour support plan receive training on the safe use of a restrictive practice included in a plan, to ensure the training addresses the strategies contained within each participant’s behaviour support plan.
  • offer ongoing support and advice to providers implementing behaviour support plans, and, with the participant’s consent, their support network (where applicable), to address barriers to implementation.
  • provide support to the provider/s implementing each participant’s behaviour support plan in responding to a reportable incident involving the use of restrictive practices.
  • notify, and work with, the NDIS Commissioner to address such situations:
    • where effective engagement with providers implementing behaviour support plans is not possible for any reason; or
    • if the supports and services are not being implemented in accordance with the behaviour support plan.

Crisis response

  • A crisis response may be required in situations where:
    • there is a clear and immediate risk of harm linked to behaviour(s), specifically new or a previously unexperienced degree of severity in the escalation of behaviour, and
    • there is no interim or comprehensive Behaviour Support Plan in
  • A crisis response should:
    • involve the minimum amount of restriction or force necessary,
    • the least intrusion and be applied only for as long as is necessary to manage the risk;
    • never be used as a de facto routine behaviour support strategy.
  • Where a crisis response includes the use of a RRP, the use is unauthorised and constitutes a reportable incident (see RRPs as Reportable Incidents below, and the Incident Management Policy and Procedure).
  • Until authorisation is obtained it remains an unauthorised restrictive practi Each occasion where the practice is used constitutes a reportable incident.
  • Where it is anticipated that a crisis response will be needed again, it must be included in a comprehensive or interim behaviour support plan and authorisation for its use must be sought.
  • A registered behaviour support practitioner must be engaged to develop a BSP, and must develop:
    • an interim behaviour support plan that includes provision for the use of the regulated restrictive practice within 1 month after being engaged to develop the plan; and
    • a comprehensive behaviour support plan that includes provision for the use of the regulated restrictive practice within 6 months after being engaged to develop the plan.

Assessments and Planning

Assessments: General

  • A person may only be subject to restrictive practices where:
    • an appropriate assessment has been conducted
    • an appropriate Behaviour Support Plan has been developed.
  • The type of restrictive practice and the services provided determine the:
    • type of assessment,
    • qualifications or experience required to conduct them, and
    • type of plans developed.
  • The following terms are used to differentiate assessments:
    • assessments – for people:
      • receiving accommodation support or community support services and
      • subject to restrictive practices other than containment or seclusion (or a combination of practices).
    • multidisciplinary assessments – for people:
      • receiving accommodation support or community support services and
      • subject to containment or seclusion (or a combination of restrictive practices).
    • risk assessments – for people:
      • receiving respite and/or community access services only.
  • The qualifications and experience required to conduct assessments is as follows:
    • Chemical, mechanical or physical restraint: the assessment must be conducted by an appropriately qualified or experienced person. This person may work within the organisation or may be a clinician from the DCDSS. The use of chemical restraints must be assessed in consultation with the person’s prescribing doctor.
    • Restricting access to objects: an assessment must be conducted but there is no requirement for qualifications or experience.
    • Containment or seclusion: the assessment must be conducted by the DCDSS. Clinicians from Disability Services will undertake assessments and develop plans in collaboration with service providers. Disability Services may also assist in other complex cases where a range of other restrictive practices may be in use.

Assessments and Multidisciplinary Assessment (Accommodation and/or Community Support)

  • The assessment must be made by one or more appropriately qualified or experienced persons, and should:
    • make findings about the nature, intensity, frequency and duration of the behaviour of the adult that causes harm to the adult or others;
    • develop theories about the factors that contribute to the adult’s behaviour such as their living environment, low communication skills and /or medical conditions; and
    • make recommendations about appropriate strategies for meeting the adult’s needs, improving quality of life and the and reducing the intensity, frequency and duration of the adult’s behaviour.

Risk Assessment (Respite and/or Community Access Services)

  • For people only receiving:
    • respite and/or
    • community access services.
  • A risk assessment considers the risks associated with the provision of respite services or community access services to the adult by the relevant service provider including:
    • the risk of the adult’s behaviour causing harm.
    • the risks of the service environment not meeting the needs of the adult.
    • the procedures the relevant service provider will implement to mitigate those risks.

Requirements for the risk assessment depend upon the proposed practice:

  • Physical, mechanical or chemical restraint: assessment completed by one appropriately qualified or experienced person. The appropriately qualified or experienced person may be a clinician from DCDSS or may already exist within the organisation.
  • Chemical restraint: the service provider must consult the adult’s treating doctor, and inform the doctor about the assessment of the adult and the range of strategies proposed to be used in conjunction with chemical restraint. The assessment and positive behaviour support plan must demonstrate that the treating doctor has been consulted throughout. Only the person’s treating doctor can prescribe medication.
  • Restricting access to objects: the service provider must ensure that the assessment is conducted (an appropriately qualified or experienced person is not required).
  • Containment and seclusion: assessment must be completed by at least two people appropriately qualified or experienced in different fields. The assessment must be conducted by the DCDSS. Clinicians from Disability Services will undertake assessments and develop plans in collaboration with service providers. Disability Services may also assist in other complex cases where a range of other restrictive practices may be in use. NDIS behaviour support providers are not permitted to conduct assessments or create behaviour support plans for containment or seclusion.

 

Behaviour Support Plans

Note:

  • Plans must be created in all situations where a person is subject to restrictive practices.
  • Specialist behaviour support providers must lodge plans with the NDIS Commission.
  • All restrictive practices will only be authorised with specified time limits and the practice will be monitored and reviewed.
  • The type of plan will vary according to the type of restrictive practice and service provided.

 

Positive behaviour support plans are required wherever an adult is subject to restrictive practices and is receiving:

  • accommodation support or
  • community support services or
  • either of these services in combination with respite or community access services.

The positive behaviour support plan must describe, at least, the strategies to be used to:

  • Meet the adults needs;
  • Support the development of skills;
  • Maximise opportunities through which the adult can improve their quality of life; and
  • Reduce the intensity, frequency and duration of the adult’s behaviour that causes harm to the adult or others.

The positive behaviour support plan must include at least each of the following:

  • A description of the intensity, frequency and duration of the behaviour and its consequences;
  • the early warning signs and triggers for the behaviour, if known;
  • The positive strategies that must be attempted before using a restrictive practice, including the community access arrangements in place for the adult.
  • For each restrictive practice:
    • a demonstration of why the use of the restrictive practice is the least restrictive way of ensuring the safety of the adult or others;
    • the procedure for using the restrictive practice, including observations and monitoring that must happen while the restrictive practice is being used; and
    • any other measures that must happen while the restrictive practice is being used that are necessary to ensure the adults proper care and treatment and safeguards from abuse, neglect or exploitation.
  • A description of the anticipated positive and negative effects on the adult of using the restrictive practice.
  • The intervals at which use of the restrictive practice will be reviewed by the relevant service provider using the restrictive practice.

Further:

  • Containment and seclusion plans must also assess the suitability of the environment and the maximum amount of time the restrictive practice may be applied.
  • Chemical restraint requires details of the medication, how it is to be taken and the name of the prescribing doctor must be included.

 

Respite or community access plans: If the person is only receiving respite or community access services, a respite or community access plan is required.

Respite or community access plans must contain, at a minimum are:

  • the name of the adult;
  • a description of the behaviour that causes harm to the adult or other (the intensity, frequency and duration of behaviour) and consequences (what happened after the behaviour occurred that may have influenced the chances of it occurring again);
  • a description of the reasons for using the restrictive practices;
  • a description of the restrictive practice being used;
  • any strategies that must be attempted before using the restrictive practice;
  • procedures for using the restrictive practice, including observation and monitoring measures to ensure the adult’s proper treatment and care while the restrictive practice is being used;
  • demonstration of why it is the least restrictive way of ensuring the adult’s safety; and
  • a description of the positive strategies to meet the adult’s needs and improve their quality of life (including community access arrangements) and reduce their behaviour that causes harm.

Further:

  • Containment and seclusion plans must also assess the suitability of the environment and the maximum amount of time the restrictive practice may be applied.
  • Chemical restraint requires details of the medication, how it is to be taken and the name of the prescribing doctor must be included.

Development of the Behaviour Support Plan

The positive behaviour support plan must be developed in consultation with:

  • the person,
  • their guardian or relevant decision maker,
  • all service providers who is providing disability services to the person,
  • further professionals as required.:
    • the treating psychiatrist if the person is subject to a forensic or involuntary treatment order under the Mental Health Act 2000,
    • the person’s physician where chemical restraints are proposed.

 

 

Consent and Approval

The authorisation required to implement a restrictive practice depends on the supports provided and the practices proposed.

Short-term Approval

  • A short term approval to use a restrictive practice is limited to situations where:
    • the client has impaired capacity for making decisions about the use of restrictive practices;
    • the adult’s behaviour has previously resulted in harm to the adult or others;
    • there is an immediate and serious risk that, without the approval, the adult’s behaviour will cause harm to the adult or others;
    • the proposed restrictive practice is the least restrictive way of ensuring the safety of the adult or others;
    • the plan is approved by the Public Guardian or the Chief Executive DCDSS.
  • Short-term approval to use restrictive practices must be obtained from:
    • the Public Guardian (for any combination of restrictive practices including containment and/or seclusion) or
    • the Chief Executive DCDSS (for restrictive practices other than containment and seclusion).
  • Short-term approval is limited to a maximum period of 6 months
  • A short term approval can only be changed or extended under exceptional circumstances. The service manager will need to discuss any such circumstances with the decision maker.
  • Short-term approval ceases when.
    • a QCAT containment or seclusion approval is made or denied;
    • a guardian for a restrictive practice (general) matter is appointed and gives, or refuses to give , consent to the service provider to use the restrictive practice;
    • the term of the approval expires; or
    • the service provider identifies the restrictive practice is no longer needed.

Respite and Community Access services:

  • Where the person is receiving respite or community access services only, the decision to authorise is made by a guardian appointed by QCAT for restrictive practice (respite) matters.
  • Where chemical restraint (fixed dose) in respite is the only restrictive practice measure, the service provider must obtain consent from a guardian for restrictive practice (respite) matter if appointed or an informal guardian, and keep and implement a policy about use of the chemical restraint.
  • Where other restrictive practices are employed in respite, the service provider must obtain consent from the person’s guardian for restrictive practices (respite).

 

Accommodation or Community Support services:

  • Where the person is receiving accommodation support or community support services the required authorisation depends upon the type of practice proposed.
    • Containment or seclusion (and these practices in combination with restricting access to objects): authorisation (approval) is decided by QCAT in consultation with the adult and their guardian or informal decision maker.
    • Physical, chemical or mechanical restraint (and these practices in combination with restricting access to objects): authorisation (approval) is decided by a guardian appointed by QCAT for restrictive practice matters.
    • Restricting access to objects: authorisation is by consent from a relevant decision maker for the adult.

 

Process

For containment or seclusion, the service provider must work with the Chief Executive or delegate to:

  • seek full approval for the use of the restrictive practice/s from QCAT;
  • implement the positive behaviour support plan;
  • review the plan on an ongoing basis to ensure it remains relevant to the adult’s needs and is being implemented as intended;
  • formally review the plan for QCAT at intervals as directed by the tribunal (generally 6 or 12 months).

For physical, mechanical, chemical restraint or restricting access, the service provider must:

  • seek approval from the guardian for a restrictive practice matter for the use of the restrictive practice/s in compliance with the positive behaviour support plan;
  • implement the positive behaviour support plan;
  • review the plan on an ongoing basis to ensure it remains relevant to the adult’s needs and is being implemented as intended;
  • communicate regularly with the guardian about the use of the restrictive practice (including frequency) and implementation of the positive behaviour support strategies in the plan; and
  • formally review the plan with the guardian and seek re-approval on an annual basis.

For adults receiving respite and/or community access services only, the service providers must:

  • seek approval from the informal decision-maker, relevant decision-maker (respite) or the guardian for a restrictive practice (respite) matter for the use of the restrictive practice/s in compliance with the respite/community access plan;
  • implement the respite/community access plan;
  • review the plan on an ongoing basis to ensure it remains relevant to the adult’s needs and is being implemented as intended;
  • communicate regularly with the guardian about the use of the restrictive practice (including frequency) and implementation of the positive behaviour support strategies in the plan; and
  • formally review the plan with the guardian and seek re-approval on an annual basis.

Appeal Processes

  • If an interested person (see definitions) disagrees with the Chief Executive’s decision, they can appeal that decision using the appropriate form (Form 6-1 Application for the review of a decision).
  • If an interested person disagrees with a QCAT decision, they may:
    • appeal the decision to the Supreme Court, or
    • apply to QCAT for a review of the decision, if there is a change in circumstances.
  • If an interested person disagrees with a decision made by a relevant decision maker, they may:
    • request a review of the appointment of the guardian for restrictive practice matters or,
    • (if there isn’t one), ask for one to be appointed.

 

Reporting and Monitoring

Reporting to the DCDSS

The Act also requires specific records to be kept on the use of restrictive practices.

The Department must be notified of all restrictive practice approvals using Form 6-4.  A new form must be submitted when approval/consent to use a restrictive practice as written in the positive behaviour support or community access/respite plan is obtained.

The lodgement of this form generates the creation of a restrictive practices client profile in the service provider’s online data collection (ODC).  Service providers must use this restrictive practices reporting system within ODC to record every instance of use of a restrictive practice.

Reporting to the NDIS Commission

All use of restrictive practices must be reported to NDIS Commission:

  • General implementing providers
    • fortnightly for short-term approvals
    • monthly for longer-term approvals
  • Respite providers – monthly
  • Specialist behaviour support providers – as appropriate

 

Monitoring

All approvals are time-limited and must be reviewed regularly. Many decisions on the use of restrictive practices are subject to formal review by QCAT, which must occur at least once every 12 months. Monitoring of the scheme is achieved by:

  • authorised officers appointed under the Disability Services Act 2006;
  • an investigative function for the Public Guardian under the Guardianship and Administration Act 2000, and/or
  • an inquiry/complaint function for the Community Visitor Program under the Guardianship and Administration Act 2000.
  • compliance with requirements to keep and implement acceptable restrictive practices policies will continue to be subject to rigorous and periodic third-party audits under the Human Services Quality Framework (HSQF).

 

 

Table: Restrictive Practice Requirements.

 

 

 

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS Practice Standards Director

 

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

CLIENTS WHO DO NOT RESPOND TO SCHEDULED VISITS

Policy Code CSP006.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 1,3,4

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

In recognition of the vulnerability of clients receiving community care services, Holistic Home Care has established procedures that, while respecting a client’s privacy and autonomy, their safety is not neglected in the event that they do not respond to staff during a scheduled visit.

This policy and procedure applies to all staff, current and potential clients, their carers and family members.

 

  • POLICY

 

  • Holistic Home Care seeks to ensure the safety of its clients by monitoring the client’s well-being.
  • Holistic Home Care respects the client’s privacy and autonomy. While a client’s autonomy is to be respected at all times there can be many reasons why a scheduled visit is missed. These include:
  • The client may have inadvertently forgotten to inform the care worker/service provider that he/she would not be at home; and/or
  • The client may have fallen, been injured or taken ill and still be in the home.
  • Holistic Home Care will preserve client autonomy by reaching an individualised agreement with the client.

3.0 PROCEDURE

Responsibilities

  • When conducting initial interviews and service reviews, the Director (or delegate) will assess the client’s vulnerability and the need for a non-response plan. A planned response is appropriate for clients with, for example:
    • dementia,
    • a history of falls,
    • mental health problems, or
    • who repeatedly miss scheduled visits.
  • The Director (or delegate) will discuss with the client (and their carer / family member):
    • the possibility that a scheduled home visit finds no response
    • the need to ascertain the client’s safety in that event.
  • The Director (or delegate) will determine the clients attitude to formulating a non-response plan, considering:
    • the client’s willingness to negotiate a planned response;
    • the client’s existing plans (with other services, neighbours, family);
    • who the client would prefer to authorise entry into the premises if the client cannot be contacted;
    • who the client would prefer to check their dwelling: e.g., care worker, neighbour, family member, police/ambulance officer, etc.;
    • the client’s preferred method of gaining entry: e.g.:
      • keys left in a coded key-safe
      • keys left with neighbours, or
      • keys left with Holistic Home Care.
    • The Director will identify with the care worker the most appropriate person to accompany them when entering a client’s home.
    • The Director (or delegate) will consider the client’s preferences in light of:
      • how those preferences will likely affect response time, and suggest ways to increase plan’s effectiveness;
      • the client’s history of non-response, where applicable; and
      • the client’s level of vulnerability.
    • Where a client is receiving services from multiple providers, Holistic Home Care will liaise with other providers to jointly formulate planned responses, if possible and appropriate.
    • Details of the agreement should be documented in the client’s service agreement or other appropriate service documentation, with a copy made available to the client.

Further, Holistic Home Care will

  • implement the service provider’s responsibilities – in the event of a client not responding – as delineated in the agreed planned response;
  • record instances of client non-response, as reported by care workers, in the client file;

The Director (or delegate) may:

  • refer the client to a service that provides a daily phone call to check their well-being (e.g., if the client is receiving a Package, a daily phone call could be included in the care plan);
  • refer the client for a personal alarm system supplier (e.g., if the client is receiving a community care package, this may be provided as part of their care package).

Where no non-response plan exists in the client’s current service agreement, individualised plans will be discussed at service reviews or re-assessments and, if required and agreed to, will be documented in individual service plans and implemented.

Service Agreement

Where a client assessment has indicated the need for a non-response plan, and such a plan has been discussed, the service agreement should:

  • indicate the client’s acceptance or rejection of a non-response plan;
  • include the client’s emergency contact details;
  • include details of the plan as agreed (or rejected);
  • clearly delineate client, service provider and care worker responsibilities;

Client responsibilities

  • The client/carer should notify the service provider if absent from their dwelling for the prearranged visit.
  • The client/carer should:
    • notify nominated emergency contacts;
    • ensure emergency contact details are correct and current.

 

Care Worker Responsibilities

Care Workers will

  • initiate the agreed planned response, should the client not respond to a scheduled visit;
  • report all instances of client non-response to the service provider, even where the client has not agreed to a non-response plan;
  • regularly update carer and/or emergency contact details as part of service delivery response agreed with the client.

 

Client refuses non-response plan

  • The client is not obligated to agree to a planned response.
  • If the client/carer requests, the option of no planned response should be respected.
  • The decision should be documented in the client’s service agreement.

Note: Even where a client has requested that they do not want a planned response, if a care worker has concerns or there is an indication that there may be something wrong, they should raise their concerns with the service provider.

 

 

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS practise standards Director

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

AGED CARE CLIENT CHARTER

Policy Code CSP011.01
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 21 August 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module  

 

 

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure acknowledges the rights and responsibilities of the client, their family and carers.

This policy and procedure applies to the client, their family and friends, Holistic Home Care’s Director and staff, care workers, and others involved in the client’s care.

 

2.0 POLICY

Holistic Home Care delivers services in a respectful manner and in line with the .

Holistic Home Care recognises carers as partners in care, able to participate in decision making in care situations when the care recipient is unable to do so.

 

3.0 PROCEDURE

It is a good idea to read the Charter all the way through. If you do not understand what it means or how it applies to you, you can ask your service provider, seek advice from an independent aged care advocate or ask a family member or a friend to explain it.

It is also important that other people who help care for you know about the Charter. These people might include:

  • your carer, such as a family member, friend or neighbour who regularly provides support and care to you;
  • your nominated representative, who may or may not be legally appointed, for example, someone who has a power of attorney or is a guardian; or
  • your service provider.

 

Client rights

You have the right to:

  • safe and high quality care and services
  • be treated with dignity and respect
  • have my identity, culture and diversity valued and supported
  • live without abuse and neglect
  • be informed about my care and services in a way I understand
  • access all information about myself, including information about my rights, care and services
  • have control over and make choices about my care, and personal and social life, including where the choices involve personal risk
  • have control over, and make decisions about, the personal aspects of my daily life, financial affairs and possessions
  • my independence
  • be listened to and understood
  • have a person of my choice, including an aged care advocate, support me or speak on my behalf
  • complain free from reprisal, and to have my complaints dealt with fairly and promptly
  • personal privacy and to have my personal information protected
  • exercise my rights without it adversely affecting the way I am treated

 

Client responsibilities

You need to:

  • respect the rights of care workers
  • give enough information to the service provider so they can develop and deliver your care plan
  • follow the terms and conditions of your written agreement
  • allow safe and reasonable access for care workers at the times agreed in your care plan
  • pay any fees outlined in your written agreement.

Holistic Home Care’s responsibilities

Under the Aged Care Quality Standards, Holistic Home Care must:

  • provide you information about your services;
  • provide a copy of the Charter of Aged Care Rights
  • retain a copy of the Charter of Aged Care Rights, signed by you, on file;
  • speak with you about any changes to these services;
  • respect your privacy and dignity;
  • handle your concerns or complaints fairly and confidentially; and
  • respect your right to choose someone to speak on your behalf (an advocate) in the case of any concerns or complaints.

Complaints, feedback and concerns

If you, your carer, or anyone else is concerned about the care or services you received, it is important that you discuss this with your service provider first.

If, after discussion with the service provider you do not believe the service provider is meeting their obligations, or that the care and services you are receiving are not appropriate to the level of funding you are receiving for the Home Care Package or services through the Commonwealth Home Support Programme, you may want to contact the National Aged Care Advocacy Program or the Aged Care Complaints Commissioner.

National Aged Care Advocacy Program (NACAP)

You have the right to call on an advocate of your choice to represent you in your dealings with your service provider.

If you need an advocate, one may be made available through the National Aged Care Advocacy Program (NACAP) by calling 1800 700 600.

Aged Care Complaints Commissioner

If you, your carer, or anyone else is concerned about the care or services you receive, you can make a complaint.

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED

 

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

HIGH INTENSITY CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURE

Policy Code CSP007.01
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 21 August 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert
Core Module 4,  4.1

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure guides the delivery of services to clients requiring high intensity care.

This policy applies to all staff, volunteers and contractors involved in the assessment and planning processes and in delivering high intensity supports.

This policy and procedure provides guidance specific to high intensity care, in addition to the Assessment Planning and Review Policy and Procedure and Medication Management Policy and Procedure. It refers to, and should be read in conjunction with, the Clinical Waste Management Policy and Procedure, Incident Management Policy and Procedure.

 

2.0 RISK

High Intensity care may present higher risks to clients, staff, carers the organisation and the community.  Risks increase where:

  • intensity of care increases and/or clients are more reliant upon continuity of care;
  • care is provided in areas not designed for the purpose;
  • responsibility for care, shared between services and/or individuals, is not adequately designated;
  • communication between services and/or individuals is deficient; and
  • risk treatments are not reviewed in line with changes in:
  • client needs;
  • service delivery environment;
  • best practice;

(For risks specific to working in clients’ homes, see the Working in Client Homes Policy and Procedure.)

Client risk: Client risk will be managed and minimised by:

  • working with appropriately qualified and/or experienced staff to create a client support plan;
  • employing appropriately trained and supervised staff to implement the client support plan;
  • ensuring that staff work collaboratively with carers and other involved services, sharing information and defining responsibilities clearly where required.

Clients in Crises and Emergencies

  • Where continuity of service is critical to survival, clients should be included in a Crisis and Emergency Plan and registered on a list of vulnerable persons in case of environmental crisis. See the Fire Safety and Emergency Policy and Procedure.

 

Staff risk: risks to support workers and other staff will be minimised by using:

  • appropriate personal protective equipment
  • appropriate waste disposal materials;
  • appropriate handling techniques and safe work procedures;
  • health surveillance, where required (see the Chemical Use and Storage Policy and Procedure).

 

Risk to carers and the general public will be minimised by:

  • building capacity of carers where possible and appropriate;
  • modifying service delivery areas to minimise risk;
  • managing hazardous materials/equipment appropriately; and
  • disposing of clinical waste appropriately (see Clinical Waste Management Policy and Procedure).

 

Risk to the organisation will be minimised by:

  • complying with state and commonwealth legislations and regulations;
  • liaising with carers and other services as appropriate to establish agreed risk management plans, including clearly-designated responsibilities; and
  • reviewing risk treatment plans regularly

 

3.0 POLICY

Holistic Home Care provides inclusive services by recognising the client’s expertise and goals, and by responding to client feedback.

Holistic Home Care provides professional services by ensuring that staff are appropriately qualified to deliver services, and by monitoring and training staff.

Holistic Home Care provides safe services: minimising risk to the client, staff and general public by ensuring that all standard precautions, safety guidelines and regulations are practiced, and; continually improving processes in line with observation, risk assessments and feedback.

 

4.0 PROCEDURE

Responsibilities

  • Holistic Home Care is responsible to ensure that:
  • each client participates in the assessment of their needs and in developing a plan for their supports;
  • each client’s plan includes an assessment of potential risks to the client, supporters and staff;
  • each client’s plan identifies how risks, incidents and emergencies will be managed, including required actions and escalation to ensure participant wellbeing;
  • the client’s health status is, with their consent, regularly reviewed by an appropriately qualified health practitioner;
  • for medication to be administered by subcutaneous injection, documented written or phone orders are obtained from the prescribing health practitioner.
  • staff are adequately trained and qualified to deliver high intensity care, understand the associated risks and the procedures for identifying and managing incidents and emergencies;
  • staff are monitored to ensure best practice is implemented; and
  • staff are provided with the resources and materials they need to safely deliver services to a high standard.

Assessment and Planning

  • As per the Assessment Planning Policy and Procedure, assessment and planning will recognise clients’ rights:
  • to provide and withdraw consent;
  • to their privacy and confidentiality of their personal information, and their right to access that information;
  • to have a support person or advocate present at assessment and planning;
  • to complain about the services provided;
  • to receive information in the manner with which they are most comfortable;
  • to respect and all other human rights.
  • Individualised plans will be developed for each client receiving high intensity supports.
  • The assessment and planning process will include client input, recognising:
  • their strengths and needs, goals and wishes;
  • their support networks and their right to include family, carers or an advocate in assessments and planning.
  • The plan identifies how risks, incidents and emergencies will be managed, including required actions and escalation to ensure participant wellbeing.
  • Client support planning will include an assessment of risk to clients and staffs in relation to the provision of supports.
  • Risk will be evaluated by a health care worker who:
  • is appropriately trained and experienced in the particular supports being delivered
  • understands the client’s needs
  • is familiar with the hazards and risks associated with the proposed client care
  • is capable of developing appropriate risk treatment strategies and incident/emergency responses.
  • The client support plan will include:
  • documented written or phone orders by the prescribing health practitioner for any medication that trained workers may administer by subcutaneous injection;
  • risks associated with the client’s support needs;
  • risks associated with the client’s home environment;
  • typical symptoms or adverse indications associated with the client’s support needs;
  • processes for managing risks including those presented by the client’s home environment;
  • processes for managing incidents, including required actions and escalation;
  • contact details for emergency escalation.
  • The plan will also include a schedule of health checks to be conducted:
  • with the client’s consent;
  • by a suitably qualified health practitioner;
  • regularly, at intervals determined by the client and the supervising health professional.
  • The client support plan will be kept on the client’s file and be available for reference to support staff.

In-home patient care area

  • Holistic Home Care must ensure that the client’s home has, or can be modified to have, a suitable client/patient care area appropriate to services required and attendant risks. This typically includes:
  • hand-washing facilities;
  • laundry facilities;
  • access to a flushable toilet;
  • a patient administration area, preferably in a non-carpeted area of the home.
  • Where other services or carers are involved in client care, clear agreements will be established regarding:
  • processes;
  • communication; and

Incident Management

  • Incidents must be managed as per the Incident Management Policy and Procedure (workplace incidents) or the Preventing and Responding to Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation Policy and Procedure (client incidents).

Review

Review of Client Support Plan

  • The client’s support plan will be reviewed quarterly, on request, or as changes in circumstances require.
  • Holistic Home Care will incorporate client feedback in:
  • the client’s support plan, where appropriate;
  • the continuous improvement process; and
  • staff training.

Staff Performance Review and Training

  • Holistic Home Care will ensure that staff providing high intensity care:
  • are regularly monitored; and
  • have access to the information they need to work safely and effectively.
  • Holistic Home Care will provide staff training in order to address:
  • feedback from the client;
  • observations from supervision;
  • incident reports;
  • the client’s changing needs as advised by the health worker conducting client health checks; and
  • changes in clinical practice and/or regulations.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed

 

Policy Code NDISP001.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

NDIS CONFLICT OF INTEREST POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

  • PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy outlines the process Holistic Home Care must take in managing any perceived or actual conflicts of interest in relation to the contracting and delivery of supports to participants of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

Holistic Home Care is committed to ensuring that any potential conflicts of interest are identified and managed in a manner that ensures participants retain choice and self-determination in relation to the use of their funding and the integrity of the organisation is protected.

Under the NDIA Terms of Business, registered providers must not constrain, influence or direct decision making by a person with a disability and/or their family so as to limit that person’s access to information, opportunities and choice and control.

This policy and procedure applies to the all Holistic Home Care NDIS services.

 

2.0 DEFINITIONS

Conflict of Interest:  A conflict of interest may occur in the situation where Holistic Home Care as a registered provider enters into a Service Agreement with a participant to deliver Plan Management, or Coordination of Supports and other funded supports included in a participant’s plan.

3.0 POLICY

Conflict can occur between the organisation’s interest and the participant’s interest. For example, a conflict of interest exists when an organisation is in a position to benefit by both managing a participant’s plan and providing Support Coordination and other types of supports to a participant, when it may not be in the participant’s best interests to receive both from the same provider.

A conflict of interest can occur when Holistic Home Care, through their Plan Management or Support Coordination (where provided), refers the participant to another service offered by Holistic Home Care when there are alternative organisations that provide the same type of service, and which may better meet the needs of the participant. In some locations there may be limited service options available, but the participant has a right to know what options are available to them.

In these circumstances, it is incumbent on Holistic Home Care to ensure participants are provided with transparent information and advice about the full range of options available to them, so they can exercise informed choice. There may also be occasions when a participant exercises their choice to receive both types of supports from the same organisation because they prefer to deal with a single provider or have an on-going trusting relationship with that provider. Once the participant makes an informed choice and the NDIA has been consulted where necessary, the conflict of interest will have been appropriately dealt with.

 

4.0 PROCEDURE

Managing Conflicts of Interest

When a potential conflict of interest has been identified, and before a service quote or Service Agreement is developed, Holistic Home Care must:

  • Advise the participant of the potential for a conflict of interest and explain how this can occur
  • Advise the participant of alternative options for receiving Plan Management, Coordination of Supports or other supports from different providers
  • All advice and information provided to a participant about support options (including those not directly delivered by Holistic Home Care) will be transparent and promote choice and control
  • Ensure the participant understands the potential conflict of interest by asking them to explain in their own words their understanding of what it means (this ensures informed consent)
  • Obtain the participant’s consent to proceed with the service quote or Service Agreement by drawing to their attention the consent clause contained in the Service Agreement with Holistic Home Care and the participant
  • It may be appropriate for the Director to contact the NDIA for advice before proceeding.
  • Holistic Home Care will manage conflicts of interest as they arise in line with NDIS Operational Guidelines or pricing arrangements and guidelines.

Further:

  • Staff providing Plan Management or Support Coordination will not have any role in the coordination of delivery of direct services for the participants they are supporting
  • Where Holistic Home Care operates as a financial intermediary, systems will be in place to ensure funds that are allocated to participants remain independent of funds used for other organisational purposes and will only be used for the purposes intended. Clear guidelines will be in place regarding the allocation of NDIS funds, the independence of funds and the process of managing a participant’s funds as stipulated in the participant’s plan.
  • Holistic Home Care staff or volunteers will not accept any offer of money, gifts, services or benefits that would cause them to act in a manner contrary to the interests of the participant.
  • Holistic Home Care or its staff or volunteers will have no financial or other personal interest that could directly or indirectly influence or compromise the choice of provider or provision of supports to a participant. This includes the obtaining or offering of any form of commission.

 

Recording a Conflict of Interest

All identified conflicts of interest are to be reported to the Director who will record them in the Conflicts of Interest Register.

The Conflicts of Interest Register will document:

  • The participants name;
  • The participants NDIS number;
  • The nature of the conflict of interest; and
  • A summary of how the conflict was managed, including any advice from the NDIA.

The Register will be routinely reviewed.

 

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS practise standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

CLINICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT POLICY AND PROCEDURE

Policy Code CSP008.01
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 21 August 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2,4

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy and procedure ensures the safety of clients, staff and the general public by ensuring that waste produced in the delivery of services is appropriately managed.

This policy applies to all staff, volunteers and contractors involved in delivering supports that generate clinical waste.

This policy and procedure draws on the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Qld), Work Health and Safety Regulation 2011 (Qld), Environment Protection Regulation 2008 (Qld), the Environment Protection Act 1994 (Qld), Guideline: Clinical and Related Waste (ESR, Qld: 2015), Waste Reduction and Recycling Regulation 2011 (Qld),  Guide for Handling Cytotoxic and Related Waste (Workplace Health and Safety Queensland: 2018), and the National Guidelines for Waste Management in the Health Industry (National Health and Medical Research Council, Cwth).

This policy and procedure should be read in conjunction with the Chemical Use and Storage Policy and Procedure and the High Intensity Care Policy and Procedure.

2.0 RISK

The principal risks arising from clinical waste management are:

  • risks to the client due to improper management of clinical waste;
  • risks to staff and carers due to exposure to infectious or toxic waste elements;
  • risks to the environment and public due to improper disposal of clinical waste; and
  • risks to the organisation due to litigation concerning improper storage and disposal of clinical waste.

Risks concerning the proper management and disposal of clinical waste are addressed in this policy and procedure.

Risks arising where other services or carers are involved in client care are addressed in the High Intensity Care Policy and Procedure.

Risks arising due to the improper disposal of clinical waste will be minimised by following this policy and regularly reviewing the relevant legislation.

Client-specific Risk Assessments

  • The generation of clinical waste will be assessed as part of client risks assessments.
  • Holistic Home Care will assess and document the risks to staff associated with clients in their care prior to commencing service delivery, by:
    • consulting data sheets for client medications;
    • considering procedures required and likelihood of staff exposure;
    • considering the environment in which client care will take place;
    • using the Hazardous Substance Risk Assessment; and
    • consulting with the relevant staff.
  • The Hazardous Substance Risk Assessment will be attached to the client’s file.
  • Staff will consider the risks involved in delivering services.

3.0 DEFINITIONS

Clinical waste – (medical waste) is waste which has the potential to cause sharps injury, infection or disease.

Cytotoxic waste – Cytotoxic waste is material that is, or may be, contaminated with a cytotoxic drug during the preparation, transport or administration of chemotherapy. Cytotoxic drugs are toxic compounds known to have carcinogenic, mutagenic and/or teratogenic (causing foetal and/or neonatal abnormalities) potential. Direct contact with cytotoxics may cause irritation to the skin, eyes and mucous membranes, and ulceration and necrosis of tissue. The actual pathway through which exposure occurs was still unknown, however dermal exposure has been suggested to be the main route of exposure. A clear relationship has been found between dermal exposure levels and direct sources of exposure for all tasks.

General Waste – waste that does not have the potential to cause sharps injury, infection or hazard. Such waste may be disposed of in the same way as domestic waste. This stream includes incontinence pads, sanitary waste, disposable nappies, saline, dextrin, oxygen masks, drained IV bags and tubing, gloves (not blood stained), napkins and sterile wraps.

Pharmaceutical Waste – pharmaceuticals or other chemical substances including expired or discarded pharmaceuticals, filters or other materials contaminated by pharmaceutical products.

Related Waste – Related waste means waste that constitutes, or is contaminated with, chemicals, cytotoxic drugs, human body parts, pharmaceutical products or radioactive substances.

PPE – Personal Protective Equipment

Sharps – Any object capable of inflicting a penetrating injury, which may or may not be contaminated with blood and/or body substances. This includes hypodermic needles, intravenous sets (‘spikes’), Pasteur pipettes, broken glass, and scalpel blades. Various hard plastic items, such as intact amniotic membrane perforators and broken plastic pipettes, also contribute to sharps.

 

4.0 POLICY

Clinical and related wastes can present problems in handling, storing, transporting and/or disposing for the following reasons:

  • the potential risk to personnel involved in the disposal of some of these wastes, and to the public, if it is not managed correctly; and
  • the potential for pollution of the environment or visual offence if wastes are not disposed of properly.

 

Holistic Home Care will minimise harm to the health and wellbeing of its staff, its clients and the general public by complying with regulations concerning waste management. Specifically, Holistic Home Care seeks to ensure:

  • the safety of its service delivery staff by providing them with the information, processes, and equipment needed for personal protection and the safe handling of hazardous materials;
  • the safety of clients, their families and carers, by building capacity to effectively manage clinical waste generated in their homes;
  • the safety of the general public by minimising the opportunity for the spread of disease and accidental injury arising from the handling and disposal of clinical waste;
  • the potential for environmental pollution is minimised by the correct disposal of hazardous chemicals;
  • the effectiveness of Holistic Home Care’s clinical management by reviewing and continually improving waste handling and safety processes.

 

 

5.0 PROCEDURE

Responsibilities

Compliance Requirements

  • Where services generate clinical waste, Holistic Home Care is responsible to:
    • ensure that staff are appropriately trained and/or qualified to deliver services;
    • work with service-delivery personnel to assess the risks associated with clinical wastes generated;
    • ensure that appropriate clinical waste disposal methods are available to service-delivery personnel;
    • review waste management practices regularly;
    • develop an emergency plan to respond to clinical waste or hazardous substances issues and incidents (and, if implemented, to review and revise the plan as needed);
    • supply staff with:
      • appropriate Personal Protective Equipment;
      • appropriate waste disposal materials and spills kits;
      • information (where available) about particular client risks regarding transmissible infections and hazardous substances in clinical waste;
      • information about identifying, handling, transporting and disposing of all clinical waste streams generated in service delivery;
      • information about emergency procedures, incident management, and use of spill kits appropriate to the risks and hazards presented by the clinical waste streams generated in service delivery.

Staff responsibilities

  • Where services generate clinical waste, staff are responsible to:
    • understand the hazards presented by clinical waste;
    • handle and dispose of clinical waste appropriately;
    • appropriately store and use the PPE supplied;
    • notify their supervisor where the clinical waste generated exceeds (or is likely to exceed) the equipment supplied; and
    • report all incidents appropriately.

Segregation and Handling

  • Specific waste streams must be managed in line with Queensland legislation, licensing, waste management contract and waste minimisation practices.
  • Failure to segregate waste is an offence under the WRR Regulation.
  • Waste should be segregated at the point of generation.
  • Waste streams are divided into the following categories for appropriate handling:
    • Clinical waste, including:
      • animal waste
      • discarded sharps
      • human tissue waste
      • laboratory and associated waste directly resulting from the processing of specimens
    • Related waste, including:
      • chemical waste
      • waste constituted by, or contaminated with, cytotoxic drugs
      • human body parts
      • pharmaceutical waste
      • radioactive waste
    • General Waste
  • Where waste streams overlap, the most hazardous component should determine labelling and disposal: e.g., sharps that are contaminated with cytotoxic materials must be labelled and disposed of as cytotoxic waste (by high temperature incineration).
  • Holistic Home Care will ensure that all staff generating waste understand how to segregate materials through:
    • monitoring and training;
    • providing suitable containers, labels and bags;
    • ensuring all waste can be easily, safely and correctly segregated at the point of generation.

 

Labelling

  • Clinical and related wastes must be properly segregated, packaged, labelled, handled and transported to minimise risk to waste handlers and the community, such as needle stick injuries and transmission of infectious diseases.
  • All sharps and other waste containers should meet the specific Australian Standards requirements. Clinical and related waste must be segregated and identified by following colour coding and markings:
  • Container labels must be displayed on at least two sides

 

 

General waste

  • General waste is any waste that does not present a risk of infection or hazard.
  • General waste includes:
    • aprons, gowns and gloves;
    • sanitary waste, napkins and sterile wraps;
    • oxygen masks;
    • drained dialysis wastes, drained saline or dextrin IV bags, nasogastric feeding tubing;
    • intravenous drip equipment that has not been contaminated with pharmaceuticals, hazardous chemical additives, such as cytotoxic or radioactive drugs – and from which sharps have been removed.
    • Incontinence pads and disposable nappies – unless the material is locally judged to come from an infectious patient is visibly blood-stained, or is disposed of in a manner likely to cause offence, in which case it must be treated as clinical waste.
  • General waste should be handled in a manner consistent with domestic waste, and disposed of at point of waste generation using domestic waste disposal facilities or flushed down domestic toilets into sewer lines.
  • Standard precautions should be taken as appropriate:
    • gloves and other personal protective equipment as required;
    • double bagging sanitary waste, incontinence pads and disposable nappies;
    • flushing fluids with the toilet seat down to contain aerosols.

Clinical Waste

  • Clinical waste means waste that has the potential to cause disease, including, for example, the following:
    • animal waste
    • discarded sharps
    • human tissue waste
    • laboratory waste.

 

Disposal of clinical waste

  • All medical waste, other than sharps, must be placed in clearly labelled heavy-duty yellow plastic bags. Bags intended for domestic use are unsuitable for this waste.
  • Any bulk fluids should be emptied into domestic sewerage systems.
  • Clinical waste must be:
    • incinerated in a registered facility;
    • collected for disposal by:
      • a person licensed for the collection and transport of medical waste; or
      • a council.
    • Or transported by a person employed or engaged in the business producing the waste directly to:
      • a waste depot licensed to receive medical waste
      • a hospital.

Laundry

  • To minimise the risk of disease transmission via exposure to contaminated linen, used linen or linen soiled with blood or other body substances should be handled, processed and disposed of in a manner that prevents exposure to skin and mucous membranes, contamination of clothing and transfer of microorganisms to other persons and the environment:
    • used, soiled or wet linen should be bagged at the point of generation;
    • linen that is heavily soiled with blood, other body substances or other fluids (including wet with water) should be bagged in clear leak-proof bags;
    • linen bags should not be filled completely as this will increase the risk of rupture in transit and injury to bag handlers.
    • used or soiled linen are not to be rinsed or sorted in patient care areas;
    • domestic washing machines are only to be used to launder patients’ personal items and only one patient’s personal items can be washed per cycle.

 

Clinical Waste: Sharps

All sharps pose a potential hazard and can cause injury through cuts or puncture wounds. Discarded sharps may be contaminated with blood, body fluid, microbiological materials, and toxic, cytotoxic or radioactive substances. There is disease potential if the sharp was used in the treatment of a patient with an infectious disease.

 

Safe handling of sharps

  • It is important that all staff are aware of the inherent risk of injury associated with the use of sharps such as needles, scalpels and lancets. When handling sharps the following principles apply:
    • the person using the sharp is responsible for its safe disposal;
    • dispose of the sharp immediately following its use and at the point of care;
    • dispose of all sharps in designated puncture resistant containers that conform to relevant Australian Standards (AS/NZS 4261:1994 reusable; AS 4031:1992 non-reusable);
    • dispose of sharps disposal containers when they are ¾ full or reach the specified fill line, seal appropriately and place in the clinical waste stream;
    • never pass sharps by hand between health care workers;
    • if carrying a sharp is unavoidable, then it must be carried in a container such as a kidney dish, so as to minimise the likelihood of a sharps injury;
    • never recap used needles unless an approved recapping device is used;
    • never bend, break or otherwise manipulate by hand a needle from a syringe.

 

Sharps containers

  • Sharps containers must comply with AS4031/1992 or AS/NZS 4261:1994 and must:
    • be designed and constructed to reduce the possibility of injury to handlers during collection and transport of sharps for disposal;
    • be resistant to impact, penetration and leakage;
    • be stable,
    • have integrity of the handles/other carrying features and closure device, and
    • have a capacity indicator (fill line) marked on the outside wall of the container;
    • be strategically placed so as to minimise the distance sharps are carried to the disposal point;
    • in non-clinical community settings, such as within a patient’s home, be placed out of the reach of children (1.4m above the floor);
    • be transported within a compartment in the car separated from the driver’s compartment; and
    • be transported to a hospital, community health centre or multi-purpose service for final disposal.
  • Reusable sharps containers must be readily emptied and cleaned before reus
  • Reusable sharps containers must not be used to store cytotoxic waste.

Related Waste

Related Waste: Cytotoxic

  • Cytotoxic waste is material that is, or may be, contaminated with a cytotoxic drug during the preparation, transport or administration of chemotherapy. It includes:
    • cytotoxic pharmaceuticals past their recommended shelf life, unused or remaining drugs in all forms, contaminated stock, and cytotoxic drugs returned from a patient
    • contaminated waste from preparation processes
    • sharps and syringes, ampoules and vials
    • intravenous infusion sets and containers empty cytotoxic drug bottles
    • cotton wool from bottles containing cytotoxic drug
    • used HEPA or chemical filters and other disposable contaminated equipment
    • contaminated personal protective equipment (for example – gloves, disposable gowns, shoe covers, respirators)
    • swabs, cloths, mats and other materials used to clean cytotoxic contaminated equipment or to contain spills
    • contaminated body substance receptacles (for example – disposable vomit bags)
    • dressings, bandages, nappies, incontinence aids and ostomy bags
    • heavily soiled and contaminated bedding that is determined to be disposed
    • contaminated specimens from the laboratory.
  • Cytotoxic residue is present in patients’ bodily fluids.
  • Cytotoxic waste includes:
    • gloves, gowns, dosing cups and all equipment used in the preparation and administration of chemotherapy or anti-neoplastic drugs;
    • bodily fluids of chemotherapy patients and equipment used to manage bodily fluids;
    • soiled linen and clothing of chemotherapy patients;
    • napkins and other cleaning materials used to collect bodily fluid spills and wipe surfaces such as bed rails, toilet seats, grab rails which chemotherapy patients touch.
  • Holistic Home Care will:
    • advise staff where a client is undergoing cytotoxic drug treatment
    • provide appropriate spill kits;
    • provide information on the contents of a spill kit;
    • provide written instructions on how to manage a spill in a home situation;
    • provide precautionary information to carers who are pregnant or breastfeeding;
    • provide the opportunity for staff members to opt-out of working with clients undergoing cytotoxic drug treatment on the basis of:
      • pregnancy, planned pregnancy or breast feeding;
      • illness and infectious disease;
      • abnormal pathology results.
  • Staff caring for clients undergoing treatment with cytotoxic drugs will:
    • avoid skin contact with the patient’s body substances;
    • prevent generating aerosols when handling the patient’s body waste
    • dispose of waste, such as urine, faeces, vomitus, the contents of ostomy bags, incontinence aids and disposable nappies
    • contain waste generated from drug administration in a dedicated container;
    • keep waste containers secure and appropriately labelled;
    • clean-up spills immediately using provided spill kits;
    • transport cytotoxic waste in sealed containers in the boot (not cabin) of a vehicle.

Disposal of cytotoxic waste

  • Hard waste: Cytotoxic waste generated in the home may include dressings, nappies, incontinence aids, ostomy bags, catheters, catheter bags and the like. Health care workers should bag these items (purple bag) and remove the bags following their visit. The waste should be disposed in a cytotoxic waste bin and taken back to the health care facility, in the boot of a vehicle, for disposal in a cytotoxic waste bin.
  • If waste consists of a mixture of cytotoxic and other waste it must be incinerated at the temperature recommended for cytotoxic waste.
  • In the absence of a health care worker, a patient or carer should dispose of the waste into a sealed plastic bag, then into the household rubbish.

 

  • Soft waste: Cytotoxic contaminated body waste – i.e., urine, faeces, vomitus, the contents of ostomy bags and the like – should be disposed of into a household toilet by using a full flush and with the lid down.

 

Laundry

  • All linen should be handled with care, placed with minimal handling into leak-proof bags for transport to laundry facilities.
  • Grossly contaminated linen should be discarded as cytotoxic waste.
  • Recommended PPE:
    • gloves (double)
    • coveralls / gowns
    • respiratory protective equipment
  • Staff should, and should inform clients and their carers to:
    • bag laundry at the location of use;
    • wear two pairs of disposable gloves while sorting linen for laundering;
    • unbag, sort and wash contaminated items separately;
    • wash soiled linen at the maximum cycle and in hot or cold water, then line dry;
    • put the gloves into a plastic bag, then into the household garbage.
  • Once laundered, contaminated linen can be reused.

 

 

Related Waste: Pharmaceutical

  • Pharmaceutical waste may arise from:
    • pharmaceuticals that have passed their recommended shelf life;
    • pharmaceuticals discarded due to off-specification batches or contaminated packaging;
    • pharmaceuticals returned by patients or discarded by the public;
    • pharmaceuticals that are no longer required by the establishment; and
    • waste generated during the manufacture and administration of pharmaceuticals.
  • Non-hazardous materials such as normal saline or dextrin need not be considered as pharmaceutical wastes.
  • Excess stock of pharmaceuticals, either current or expired, may be returned to a relevant authority or collection centre for appropriate disposal or distribution. The disposal method depends on the chemical composition of the material. This must be checked with the manufacturer. The components must be interpreted/classified according to the known toxicity of the pharmaceutical involved, and the degree of contamination. If in doubt, consult the pharmacist.

Storage

  • Clinical and related waste must be stored in a manner that is not offensive and that minimises the threat to health, safety or the environment.
  • Any waste mixed with medical waste must be treated as medical waste.
  • Where it is necessary to store clinical waste, Holistic Home Care will provide an enclosed structure such as a shed, garage, cage, fenced area or separate loading bay to store waste.
  • Holistic Home Care will ensure that provided storage areas:
    • are cleaned regularly and to be kept free from odour and vermin
    • are located away from food and clean storage areas,
    • are inaccessible to the public,
    • have rigid, impervious flooring;
    • have a lockable door or, if not practicable, locks on all bins in the area;
    • have, where practicable, loading and unloading space within the storage area;
    • have clean up facilities, spills kits, appropriate drainage and bunding (i.e. retaining walls within the storage area to contain any material that has escaped).

 

 

Safe Work Procedures

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

  • Holistic Home Care will supply staff with PPE:
    • suitable for the nature and degree of the identified hazard.
    • recommended in applicable Safety Data Sheets (SDS).
  • Holistic Home Care will ensure staff understand:
    • the standard precautions (see the Infection Control Policy and Procedure);
    • the hazards identified and the means of minimising risk;
    • the proper selection, fitting (donning/doffing, or putting on/removing), storage and maintenance of PPE;
    • the proper use of spill kits provided.
  • Holistic Home Care will ensure – where possible – that all contractors, such as waste collectors, comply with all WHS and other legislative requirements, e.g. wearing appropriate PPE.

 

Spills Kits

  • Clinical Waste Spill kit could contain:
    • broom
    • mop and mop bucket
    • a large (10 litre) reusable plastic container or bucket with fitted lid, containing;
    • 2 plastic general waste garbage bags for the disposal of any general waste;
    • 2 Clinical waste bags for the disposal of Clinical waste;
    • a pan and scraper;
    • 5 granular disinfectant sachets containing 10,000 ppm available chlorine or equivalent;
    • disposable rubber gloves suitable for cleaning
    • detergent
    • disposable cloths and sponges
    • disposable overalls
    • heavy duty gloves suitable for handling Clinical waste
    • eye protection
    • a plastic apron
    • a mask (for protection against inhalation of powder from disinfectants, or aerosols generated from the spills).
    • waste spill sign
    • incident report form
  • Cytotoxic spill kits could contain:
    • mop and mop bucket
    • large (10 litre) reusable plastic container or bucket with fitted lid, containing;
    • 2 cytotoxic waste bags for the disposal of cytotoxic waste
    • 2 pairs of disposable hooded overalls
    • shoe covers
    • long heavy duty gloves
    • latex gloves
    • a mask (for protection against inhalation of powder from disinfectants, or aerosols generated from the spills).
    • splash goggles
    • absorbent toweling / absorbent spill mat
    • 5 granular disinfectant sachets containing 10,000 ppm available chlorine or equivalent;
    • a pan and scraper.
    • waste spill sign
    • incident report reform

 

Spills

Blood or body substance spills

  • Spot Cleaning
    • Put on disposable gloves
    • Wipe up spot immediately with a damp cloth, alcohol, or paper towel may be used.
    • Discard contaminated materials in Clinical waste bag.
    • Wash hands thoroughly.
  • Other spills
    • Collect appropriate spill kit from designated location
    • Wear disposable gloves, eyewear, mask and apron
    • Remove the bulk of the blood and body substances with absorbent material
    • Use pan and scraper to scoop up absorbent materials and unabsorbed blood or body substances
    • Discard clinical materials in clinical waste bag for disposal
    • Wash hands thoroughly
    • Mop the area with a detergent solution
    • Wipe the site with disposable towels soaked in a solution of 1% (10,000 ppm) available chlorine.
    • Clean and disinfect pan, scraper, mop and bucket
    • Re-usable eyewear and apron should be cleaned and disinfected after use
    • Replace any used items and return the spill kit to the designated location
  • If a spill occurs on a carpeted area, mop up as much of the spill as possible using disposable towels then clean with a detergent. Arrange for the carpet to be shampooed as soon as possible.

Cytotoxic Spills

  • Do not use alcohol-based agents to clean cytotoxic spills as some drugs can bind to alcohol and increase the area of contamination. Use sodium hypochlorite (liquid bleach) or Milton tablets or solution where possible.
  • Recommended PPE:
    • coveralls / gown
    • gloves
    • protective eyewear
    • shoe covers
    • respiratory protective equipment
    • head covering
  • Spills of cytotoxic materials should be immediately contained and cleaned using the following procedure:
    • Collect cytotoxic spill kit from designated location
    • Put out a sign to notify of potential hazard
    • Don a particulate (P2) respirator, then appropriate personal protective equipment
    • Double glove with latex inner and heavy duty outer gloves
    • For liquid spills, wait a few seconds for aerosols to settle, then cover the spill using available absorbent material, taking care not to generate any splashes (aerosols)
    • Scrape up any broken glass and absorbent materials and place in cytotoxic waste bag
    • Mop the area with warm water. Detergent may be applied as a final step, washing from area of least contamination
    • Dry the affected area with absorbent towels or other suitable materials
    • Remove shoe covers, outer gloves, disposable overalls, mask and goggles and place in waste bag/container
    • Discard the contaminated cleaning waste into the cytotoxic plastic waste bag
    • Seal waste bag and place in cytotoxic waste bin or have it collected in the usual manner.
    • Wash hands and any exposed skin
    • Complete an incident report
    • Replace any used items and return the spill kit to the designated location

Incidents

Immediate response

  • Penetrating injury/needlestick injury:
    • Induce bleeding by gently squeezing
    • Wash promptly and thoroughly with soap and water
  • Mucosal Splash:
    • Rinse copiously with water
    • If eyes are affected rinse while open with tap water or saline
    • If blood gets in the mouth, spit out and rinse with water and spit out aga Repeat several times.

 

Cytotoxin Contamination

Clothing and personal protective equipment

  • Immediately remove outer gloves, gown and any contaminated clothing
  • Place disposable personal protective equipment in the cytotoxic waste bin
  • Contaminated clothing should be bagged separately, machine washed separately and line dried
  • Remove and dispose of inner gloves.

Skin exposure

  • Remove contaminated clothing as above
  • Wash the affected skin with soap and clean thoroughly with copious amounts of water
  • Report to supervisor immediately
  • Seem immediate medical advice and further medical attention as necessary.

Penetrating injuries, skin and other body contact

  • Wash the affected skin with soap and clean thoroughly with copious amounts of tepid water and do not scrub or create friction in the area of concern
  • Do not administer anaesthetic drops or ointments
  • Report to supervisor immediately
  • Seek immediate medical advice and further medical attention as necessary
  • Document incidents.

Mucosal exposure

  • Immediately flush the affected area (for example – eye) with an isotonic saline solution for at least 15 minutes – continuous irrigation may be facilitated with an intravenous infusion set connected to an intravenous normal saline
  • Report to supervisor immediately
  • Seek immediate medical advice and further medical attention as necessary
  • Document incidents.

 

Initial Evaluation

  • Staff should attend an Accident/Emergency facility to assess their exposure to risk and appropriate treatment.
  • For initial and/or subsequent blood screening staff may choose to attend:
    • Accident/Emergency Department
    • A Sexual Health Clini
    • General Practitioner.

 

Internal Reporting

  • Staff should report all incidents internally to their supervisor.
    • Report incident to Super
    • Complete incident form
    • Complete WHSQ notification form (if required – see below).
    • Return form/s to your Supervisor immediately.

Notifying Incidents: Workplace Health & Safety Qld

  • All incidents should be reported as per the Incident Management Policy and Procedure.
  • An incident involving clinical or related waste it must be reported to WHSQ by:
    • calling 1300 362 128
    • completing an online incident notification form
    • emailing a completed Incident Notification form to aaa@oir.qld.gov.au.
    • faxing a completed Incident Notification form to (07) 3874 7700

 

Incident recording, investigation and reviews

  • All incidents will be recorded, investigated and reviewed as per the Incident Management Policy and Procedure.

Review

  • The Director (or delegate) will review processes for handling and disposal of clinical waste as per the Internal Review and External Audit Schedule or as circumstances change.
  • All reviews will be conducted in reference to:
    • an assessment of current risks and hazards;
    • an audit of current practices and compliance;
    • consultation with relevant staff;
    • current legislation and regulations;
    • relevant incident reports and complaints.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED

 

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

NDIS CANCELLATION POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code NDISP002.02
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 1,2,3

 

1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE

This policy provides a framework for Holistic Home Care’s processes and obligations, should a client’s parent/guardian request a cancellation of services.

This policy and procedure applies to the Director, staff, students, contractors and volunteers and all potential and existing clients, their family members and other supporters.

 

2.0 DEFINITIONS

Cancellation – Refers to an individual notifying Holistic Home Care, in advance, that scheduled hours of service are not required or unable to be received. There are two categories of cancellation:

  • Short notice – where less than a minimum of 24 hours’ notice is provided.
  • Reasonable Notice – where 24 hours or greater notice is provided.

No Show – Refers to an individual not attending or being unavailable without notice for a booked/scheduled service, or where the individual is not at the agreed location at the agreed time for the service.

 

3.0 POLICY

  • Holistic Home Care is committed to transparent processes by which services can be cancelled.
  • This policy complies with NDIA and NDIS Policy on the management of cancellation of services by a client.

 

  • PROCEDURE
  • The cancellation of a Holistic Home Care service by the client, or failure to attend a scheduled service without notice (No Show), may result in the client being charged the full applicable fee for the booked service and where appropriate, funding may be claimed.
  • Individual NDIS Service Agreements, Home Care Agreements booking request and/or other confirmation documentation provided to clients/parents/guardians will outline requirements for service cancellation notification.
  • Where the client attends for only part of the scheduled service, without notice, payment for the entirety of the booked service may be charged.
  • Where the client fails without notice to attend for the planned service, Holistic Home Care will make every effort to contact the client and/or Carer/guardian to confirm the planned attendance.
  • Where notice is given with less than 24 hours (short notice), Holistic Home Care will try where possible to offer and book the scheduled service to an alternative client.
  • Where the service cannot be offered to an alternative client, the hours of service may be forfeited by the original client and Holistic Home Care will be paid as per the scheduled fee as if the service had occurred.
  • More than 8 instances of cancellations or no shows in a continuous 12 month period will be notified to the funding Agency, to enable consideration of review of the client’s plan.
  • For instances where Holistic Home Care initiates the cancellation of a service due to operational reasons, the service will be rescheduled at no penalty to either party.
  • Should either party wish to end the Service Agreement they must give one month’s notice. If either party seriously breaches this Service Agreement the requirement of notice will be waived.
  • All new Service Agreements between clients and Holistic Home Care will include details of advice periods for cancellations and possible forfeit of the booked service.

 

Notice Period before Scheduled Service Action Fee

  • Where Reasonable Notice is provided, there will be no penalty and Holistic Home Care will reschedule the service with the client.
  • Where the client provides Short Notice the client forfeits the service if it cannot be offered and booked to another client and Holistic Home Care is paid as if the Service occurred. As per scheduled service fee.
  • Where the client provides No Notice (No Show) the client forfeits the service and Holistic Home Care is paid as if the Service occurred. As per scheduled service fee.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Changes reflect transition from Human Services Quality Framework to NDIS practise standards Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

 

MOBILE PHONE USE IN THE WORKPLACE POLICY AND PROCEDURE

 

Policy Code MPW001.01
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 06 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

 

1.0 INTRODUCTION

The increasing number of work and private mobile phones being used at Holistic Home Care has prompted the need for Holistic Home Care to take steps to ensure that mobile phones are used responsibly within the work environment. This policy is designed to ensure that potential issues (such as mobile etiquette) can be clearly identified and addressed.

 

2.0 SCOPE

This Policy applies to all staff of Holistic Home Care and outlines the use of mobile phones at work. Failure to comply with this policy may result disciplinary action.

3.0 PURPOSE

The purpose of this policy is to inform employees of the expectations of mobile phone use during their working hours. It is intended to give staff some broad guidelines regarding the appropriate use of mobile phones, in the workplace or in the course of carrying out your duties.

 

3.1 Mobile Phone use

Whilst at work employees are expected to exercise the same discretion in using personal mobile phones as is expected for the use of company phones. Excessive personal calls during the workday, regardless of the phone used, can interfere with employee productivity and be distracting to others.

Employees should restrict their personal calls during work. Employees are asked to make personal calls during non-work time where possible. Flexibility will be provided in circumstances demanding immediate attention.

4.0 Mobile Phone etiquette within the work environment

  • Speak in a quite tone (knowing that a mobile phone has a sensitive microphone capable of picking up a soft voice) there is no need to speak louder than you would on any other phone
  • Set the ring tone with a tune that is soft and not intrusive or offensive
  • Adjust ring tone or volume to the social environment
  • Keep conversations quiet and brief
  • Let mobile phones divert to the message service if in the company of others
  • Never use a mobile phone whilst driving if the vehicle is not fitted with a compatible hands free kit
  • Find a private place to talk if around a group of people
  • To ensure the effectiveness of meetings, employees are asked to switch their phones to silent or vibrate mode, or turn them off at meetings
  • Show respect for the people around you by using discretion when you make or take calls in public
  • Ask permission of a person before recording his/her image on a mobile phone
  • Follow any rules about mobile phone use – some places such as hospitals, petrol stations or airplanes, restrict or prohibit the use of mobile phones, so adhere to posted signs and instructions
  • Avoid talking where others might know your business – be aware of your surroundings as many business conversations contain information that should remain confidential or private. Before using a mobile phone in a public location, make sure that there will be enough distance to keep the content of the conversation private. Some issues should be saved for times and locations that will allow for confidentiality

4.1 UNACCEPTABLE USES IN THE WORKPLACE

The following uses of mobile phones are considered unacceptable within the workplace:

  • Accessing the internet or any websites
  • Text messaging, where it is considered excessive by the supervisor and is affecting work performance
  • The taking of personal calls, where it is considered excessive by the supervisor and is affecting work performance
  • Text messaging supervisory staff to notify them of non-attendance at work
  • To intimidate, harass or victimise any person or persons.
POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY AND PROCEDURE

Policy Code MPW002.01
Person Responsible Director
Status (Draft/Released) Released
Date Last Updated 10 September 2019
Reviewed by Megan Mostert, Joanie Grieves
Core Module 2

1.0 Policy Statement

Holistic Home Care employees appropriately use Social Media Applications. It has also been developed to ensure that employees adhere to their obligations to protect the Confidential Information and Intellectual property of the Organisation and treat others with respect.

2.0 Procedures:

The Organisation has a legitimate business interest and right to protect its Confidential Information and its reputation. As such, this policy applies to all information and online communications made by employees via Social Media Applications that refer or relate to an employee’s employment, interactions with other employees or any communications that directly or indirectly relate or refer to the Organisation

Social Media Applications

Social Media Applications include, but are not limited to:

  1. Social Networking sites e.g. Facebook,MySpace, Google Plus, LinkedIn;
  2. Video and Photo sharing websites e.g. Flickr, YouTube;
  3. Micro-blogging sites e.g. Twitter;
  4. Weblogs, including corporate blogs, personal blogs or blogs hosted by tradition media publications, web leads such as RSS feeds;
  5. Forums and discussionCommittees such as Whirlpool, Yahoo! Groups or Google Groups;
  6. Instant messaging services such as Communicator+;
  7. Online Encyclopaedias such as Wikipedia;
  8. Any other web sites that allow individual users or companies to use simple publishing tools.

Social Media Applications is not limited to websites and this policy applies to any other electronic application (such as mobile phone based, or hand held/PDA device based applications) which provides for the sharing of information to user groups or the public at large.

Online communications may include posting or publishing information via Social Media Applications, uploading and/or sharing photos or images, direct messaging, status “updates” or any other form of interaction and/or communication facilitated by social media.

Use of Social Media Applications During Work Time

Employees of the Organisation are permitted to use Social Media Applications during work time on a “reasonable use” basis, subject to the provisions of this policy. However, under no circumstance should an employee use the Organisation equipment, including computers, phones or networks, to access Social Media Applications.

Responsibility

The Organisation employees must:

  1. not disclose any Organisation related information on any Social Media Application unless otherwise authorised by Management or the Organisation;
  2. ensure that they do not encourage, aid or abet other persons to use social media inappropriately;
  3. ensure they do not disclose any information about fellow Organisation employees on any Social Media Applications or similar;
  4. under no circumstances take photos of Organisation employees, events or workplaces to be posted on any Social Media Applications unless otherwise authorised by Management or the Organisation;
  5. ensure no material is published or disclosed that is obscene, defamatory, threatening, harassing, discriminatory or hateful to another person or entity including the Organisation, its officers, directors, employees, agents or representatives, its clients, partners, suppliers, competitors or contractors;
  6. ensure they notify their manager, supervisor or the appropriate contact person in the Organisation should they be aware any material which may damage the Organisation or its reputation
  7. ensure that they do not make any online communication that is in any way disparaging or unfavourable about the Organisation and/or is likely to bring the Organisation into disrepute or ridicule;
  8. maintain and protect the Confidential Information of the Organisation in their communications and not use the name the Organisation or any other like title identifying the Organisation in any domain name, or in the title of any blog or any other personal site that may be established;
  9. not use or display any of the Organisation’s Intellectual Property in any online communications without the express written consent of senior management of the Organisation.

Any online communication to or facilitated by Social Media Applications using the Organisation’s information systems may be subject to the Organisation’s Workplace Surveillance policy or equivalent, where applicable.

Employees who do choose to reveal or imply their place of employment on Social Media Applications or a personal site should be aware that they are potentially increasing exposure for both themselves and the Organisation. Employees are responsible and accountable for information that they put forward via social media and should monitor their posts accordingly.

Posting on behalf of the Organisation 

Employees are not to post on behalf of the Organisation without the Organisation’s written consent.

The Organisation reserves the right to request that employees remove any published content where published on a social media site, if not suitable or if inappropriate.

POLICY AMENDMENT RECORD
DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENT AUTHORISED
21 August 2019 Director

End of policy document. Uncontrolled when printed.

[1] Australian National Audit Office, 1999.

[2] AS 8001-2008 Fraud and Corruption Control

[3] AS 8001-2008 Fraud and Corruption Control

[4] National Standards for Disability Services, Department of Social Services

[5] Adapted from the Australian Medical Association definition.

[6] Australian Standard AS/NZS ISO 10002:2014 Guidelines for Complaints Management in Organisations